Oceans
Doubt over future of Antarctic ocean sanctuary plans  PHYS.ORG · 4 hours
A push by Australia and France to create a massive ocean sanctuary in east Antarctica is in doubt as nations meet in Hobart to discuss the plans, with China and Russia opposing. more
NASA finds heavy rain potential in typhoon Bualoi over Marianas  PHYS.ORG · 18 hours
Typhoon Bualoi was lashing the Marianas Islands in the Northwestern Pacific Ocean when NASA's Aqua satellite passed overhead and analyzed the cloud top temperatures to give forecasters insight... more
Fish more tolerant than expected to low oxygen events  SCIENCE DAILY · 24 hours
Fish may be more tolerant than previously thought to periods of low oxygen in the oceans, new research shows. more
Fish more tolerant than expected to low oxygen events  PHYS.ORG · 23 hours
Fish may be more tolerant than previously thought to periods of low oxygen in the oceans, new research shows. more
New Geophysical Phenomenon Discovered: Stormquakes  SCI-NEWS.COM · 22 hours
Energetic storms generate strong ocean waves, which can interact with shallow seafloor features located near the edge of continental shelves known as ocean banks; such interactions... more
New deep-water coral discovered  PHYS.ORG · 1 day
Pax, Latin for 'peace' made its way into the scientific name of a new coral discovered off Pacific Panama and described in the journal Bulletin of Marine Science. According to researchers at the Smithsonian Tropical Research Institute (STRI), the Centro... more
Catastrophic events carry forests of trees thousands of miles to a burial at sea  SCIENCE DAILY · 2 days
While studying sediments in the Bay of Bengal, an international team finds evidence dating back millions of years that catastrophic... more
Catastrophic events carry forests of trees thousands of miles to a burial at sea  PHYS.ORG · 2 days
Flooding from torrential rains caused by cyclones and monsoonal storms, as well as other catastrophic events, are responsible for moving... more
Discovery about DNA-reeling bacteria can help inform strategies to stop bacterial infection  NEWS MEDICAL · 2 days
A new study from Indiana University has revealed a previously unknown role a protein plays in helping bacteria reel in DNA in their environment... more
NASA finds a transitioning Tropical Storm Neoguri  PHYS.ORG · 2 days
NASA's Terra satellite passed over the Northwestern Pacific Ocean on Oct. 21 and captured a visible image of Tropical Storm Neoguri. Satellite imagery revealed that the storm is becoming extra-tropical. more
Mystery solved: Ocean acidity in the last mass extinction  PHYS.ORG · 2 days
A new study led by Yale University confirms a long-held theory about the last great mass extinction event in history and how it affected Earth's oceans. The findings may also... more
NASA finds Typhoon Bualoi rapidly intensified  PHYS.ORG · 2 days
Typhoon Bualoi rapidly intensified over 24 hours and quickly developed an eye and powerful thunderstorms.On Oct. 21, the eye of Typhoon Bualoi was just over 50 miles from the island of Saipan when NASA-NOAA's Suomi NPP... more
DNA-reeling bacteria yield new insight on how superbugs acquire drug-resistance  PHYS.ORG · 2 days
A new study from Indiana University has revealed a previously unknown role a protein plays in helping bacteria reel in DNA in their environment—like a fisherman pulling up... more
The size of a bus, rare and endangered whale shark spotted off Florida coast  PHYS.ORG · 2 days
Bigger than Jaws, but not nearly as dangerous, the largest fish in the sea, a whale shark, was spotted off... more
Shipping firms look to sail into the future  PHYS.ORG · 2 days
Global shipping firms under pressure to cut carbon emissions are experimenting with an age-old technology: sails to harness ocean winds and reduce reliance on costly fuels. more
Antarctic ice cliffs may not contribute to sea-level rise as much as predicted  SCIENCE DAILY · 2 days
Researchers report that in order for a 90-meter ice cliff to collapse entirely, the ice shelves supporting the cliff would have to... more
How Antarctic krill fertilize the oceans and even store carbon  PHYS.ORG · 2 days
