Paleontology
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Defaunation precipitates the extinction of evolutionarily distinct interactions in the Anthropocene  Science Magazine · 9 hours
Species on Earth are interconnected with each other through ecological interactions. Defaunation can erode those connections, yet we lack evolutionary predictions about the consequences of losing... more
Gregarious suspension feeding in a modular Ediacaran organism  Science Magazine · 9 hours
Reconstructing Precambrian eukaryotic paleoecology is pivotal to understanding the origins of the modern, animal-dominated biosphere. Here, we combine new fossil data from southern Namibia with computational fluid dynamics (CFD) to test between... more
Human migration in Oceania recreated through paper mulberry genetics  PHYS.ORG · 10 hours
The migration and interaction routes of prehistoric humans throughout the islands of Oceania can be retraced using genetic differences between paper mulberry plants, a tree native to Asia cultivated for... more
Antarctic marine life recovery following the dinosaurs' extinction  SCIENCE DAILY · 12 hours
A new study shows how marine life around Antarctica returned after the extinction event that wiped out the dinosaurs. A team studied just under 3000 marine fossils collected from Antarctica to understand... more
Hyenas Once Lived above Arctic Circle  SCI-NEWS.COM · 14 hours
Paleontologists have found two fossilized teeth of extinct cursorial hyenas (genus Chasmaporthetes) in the remote Old Crow River region in northern Yukon Territory, Canada.... more
Troublesome trees: spread of forests contributed to ancient extinction  PHYS.ORG · 14 hours
Evidence from ancient rocks in north Alabama show the Earth's first forest spread rapidly, likely contributing to a mass extinction of shallow marine life some 370 million years ago. more
Crocs' climate clock: Ancient distribution of Crocs could reveal more about past climates  SCIENCE DAILY · 15 hours
Underneath their tough exteriors, some crocodilians have a sensitive side that scientists could use to shine light on our ancient climate. more
Marine life recovery following the dinosaurs' extinction  PHYS.ORG · 15 hours
A new study shows how marine life around Antarctica returned after the extinction event that wiped out the dinosaurs. more
Crocs' climate clock: Ancient distribution of Crocs could reveal more about past climates  PHYS.ORG · 20 hours
Underneath their tough exteriors, some crocodilians have a sensitive side that scientists could use to shine light on our ancient climate, according... more
Sea otters have low genetic diversity like other threatened species, biologists report  SCIENCE DAILY · 1 day
Sea otters have very low genetic diversity, scientists report. Their findings have implications for the conservation of rare and endangered species, in which a... more
New study shows how environmental disruptions affected ancient societies  SCIENCE DAILY · 1 day
A new study shows that over the past 10,000 years, humanity has experienced a number of foundational transitions, or 'bottlenecks.' During these periods of transition, the advance or decline of... more
New insight from Great Barrier Reef coral provides correction factor to climate records  SCIENCE DAILY · 1 day
Newly developed geological techniques help uncover the most accurate and high-resolution climate records to date, according to a new study. The research... more
Sea otters have low genetic diversity like other threatened species, biologists report  PHYS.ORG · 1 day
Sea otters have low genetic diversity, which could endanger their health as a species, a UCLA-led team of life scientists has discovered. The findings... more
Fossil teeth reveal ancient hyenas in the Arctic  SCIENCE DAILY · 1 day
Modern hyenas are known as hunters and scavengers in Asian and African ecosystems such as the savanna. But in ancient times, these powerful carnivores also roamed a very different landscape, inhabiting the... more
Dinosaur bones are home to microscopic life  SCIENCE DAILY · 1 day
Scientists went looking for preserved collagen, the protein in bone and skin, in dinosaur fossils. They didn't find the protein, but they did find huge colonies of modern bacteria living inside the dinosaur bones. more
Scientists studying how large-scale environmental disruptions affected ancient societies  PHYS.ORG · 1 day
