Paleontology
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Homo erectus Existed 200,000 Years Earlier than Previously Thought  SCI-NEWS.COM · 2 days
An international team of paleoanthropologists has unearthed a 2-million-year-old skull of Homo erectus, the first of our ancestors... more
Lacustrine ecosystems needed 10 million years to recover after end-permian mass extinction  PHYS.ORG · 2 days
The end-Permian mass extinction (EPME), approximately 252 million years ago (Ma), caused a serious marine and terrestrial ecosystem crisis, and about 75% of terrestrial... more
Tooth be told: Earless seals existed in ancient Australia  PHYS.ORG · 2 days
A fossilised seal tooth found on a Victorian beach could hold the key to uncovering the history and geography of earless seals that graced Australia's shores three million years ago. more
When three species of human ancestor walked the Earth  SCIENCE DAILY · 2 days
Scientists share details of the most ancient fossil of Homo erectus known and discuss how these new findings are forcing us to rewrite a part of our species' evolutionary history. more
90-Million-Year-Old Fossilized Rainforest Discovered in Antarctica  SCI-NEWS.COM · 2 days
An international team of paleontologists and geologists has uncovered well-preserved fossilized roots, pollen and spores of 90-million-year-old (mid-Cretaceous period) rainforest trees in West Antarctica.... more
Woman seeks man in ancient Egyptian 'erotic binding spell'  LIVE SCIENCE · 2 days
An Egyptian papyrus dating to 1,800 years describes a spell conjuring a ghost to play matchmaker between a woman and the man of her dreams. more
Contemporaneity of Australopithecus, Paranthropus, and early Homo erectus in South Africa  Science Magazine · 3 days
Understanding the extinction of Australopithecus and origins of Paranthropus and Homo in South Africa has been hampered by the perceived complex geological context of hominin fossils,... more
Six million-year-old bird skeleton points to arid past of Tibetan plateau  PHYS.ORG · 3 days
Researchers from the Institute of Vertebrate Paleontology and Paleoanthropology (IVPP) of the Chinese Academy of Sciences have found a new species of sandgrouse in six to... more
Fossil trove sheds light on ancient antipodean ecology  PHYS.ORG · 3 days
The oldest known animals and plants preserved in amber from Southern Gondwana are reported in Scientific Reports this week. Gondwana, the supercontinent made up of South America, Africa, Madagascar, India, Antarctica and... more
Baby steps: Ancient skull helps trace path to modern childhood  PHYS.ORG · 3 days
Within our extended primate family consisting of lemurs, monkeys, and apes, humans have the largest brains. Our closest living relatives, chimpanzees, weigh about two-thirds as much as us,... more
Fossil skull casts doubt over modern human ancestry  PHYS.ORG · 3 days
Griffith University scientists have led an international team to date the skull of an early human found in Africa, potentially upending human evolution knowledge with their discovery. more
Study offers new insight into the impact of ancient migrations on the European landscape  PHYS.ORG · 3 days
Neolithic populations have long been credited with bringing about a revolution in farming practices across Europe. However, a new study... more
Skull scans reveal evolutionary secrets of fossil brains  PHYS.ORG · 4 days
Scientists have long been able to measure and analyze the fossil skulls of our ancient ancestors to estimate brain volume and growth. The question of how these ancient brains compare to modern... more
Evolutionary adaptation helped cave bears hibernate, but may have caused extinction  PHYS.ORG · 4 days
A study published in Science Advances on April 1 reveals a new hypothesis that may explain why European cave bears went extinct during past climate change... more
Australopithecus afarensis endocasts suggest ape-like brain organization and prolonged brain growth  Science Magazine · 4 days
Human brains are three times larger, are organized differently, and mature for a longer period of time than those of our closest living relatives, the chimpanzees.... more
Oldest ever human genetic evidence clarifies dispute over our ancestors  SCIENCE DAILY · 4 days
Genetic information from an 800,000-year-old human fossil has been retrieved for the first time. The results shed light on one of the branching points in the human family... more
Traces of ancient rainforest in Antarctica point to a warmer prehistoric world  SCIENCE DAILY · 4 days