Krill are best known as whale food. But few people realize that these small, shrimp-like creatures are also important to the health of the ocean and the atmosphere.... more
What was the first color in the universe?  PHYS.ORG · 2 days
The universe bathes in a sea of light, from the blue-white flickering of young stars to the deep red glow of hydrogen clouds. Beyond the colors seen by human eyes, there are... more
Clay minerals call the shots with carbon  SCIENCE DAILY · 2 days
Clay minerals suspended in seawater binds sedimentary organic carbon to their mineral surfaces. But the quantity of carbon that is bound and the source of that carbon very much depends on the clay mineral... more
California's crashing kelp forest  SCIENCE DAILY · 2 days
First the sea stars wasted to nothing. Then purple urchins took over, eating and eating until the bull kelp forests were gone. The red abalone starved. Their fishery closed. Red sea urchins starved. Their fishery collapsed. And the ocean kept... more
Antarctic ice cliffs may not contribute to sea-level rise as much as predicted  PHYS.ORG · 2 days
Antarctica's ice sheet spans close to twice the area of the contiguous United States, and its land boundary is buttressed by massive,... more
California's crashing kelp forest  PHYS.ORG · 2 days
First the sea stars wasted to nothing. Then the purple urchins took over, eating and eating until the bull kelp forests were gone. The red abalone starved. Their fishery closed. Red sea urchins starved. Their fishery collapsed. And the ocean... more
Antarctic ice cliffs may not contribute to sea-level rise as much as predicted  MIT · 2 days
Study finds even the tallest ice cliffs should support their own weight rather than collapsing catastrophically. more
Researchers find second warship from WWII Battle of Midway  PHYS.ORG · 3 days
A crew of deep-sea explorers and historians looking for lost World War II warships have found a second Japanese aircraft carrier that went down in the historic Battle of Midway. more
Deep-sea explorers find sunken warship from key WWII battle  PHYS.ORG · 5 days
Deep-sea explorers scouring the world's oceans for sunken World War II ships are focusing in on debris fields deep in the Pacific, in an area where one of the most... more
Long-Lost WWII Ship Found at the Bottom of the Pacific Ocean  LIVE SCIENCE · 5 days
The Kaga sank during the historic Battle of Midway, along with six other vessels. more
The World's Largest Geode Formed When the Mediterranean Sea Disappeared, New Study Reveals  LIVE SCIENCE · 5 days
The Pulpí Geode, in southern Spain, is the largest geode in the world. For the first time, scientists think they know how... more
NASA-NOAA satellite observes development of Tropical Storm Octave  PHYS.ORG · 5 days
NASA-NOAA's Suomi NPP satellite provided infrared data that showed the development of Tropical Storm Octave in the Eastern Pacific Ocean. more
More than just whale food: Krill's influence on carbon dioxide and global climate  PHYS.ORG · 5 days
Antarctic krill are well-known for their role at the base of the Southern Ocean food web, where they're food for marine predators... more
Glowing to the bottom  PHYS.ORG · 5 days
In the dark depths of the ocean, pretty much the only sources of light are the animals that live there. Whether flashing, glimmering, or emitting glowing liquids, many deep-sea animals are able to produce light (bioluminesce). MBARI researchers recently found... more
Deep-sea explorers seek out sunken World War II ships  PHYS.ORG · 5 days
MIDWAY ATOLL, Northwestern Hawaiian Islands (AP)—Deep-sea explorers scouring the world's oceans for sunken World War II ships are honing in on debris fields deep in the Pacific, in an area... more
How aerosols affect our climate  PHYS.ORG · 6 days
For many, the word "aerosol" might conjure thoughts of hairspray or spray paint. More accurately, though, aerosols are simply particles found in the atmosphere. They can be human-made, like from car exhaust or biomass burning, or naturally occurring,... more
Tailings dumped into Portman Bay continue to release metals into the sea 25 years later  PHYS.ORG · 6 days