John Day, Distinguished Professor Emeritus in LSU's College of the Coast & Environment, has collaborated on a new analysis of societal development with Joel Gunn of the University of North... more
New insight from Great Barrier Reef coral provides correction factor to climate records  PHYS.ORG · 1 day
Newly developed geological techniques help uncover the most accurate and high-resolution climate records to date, according to a new study. The research... more
Dark centers of chromosomes reveal ancient DNA  PHYS.ORG · 1 day
Geneticists exploring the dark heart of the human genome have discovered big chunks of Neanderthal and other ancient DNA. The results open new ways to study both how chromosomes behave during cell division and... more
Dinosaur bones are home to microscopic life  PHYS.ORG · 2 days
Bad news, Jurassic Park fans—the odds of scientists cloning a dinosaur from ancient DNA are pretty much zero. That's because DNA breaks down over time and isn't stable enough to stay intact for millions... more
3-D cranial reconstruction elucidates the evolution of new world monkeys  PHYS.ORG · 2 days
Researchers have used computed tomography (CT) scanning to examine and reconstruct cranial fossils belonging to two extinct species of monkey, Caipora bambuiorum and Cartelles coimbrafilhoi. The fossils were... more
The increase in wildfires is linked via climate change to social inequity  PHYS.ORG · 2 days
When the crown jewel of industrial civilization—the automobile—was introduced in London, it was met with resistance. Wouldn't burning fossil fuels pollute the air? "Yes,... more
Fossil teeth reveal ancient hyenas in the Arctic  PHYS.ORG · 2 days
Modern hyenas are known as hunters and scavengers in Asian and African ecosystems such as the savanna. more
Indian family branches out with novel tree house  PHYS.ORG · 2 days
When the Kesharwanis decided to branch out and expand their family home, they came up with a novel way of dealing with an ancient giant fig tree in their garden—they built the... more
9,000 years ago, a community with modern urban problems  SCIENCE DAILY · 2 days
Bioarchaeologists report new findings from the ancient ruins of Çatalhöyük, in modern Turkey. The results paint a picture of what it was like for humans to move from a nomadic... more
Prehistoric settlement in Turkey bears telltale signs of modern woes  REUTERS · 2 days
Overcrowding. Violence. Infectious diseases. Environmental degradation. It may sound like the worst of modern mega-cities. more
Past climate change: A warning for the future?  SCIENCE DAILY · 2 days
A new study of climate changes and their effects on past societies offers a sobering glimpse of social upheavals that might happen in the future. The prehistoric groups studied lived in the... more
Global commodities trade and consumption place the world's primates at risk of extinction  SCIENCE DAILY · 2 days
A recent study highlights the fact that the economic benefits of commodity export for primate habitat countries has been limited relative to... more
Renewable transportation fuels from water and carbon dioxide  PHYS.ORG · 3 days
The transition from fossil to renewable fuels is one of the most important challenges of the future. The SUN-to-LIQUID project takes on this challenge by producing renewable transportation fuels from water and... more
Global commodities trade and consumption place the world's primates at risk of extinction  PHYS.ORG · 3 days
A recent study published in the peer-reviewed journal PeerJ—the Journal of Life and Environmental Sciences highlights the fact that the economic benefits... more
Pass The Brazier: Early Evidence Of Cannabis Smoking Found On Chinese Artifacts  NPR · 5 days
Humans have been smoking pot to get high since the first millennium B.C. Archaeologists have found early evidence of cannabis use from wooden bowls... more
A shady spot may protect species against rapid climate warming  SCIENCE DAILY · 5 days
A shady refuge on a hot day could be more than a simple comfort in a warming world. Finding a cooler spot might save several species that would... more
A shady spot may protect species against rapid climate warming  PHYS.ORG · 5 days
Finding a shady refuge to cool off on a hot day could be more than a lifesaver in a warming world. It might save several species that would... more
Flickering sky islands generate andean biodiversity  PHYS.ORG · 5 days