Researchers have found evidence of rainforests near the South Pole 90 million years ago, suggesting the climate was exceptionally warm at the time. more
Landmark skull fossil provides surprising human evolution clues  REUTERS · 4 days
Scientists have solved a longstanding mystery over the age of a landmark skull found in 1921 in Zambia - the... more
Mysterious human ancestor finds its place in our family tree  Science Magazine · 4 days
Ancient proteins reveal that H. antecessor was likely a close cousin to modern humans and Neanderthals more
Oldest-ever human genetic evidence clarifies dispute over our ancestors  PHYS.ORG · 4 days
Genetic information from an 800,000-year-old human fossil has been retrieved for the first time. The results from the University of Copenhagen shed light on one of the branching points in... more
Traces of ancient rainforest in Antarctica point to a warmer prehistoric world  PHYS.ORG · 4 days
Researchers have found evidence of rainforests near the South Pole 90 million years ago, suggesting the climate was exceptionally warm at the time. more
First proof of donkey polo in ancient China found in noblewoman's tomb  LIVE SCIENCE · 4 days
Archaeologists recently discovered the first evidence that wealthy women in ancient China played polo on donkeys. more
An affordable and fast clinical test that can save human lives and spares at-risk population  PHYS.ORG · 4 days
Horseshoe crabs are remarkable animals, beautiful in their weirdness. These "living fossils" evolved 450 million years ago and... more
In an African forest, a fight to save the endangered pangolin  PHYS.ORG · 5 days
The prehistoric shape is hard to make out as it moves slowly through the gloomy forest, so trackers listen for the rustle of scales against the... more
The unlikely story of the green peafowl  PHYS.ORG · 5 days
We all know that habitat loss is pushing many species to the brink of extinction, with the conversion of forests for agricultural use a particular problem. more
Defaunation in rainforests could have more severe consequences than reported  PHYS.ORG · 5 days
Tropical rainforests are emptying out due to the ongoing extinction of animal species caused by overhunting and forest fragmentation. But not only species as such, also the number... more
New Trump mileage standards to gut Obama climate effort  PHYS.ORG · 5 days
President Donald Trump is poised to roll back ambitious Obama-era vehicle mileage standards and raise the ceiling on damaging fossil fuel emissions for years to come, gutting one of the... more
Water pressure: Ancient aquatic crocs evolved, enlarged to avoid freezing  PHYS.ORG · 5 days
Taking the evolutionary plunge into water and abandoning land for good, as some crocodilian ancestors did nearly 200 million years ago, is often framed as choosing freedom: from... more
Tree rings could pin down Thera volcano eruption date  PHYS.ORG · 6 days
Charlotte Pearson's eyes scanned a palm-sized chunk of ancient tree. They settled on a ring that looked "unusually light," and she made a note without giving it a second thought.... more
Sturgeon genome sequenced  PHYS.ORG · 6 days
Sometimes referred to as the "the Methuselah of freshwater fish," sturgeons and their close relatives are very old from an evolutionary point of view. Fossils indicate that sturgeons date back 250 million years and have changed very little during this... more
Modern science reveals ancient secret in Japanese literature  PHYS.ORG · 6 days
Nearly a millennium and a half ago, red light streaked across the night sky over Japan. Witnesses compared it to the tail of a pheasant—it appeared as a fan of beautiful red... more
A Martian mash up: Meteorites tell story of Mars' water history  PHYS.ORG · 6 days
In Jessica Barnes' palm is an ancient, coin-sized mosaic of glass, minerals and rocks as thick as a strand of wool fiber. It is a slice... more
Scientists propose new strategy for carbon dioxide electrochemical reduction  PHYS.ORG · 6 days
Carbon dioxide (CO2) emission has become a global problem. Efficient conversion of CO2 into value-added liquid fuels is one method to fix CO2, and it can alleviate the growing shortage... more
Ancient cultic area for warrior-god uncovered in Iraq  LIVE SCIENCE · 6 days
A 5,000-year-old cultic area dedicated to a Mesopotamian warrior god has been discovered in an ancient city in Iraq. more
In Earth's largest extinction, land animal die-offs began long before marine extinction  SCIENCE DAILY · 1 week
Because of poor dates for land fossils laid down before and after the mass extinction at the end of the Permian, paleontologists assumed that... more