Twenty-five years after the cessation of local mining activity, the waters of the Mediterranean Sea are still contaminated... more
Underwater Volcano Creates Bubbles More Than a Quarter-Mile Across  LIVE SCIENCE · 6 days
In the early 20th century, sailors near Alaska reported seeing black bubbles seeming to boil out from the sea. They weren't wrong. more
NASA-NOAA satellite catches last burst before demise of Tropical Depression 17E  PHYS.ORG · 7 days
NASA-NOAA's Suomi NPP satellite passed over Mexico and found two small areas of very strong thunderstorms near two different coastlines. One area was in Potential Tropical... more
3-D printed coral could help endangered reefs  SCIENCE DAILY · 7 days
Threats to coral reefs are everywhere -- rising water temperatures, ocean acidification, coral bleaching, fishing and other human activities. But new research shows that 3-D printed coral can provide a structural starter kit for... more
Germany calls crisis meet over Shell North Sea platforms  PHYS.ORG · 7 days
Germany said Wednesday it had called a special meeting of international partners this week to pressure Royal Dutch Shell to remove old rigs containing crude oil in the North Sea. more
What Is a Sea Cucumber?  LIVE SCIENCE · 7 days
Nope, these cucumbers aren't plants. Sea cucumbers are colorful, squishy sea creatures that live on the ocean floor. more
Venus May Never Have Been Wet and Warm World  SCI-NEWS.COM · 1 week
A team of planetary researchers from the Lunar and Planetary Institute (LPI) and elsewhere has found that a... more
Ocean's deep-water may be corroding Byron Bay's coastal ecosystems  PHYS.ORG · 7 days
Cold ocean waters, the sort that gives relief to beachgoers in the heat of summer, may in fact be corroding coastal ecosystems according to new research from Southern Cross University. more
Marine Biologists Discover Two New Species of Porcelain Crabs  SCI-NEWS.COM · 7 days
A duo of marine biologists from the Smithsonian Tropical Research Institute in Panama and the Justus-Liebig-Universität in Germany... more
Geologists reveal anoxia caused loss in biodiversity in ancient seas  PHYS.ORG · 1 week
Since 2016, the researchers of the Department of Geology at Tallinn University of Technology have been engaged in a research project analyzing the causes of Silurian biodiversity crisis.... more
Two new porcelain crab species discovered  PHYS.ORG · 1 week
Two new porcelain crab species have been described in the ZooKeys journal by scientists from the Smithsonian Tropical Research Institute (STRI) and the Institut fur Tierokologie und Spezielle Zoologie der Justus-Liebig-Universitat Giessen. One of the new... more
Two new porcelain crab species discovered  SCIENCE DAILY · 1 week
Two new symbiotic porcelain crab species have been described. One of them, from the South China Sea of Vietnam, inhabits the compact tube-like shelters built by the polychaete worm with other organisms. The other inhabits the... more
NASA's Terra satellite catches a glimpse of a fleeting Ema  PHYS.ORG · 1 week
Tropical Storm Ema had a very short life, but NASA's Terra satellite caught a glimpse of the storm before it dissipated in the Central Pacific Ocean. more
NASA provides a farewell infrared view of extra-tropical storm Melissa  PHYS.ORG · 1 week
NASA's Suomi NPP satellite passed over North Atlantic Ocean on Oct. 14 and provided forecasters with an infrared view of Tropical Storm Melissa that revealed wind shear was... more
Strong storms generating earthquake-like seismic activity  SCIENCE DAILY · 1 week
Researcher have uncovered a new geophysical phenomenon where a hurricane or other strong storm can spark seismic events in the nearby ocean as strong as a 3.5 magnitude earthquake. more
Achieving a safe and just future for the ocean economy  PHYS.ORG · 1 week
The economic potential of the oceans is expected to double from US$1.5 trillion in 2010 to US$3 trillion by 2030. Yet managing this growth should be undertaken in... more
Strong storms generating earthquake-like seismic activity  PHYS.ORG · 1 week
A Florida State University researcher has uncovered a new geophysical phenomenon where a hurricane or other strong storm can spark seismic events in the nearby ocean as strong as a 3.5 magnitude earthquake. more