A new video shows how climate change connected and disconnected Andean "sky islands" during the past million years. The innovative mathematical model used to make the video was based on fossil pollen records and shows how... more
Giant Cambrian Trilobite Species Unearthed in Australia  SCI-NEWS.COM · 6 days
Paleontologists have unearthed fossils of a giant trilobite species that inhabited Australian waters approximately 500 million years ago (Cambrian period). Trilobites are... more
Oldest axial fossils discovered for the genus Australopithecus  PHYS.ORG · 6 days
Scientists have published an article describing the oldest axial fossils yet discovered for the genus Australopithecus. Dated 4.2 million years ago, these and other fossils recovered from the Assa Issie site in... more
Proposal to mine fossil-rich site in New Zealand sparks campaign to protect it  PHYS.ORG · 6 days
An Australian company's application to mine a fossil-rich site in the south of New Zealand has been met with fierce criticism and... more
Ancient 'Loch Ness Monster' from Antarctica Breaks a Record for Body Size  LIVE SCIENCE · 6 days
Paleontologists have discovered the remains of an ancient Loch Ness Monster look-alike in freezing Antarctica. And just like the legendary Nessie, it wasn't the... more
New 'king' of fossils discovered in Australia  SCIENCE DAILY · 7 days
Fossils of a giant new species from the long-extinct group of sea creatures called trilobites have been found on Kangaroo Island, South Australia. more
Undocumented plant extinctions are a big problem in Australia  PHYS.ORG · 7 days
A recent survey on the world's plants found a shocking number have gone extinct—571 since 1750. And this is likely to be a stark underestimate. Not all plants have been... more
New statistical formulas for assigning sex to fossils  PHYS.ORG · 7 days
The CENIEH researcher Adrián Pablos is co-author of a paper which offers a methodology for assigning the sex to fossils of Homo sapiens and opens up the possibility of applying it to... more
New 'king' of fossils discovered on Kangaroo Island  PHYS.ORG · 7 days
Fossils of a giant new species from the long-extinct group of sea creatures called trilobites have been found on Kangaroo Island, South Australia. more
Parrot world's endangered heavyweight faces new threat  PHYS.ORG · 7 days
An unprecedented disease outbreak has pushed the critically endangered kakapo, the world's fattest parrot, closer to extinction, New Zealand scientists said Thursday. more
Diet at the docks: Living and dying at the port of ancient Rome  SCIENCE DAILY · 1 week
Researchers present the results of an analysis of plant, animal and human remains, reconstructing both the diets and geographic origins of the... more
Origins of cannabis smoking  SCIENCE DAILY · 1 week
A chemical residue study of incense burners from ancient burials at high elevations in western China has revealed psychoactive cannabinoids. The finding provides some of the earliest evidence for the use of cannabis for its psychoactive compounds. more
Baby pterodactyls could fly from birth  SCIENCE DAILY · 1 week
Researchers have found that pterodactyls, extinct flying reptiles also known as pterosaurs, had a remarkable ability -- they could fly from birth. more
Rising sea levels destroyed evidence of shell middens at many prehistoric coastal sites  SCIENCE DAILY · 1 week
In a new study, researchers confirm a theory from the 1970s that coastal hunter-gatherers processed much of their shellfish at the beach... more
Monkeys face climate change extinction threat  SCIENCE DAILY · 1 week
Monkeys living in South America are highly vulnerable to climate change and face an 'elevated risk of extinction', according to a new study. more
Rising sea levels destroyed evidence of shell middens at many prehistoric coastal sites  PHYS.ORG · 1 week
Archaeological remains of coastal occupation in the form of shell middens are commonly found on today's shorelines, and evidence for shellfish as... more
The origins of cannabis smoking: Marijuana use in the first millennium BC  PHYS.ORG · 1 week
Cannabis has been cultivated for millennia in East Asia as an oil-seed and fibre crop. Little is known, however, about the early use and... more
New to science New Zealand moths link mythological deities to James Cameron's films  SCIENCE DAILY · 1 week