European Neanderthals mostly used aquatic resources 100,000 years ago  NEWS MEDICAL · 1 week
Ernestina Badal, professor at the Department of Prehistory, Archeology and Ancient History at the University of Valencia, has participated in research published today in the prestigious journal Science that confirms... more
Control of anthropogenic atmospheric emissions can improve water quality in seas  SCIENCE DAILY · 1 week
A new research highlighted the importance of reducing fossil fuel combustion not only to curb the trend of global warming, but also to improve the quality... more
Case studies provide in-depth lessons about sustainability  PHYS.ORG · 1 week
"I can't watch these animals go extinct and sit by," Josh, general manager of Mugie Conservancy said in an interview about the problem of poaching other animals, usually for profit. This after he received... more
Control of anthropogenic emissions can improve water quality in coastal seas  PHYS.ORG · 1 week
A new study highlights the importance of reducing fossil fuel combustion, not only to curb the trend of global warming, but also to improve the quality... more
Longer lives not dependent on increased energy use  SCIENCE DAILY · 1 week
Growing consumption of energy and fossil fuels over four decades did not play a significant role in increasing life expectancy across 70 countries. New research has quantified the importance of different development... more
Researchers create framework for evaluating environmental stopgap measures  PHYS.ORG · 1 week
Ending global environmental crises such as climate change and slowing the growing number of extinctions of plant and animal species will require radical solutions that could take centuries to implement. Meanwhile, the... more
New Feathered Dinosaur Unveiled: Dineobellator notohesperus  SCI-NEWS.COM · 1 week
A new species of dromaeosaurid dinosaur being named Dineobellator notohesperus has been discovered by a team of U.S. paleontologists. Dineobellator notohesperus lived some 67... more
Longer lives not dependent on increased energy use  PHYS.ORG · 1 week
Growing consumption of energy and fossil fuels over four decades did not play a significant role in increasing life expectancy across 70 countries. more
Coral tells own tale about El Niño's past  SCIENCE DAILY · 1 week
Scientists use data from ancient coral to build a record of temperatures in the tropical Pacific Ocean over the last millennium. The data question previous links between volcanic eruptions and El Niño... more
Coral tells own tale about El Nino's past  PHYS.ORG · 1 week
There is no longer a need to guess what ocean temperatures were like in the remote tropical Pacific hundreds of years ago. The ancient coral that lived there know all. more
No consistent ENSO response to volcanic forcing over the last millennium  Science Magazine · 1 week
The El Niño–Southern Oscillation (ENSO) shapes global climate patterns yet its sensitivity to external climate forcing remains uncertain. Modeling studies suggest that ENSO is sensitive to... more
New feathered dinosaur was one of the last surviving raptors  PHYS.ORG · 1 week
A new feathered dinosaur that lived in New Mexico 67 million years ago is one of the last known surviving raptor species, according to a new publication in... more
Discovering the diet of the fossil Theropithecus oswaldi found in Cueva Victoria in Spain  PHYS.ORG · 1 week
A study published in Journal of Human Evolution reveals for the first time the diet of the fossil baboon Theropithecus... more
Simulation: Dust could have spread evenly over Earth after Chicxulub asteroid strike  PHYS.ORG · 1 week
Two researchers, one with the Planetary Science Institute, the other Imperial College, have created a simulation that they believe shows how dust could have... more
Mathematical epidemiology: How to model a pandemic  PHYS.ORG · 1 week
Disease has afflicted humans ever since there have been human. Malaria and tuberculosis are thought to have ravaged Ancient Egypt more than 5,000 years ago. From AD 541 to 542 the global pandemic known... more
New Pterosaur Fossils Unearthed in Morocco  SCI-NEWS.COM · 1 week
Paleontologists have uncovered the remains of three species of fish-eating toothed pterosaurs in the Cretaceous-period Kem Kem beds of Morocco. Pterosaurs were Earth’s first... more
In Earth's largest extinction, land die-offs began long before ocean turnover  PHYS.ORG · 1 week
The mass extinction at the end of the Permian Period 252 million years ago—one of the great turnovers of life on Earth—appears to have played out... more