In an unexpected discovery, two species of macro-moths were described as new species endemic to the South Island, New Zealand. Each is... more
Study: Pterosaurs Had Remarkable Ability to Fly from Birth  SCI-NEWS.COM · 1 week
Pterosaurs were winged flying reptiles that lived at the same time as dinosaurs, between 210 million and 65... more
Monkeys face climate change extinction threat  PHYS.ORG · 1 week
Monkeys living in South America are highly vulnerable to climate change and face an "elevated risk of extinction," according to a new University of Stirling-led study. more
Injection-molding wood powder for sustainable fabrication  PHYS.ORG · 1 week
Biomass materials such as wood are environmentally-friendly alternatives to fossil resources. As an example, wood is typically non-toxic and carbon neutral. Furthermore, wood can be produced in a sustainable manner by appropriate planting and trimming of... more
Baby pterodactyls could fly from birth  PHYS.ORG · 1 week
A breakthrough discovery reveals that pterodactyls, extinct flying reptiles, had a remarkable ability—they could fly from birth. The importance of this discovery is highlighted by the fact that no other living vertebrates today, or those in... more
Diet at the docks: Living and dying at the port of ancient Rome  PHYS.ORG · 1 week
Portus Romae was established in the middle of the first century AD and for well over 400 years was Rome's gateway to... more
New photography technique brings hidden history of fossils to light  PHYS.ORG · 1 week
We've all seen and marveled at them: perfect fossils of gargantuan dinosaurs or other exotic creatures from the ancient world. But the truth is, sometimes there's more than... more
Leatherback sea turtles likely to go extinct under Trump administration policy, lawsuit argues  PHYS.ORG · 1 week
Leatherback sea turtles are likely to be "effectively extinct within 20 years" if two new federal permits for fishing off the coast... more
New microorganism for algae biomass to produce alternative fuels  PHYS.ORG · 1 week
Biorefinery technology uses biomass as a feedstock and converts it to energy and other beneficial byproducts. It is drawing attention as an eco-friendly and sustainable technology to prepare for depletion... more
Breakthrough in the discovery of DNA in ancient bones buried in water  PHYS.ORG · 1 week
Fresh evidence rewrites the understanding of the most intriguing archaeological burial site in western Finland. New DNA technology gives significant information on the bones... more
Breakthrough in the discovery of DNA in ancient bones buried in water  SCIENCE DAILY · 1 week
Fresh evidence rewrites the understanding of the most intriguing archaeological burial site in western Finland. New DNA technology gives significant information on the bones... more
Team puts an ancient spin on a new digital currency  PHYS.ORG · 1 week
Cryptocurrency might seem like a next-generation idea, but two University of Oregon researchers say it has roots in the past. more
Study shows recent plant extinctions much more extensive than thought  PHYS.ORG · 1 week
A team of researchers with the Royal Botanic Gardens in the U.K. and Stockholm University has found that plant extinctions over the past two and a half centuries... more
Indian temple helps nurture 'extinct' turtle back to life  PHYS.ORG · 1 week
The black softshell turtle is officially extinct in the wild, but a centuries-old Indian temple and its nature-loving caretaker are helping the creature make a tentative comeback. more
Dramatic change in ancient nomad diets coincides with expansion of networks across Eurasia  PHYS.ORG · 1 week
A meta-analysis of dietary information recorded in the bones of ancient animals and humans recovered from sites scattered across the Eurasian steppe,... more
Dramatic change in ancient nomad diets coincides with expansion of networks across Eurasia  SCIENCE DAILY · 1 week
Strengthening of political networks coincided with the intensification of agricultural production, resulting in the widespread adoption of millet by populations across Eurasia. more
Last-ditch attempt to warn of coalmine harm  PHYS.ORG · 1 week
Groundwater experts from around Australia have repeated calls for further investigations into the potential effects on heritage groundwater reserves in central Queensland if the giant Adani Carmichael coalmine gets the final regulatory go-ahead.Concerns the... more
The Neolithic precedents of gender inequality  PHYS.ORG · 1 week
Researchers from the Department of Prehistory and Archaeology at the University of Seville have studied the archaeological evidence of prehistoric societies in the Neolithic Period in the Iberian Peninsula from the perspective of gender. According to... more
Ancient DNA from Roman and medieval grape seeds reveal ancestry of wine making  PHYS.ORG · 1 week
A grape variety still used in wine production in France today can be traced back 900 years to just one ancestral plant,... more
Carbon plays a starring role in the new book ‘Symphony in C’  SCIENCE-NEWS · 1 week
In Symphony in C, geophysicist Robert Hazen explores carbon’s ancient origins, its role in life and its importance in the modern world. more
Site of biggest ever meteorite collision in the UK discovered  PHYS.ORG · 1 week
Evidence for the ancient, 1.2 billion years old, meteorite strike, was first discovered in 2008 near Ullapool, NW Scotland by scientists from Oxford and Aberdeen Universities. The thickness... more
Planck Finds No New Evidence for Cosmic Anomalies  ASTRO WATCH · 2 weeks
ESA’s Planck satellite has found no new evidence for the puzzling cosmic anomalies that appeared in its temperature map of... more
Genetic Analysis Reveals Previously Unknown Group of Ancient Siberians  SCI-NEWS.COM · 2 weeks
Northeastern Siberia has been inhabited by humans for more than 40,000 years but its deep population history remains... more
New Herbivorous Dinosaur Species Identified in Australia: Fostoria dhimbangunmal  SCI-NEWS.COM · 2 weeks
A new species of two-legged iguanodontian dinosaur has been identified from fossils discovered three decades ago in an... more
Canada Makes a Claim to the North Pole  LIVE SCIENCE · 2 weeks
Now, three northern nations are vying to stake their claim to part of the Arctic seafloor, a region chock-full of fossil fuels that lies under thousands of miles of water and ice. more
Argentine fossils take oak and beech family history far into Southern Hemisphere  SCIENCE DAILY · 2 weeks
One of the world's most important plant families has a history extending much farther south than any live or fossil specimen previously recorded, as... more
Argentine fossils take oak and beech family history far into Southern Hemisphere  PHYS.ORG · 2 weeks
One of the world's most important plant families has a history extending much farther south than any live or fossil specimen previously recorded, as... more
Eocene Fagaceae from Patagonia and Gondwanan legacy in Asian rainforests  Science Magazine · 2 weeks
The beech-oak family Fagaceae dominates forests from the northern temperate zone to tropical Asia and Malesia, where it reaches its southern limit. We report early Eocene infructescences of... more
These First Americans Vanished Without a Trace — But Hints of Them Linger  LIVE SCIENCE · 2 weeks
There are no surviving members of an ancient and mysterious group of people who lived in North America for millennia. Until now,... more
New research shakes up the sloth family tree  PHYS.ORG · 2 weeks
New studies by two research teams published today in the journals Nature Ecology and Evolution and Current Biology challenge decades of accepted scientific opinion concerning the evolutionary relationships of tree sloths and... more
Why humans (or something very similar) may have been destined to walk the Earth  PHYS.ORG · 2 weeks
What would happen if the hands of time were turned back to an arbitrary point in our evolutionary history and... more
'Herd' of dinosaurs found underground at Lightning Ridge  PHYS.ORG · 2 weeks
Scientists have revealed that fossils from an underground opal mine near Lightning Ridge, outback NSW, include remains from a herd of dinosaurs, among them a new dinosaur species and the world's most... more
Renewable transportation fuels from water and carbon dioxide
PHYS.ORG
New photography technique brings hidden history of fossils to light
PHYS.ORG
Oldest evidence of marijuana use discovered in 2500-year-old cemetery in peaks of western China
Science Magazine
Breakthrough in the discovery of DNA in ancient bones buried in water
SCIENCE DAILY
What Is Cryptography?
LIVE SCIENCE
High-tech fishing gear could help save critically endangered right whales
PHYS.ORG
Fossils in Burmese amber offer an exquisite view of dinosaur times—and an ethical minefield
Science Magazine
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