Fossil finds give clues about flying reptiles in the Sahara 100 million years ago  SCIENCE DAILY · 2 weeks
Three new species of toothed pterosaurs -- flying reptiles of the Cretaceous period, some 100 million years ago -- have... more
Innovative thinner electrolyte can improve functioning of solid oxide fuel cells  PHYS.ORG · 2 weeks
In this post-industrialization age, electricity has become the backbone of our society. However, using fossil fuels to generate it is not the best option because of... more
Fossil finds give clues about flying reptiles in the Sahara 100 million years ago  PHYS.ORG · 2 weeks
Three new species of toothed pterosaurs—flying reptiles of the Cretaceous period, some 100 million years ago—have been identified in Africa... more
Small horses got smaller, big tapirs got bigger 47 million years ago  SCIENCE DAILY · 2 weeks
The former coalfield of Geiseltal in Saxony-Anhalt has yielded large numbers of exceptionally preserved fossil animals, giving palaeontologists a unique window into the evolution... more
Croatia's Dubrovnik, home to ancient quarantine facilities  ABC NEWS · 2 weeks
Just outside the majestic walls of Croatia’s medieval citadel city of Dubrovnik lies a cluster of small stone houses known as the Lazarettos of Dubrovnik, today an art and clubbing hub and a tourist... more
Oldest Bilaterian Fossil Found in Australia  SCI-NEWS.COM · 2 weeks
Ikaria wariootia, a wormlike creature that lived more than 555 million years ago (Ediacaran period) in what is now Australia, is the earliest bilaterian,... more
Small horses got smaller, big tapirs got bigger 47 million years ago  PHYS.ORG · 2 weeks
The former coalfield of Geiseltal in eastern Germany has yielded large numbers of exceptionally preserved fossil animals, giving palaeontologists a unique window into the... more
Ancestor of all animals identified in Australian fossils  SCIENCE DAILY · 2 weeks
Geologists have discovered the first ancestor on the family tree that contains most animals today, including humans. The wormlike creature, Ikaria wariootia, is the earliest bilaterian, or organism with a front and... more
Pablo Escobar's hippos may help counteract a legacy of extinctions  PHYS.ORG · 2 weeks
When cocaine kingpin Pablo Escobar was shot dead in 1993, the four hippos he brought to his private zoo in Colombia were left behind in a pond on... more
Ancestor of all animals identified in Australian fossils  PHYS.ORG · 2 weeks
A team led by UC Riverside geologists has discovered the first ancestor on the family tree that contains most familiar animals today, including humans. more
New 3-D view of methane tracks sources  PHYS.ORG · 2 weeks
NASA's new 3-dimensional portrait of methane concentrations shows the world's second largest contributor to greenhouse warming, the diversity of sources on the ground, and the behavior of the gas as it moves through the... more
Meet Wonderchicken, Bird from Final Part of Dinosaur Era  SCI-NEWS.COM · 2 weeks
A new species of ancient bird has been identified from a nearly complete, three-dimensionally preserved skull and associated... more
New catalyst material could fuel clean energy revolution  PHYS.ORG · 2 weeks
Fuel cells and water electrolyzers that are cheap and efficient will form the cornerstone of a hydrogen fuel based economy, which is one of the most promising clean and sustainable alternatives to... more
A pigment from ancient Egypt to modern microscopy  SCIENCE DAILY · 2 weeks
Egyptian blue is one of the oldest humanmade colour pigments. It adorns the crown of the world famous bust of Nefertiti: but the pigment can do even more. An international research team... more
What Jenga can teach us about wildlife conservation before it's too late  PHYS.ORG · 2 weeks
Despite considerable effort, and some wonderful success stories, it is widely acknowledged that global conservation targets to reverse declines in biodiversity and halt species... more
Scientists assess the accelerated changes of glaciers in the Yulong Snow Mountain  PHYS.ORG · 2 weeks
The Yulong Snow Mountain (YSM) is a region of temperate glaciers in the southeast Qinghai-Tibetan Plateau. As one of the most famous tourist attractions... more
Eastern monarch butterfly population plunges below extinction threshold  PHYS.ORG · 2 weeks
The yearly count of monarch butterflies overwintering in Mexico, released today, shows a decrease of 53% from last year's count and is well below the threshold at which government scientists predict the... more
Unprecedented preservation of fossil feces from the La Brea Tar Pits  PHYS.ORG · 2 weeks
While Rancho La Brea, commonly known as the La Brea Tar Pits, is famous for its thousands of bones of large extinct mammals, big insights are... more
Darkness, not cold, likely responsible for dinosaur-killing extinction  PHYS.ORG · 2 weeks
New research finds soot from global fires ignited by an asteroid impact could have blocked sunlight long enough to drive the mass extinction that killed most life on Earth, including the dinosaurs,... more
Geologists find lost fragment of ancient continent in Canada's North  PHYS.ORG · 2 weeks
Sifting through diamond exploration samples from Baffin Island, Canadian scientists have identified a new remnant of the North Atlantic craton—an ancient part of Earth's continental crust. more
Fine-tuning radiocarbon dating could 'rewrite' ancient events  SCIENCE DAILY · 2 weeks
A new paper points out the need for an important new refinement to radiocarbon dating. The research has relevance for understanding key dates in Mediterranean history and prehistory, including the tomb of Tutankhamen and... more
Fins of prehistoric fish reveal origins of the human hand  REUTERS · 2 weeks
Inside the stout fins of a fish that prowled the shallow waters of an estuary in... more
Ancient artifacts on the beaches of Northern Europe, and how we remember music  Science Magazine · 2 weeks
On this week’s show, host Joel Goldberg talks with science journalist Andrew Curry about archaeological finds from thousands of years ago along... more
History, mass loss, structure, and dynamic behavior of the Antarctic Ice Sheet  Science Magazine · 2 weeks
Antarctica contains most of Earth’s fresh water stored in two large ice sheets. The more stable East Antarctic Ice Sheet is larger and older,... more
Ancient teeth reveal Bronze Age gender inequality  PHYS.ORG · 2 weeks
Analysing 2500-year-old teeth has thrown open a window onto life and gender inequality during Bronze Age China. more
Fossil snake with infrared vision: Early evolution of snakes in the Messel Pit examined  PHYS.ORG · 2 weeks
Together with his Argentinian colleague Agustín Scanferla, Senckenberg scientist Krister Smith studied the early evolution of snakes in the Messel... more
Fine-tuning radiocarbon dating could 'rewrite' ancient events  PHYS.ORG · 2 weeks
Radiocarbon dating, invented in the late 1940s and improved ever since to provide more precise measurements, is the standard method for determining the dates of artifacts in archaeology and other disciplines. more
'Wonderchicken' fossil from the age of dinosaurs reveals origin of modern birds  SCIENCE DAILY · 2 weeks
The oldest fossil of a modern bird yet found, dating from the age of dinosaurs, has been identified by an international team of palaeontologists. more
Late cretaceous dinosaur-dominated ecosystem  SCIENCE DAILY · 2 weeks
A topic of considerable interest to paleontologists is how dinosaur-dominated ecosystems were structured, how dinosaurs and co-occurring animals were distributed across the landscape, how they interacted with one another, and how these systems compared to ecosystems today. more
Beetles changed their diet during the Cretaceous period  SCIENCE DAILY · 3 weeks
Like a snapshot, amber preserves bygone worlds. Paleontologists have now described four new beetle species in fossilized tree resin from Myanmar, which belong to the Kateretidae family. As well as the about... more
Late cretaceous dinosaur-dominated ecosystem  PHYS.ORG · 3 weeks
A topic of considerable interest to paleontologists is how dinosaur-dominated ecosystems were structured, how dinosaurs and co-occurring animals were distributed across the landscape, how they interacted with one another, and how these systems compared to ecosystems today. In the Late... more
National monuments and economic growth in the American West  Science Magazine · 3 weeks
National monuments in the United States are protected lands that contain historic landmarks, historic and prehistoric structures, or other objects of historic or scientific interest. Their designations are often contentious.... more
'Wonderchicken' fossil from Belgium reveals dawn of modern birds  REUTERS · 3 weeks
A fossil unearthed in Belgium dubbed the "Wonderchicken" is providing a rare glimpse into the early evolution of... more
Fish sprouted fingers before they ventured onto land, fossil shows  LIVE SCIENCE · 3 weeks
This 380-million-year-old fish had five "fingers" in its pectoral fins, showing that fish developed fingers before making the move to land. more
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