Many cooks don't spoil the broth: Manifold symbionts prepare the host for any eventuality  SCIENCE DAILY · 1 week
Deep-sea mussels, which rely on symbiotic bacteria for food, harbor a surprisingly high diversity of these bacterial 'cooks': Up to... more
Achieving a safe and just future for the ocean economy  SCIENCE DAILY · 1 week
much attention has been given to the growth of the 'Blue Economy' -- a term which refers to the sustainable use of ocean and marine resources for economic... more
New research suggests global ice age changed the face of the planet  PHYS.ORG · 1 week
Curtin University researchers have discovered that a global ice age more than 600 million years ago dramatically altered the face of the planet, leaving... more
The makeup of mariculture: Global trends in seafood farming  SCIENCE DAILY · 1 week
The process of farming seafood in the ocean, known as mariculture, is a growing trend yet little is known about the trajectories of its development. That's why a team of... more
New study on human-clam relationships informs modern marine resource management  PHYS.ORG · 1 week
A new study on the long-term relationship between humans and clams in B.C."s Salish Sea is helping to inform modern marine resource management. more
Mussels harbor strains of bacteria in their gills, keeping them prepared for environmental changes  PHYS.ORG · 1 week
Deep-sea mussels, which rely on cooperative symbiotic bacteria for their food, harbor a surprisingly high diversity of these bacterial "cooks":... more
Marshall Islands, low-lying US ally and nuclear testing site, declares a climate crisis  PHYS.ORG · 1 week
The Marshall Islands, a low-lying chain of atolls and key U.S. ally in the Central Pacific, has declared a national climate crisis... more
Clay minerals call the shots with carbon  PHYS.ORG · 1 week
Clay minerals suspended in seawater binds sedimentary organic carbon to their mineral surfaces. But the quantity of carbon that is bound and the source of that carbon very much depends on the clay mineral... more
Hubble snaps spiral's profile  PHYS.ORG · 1 week
The NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope sees galaxies of all shapes, sizes, luminosities and orientations in the cosmos. Sometimes, the telescope gazes at a galaxy oriented sideways—as shown here. The spiral galaxy featured in this Hubble image is called NGC 3717,... more
Under the sea: Study reveals secret building blocks of northern algae  PHYS.ORG · 1 week
New research from U of T 's Mississauga and Scarborough campuses reveals fascinating secrets about the complex structure of a marine organism found around the globe.... more
Best way to protect ocean fisheries? Let nations profit from them  PHYS.ORG · 1 week
Overfishing is a major problem for the world's oceans, but a strategy adopted nearly 50 years ago has helped protect fisheries: giving nations exclusive rights to... more
New tool enables Nova Scotia lobster fishery to address impacts of climate change  SCIENCE DAILY · 2 weeks
Researchers use long-term survey data sets and climate models to help fishing communities plan for a warmer ocean. Researchers have developed a... more
New tool enables Nova Scotia lobster fishery to address impacts of climate change  PHYS.ORG · 2 weeks
U.S. and Canadian researchers have developed a tool that incorporates projected changes in ocean climate onto a geographic fishery management area. Now... more
CO2 emissions cause lost labor productivity, research shows  PHYS.ORG · 2 weeks
The planet's warming climate has led to countless changes that are affecting all of us. Droughts, hurricanes, rising sea levels and forest fires—all are now regular events in a world that saw... more
Food comas and long-term memories: New research points to an appetizing connection  SCIENCE DAILY · 2 weeks
There may be a connection between food comas -- resting after eating -- and the formation of long-term memories, a team of neuroscientists concludes... more
NASA-NOAA's Suomi NPP satellite needed 3 orbits to see all of Super Typhoon Hagibis  PHYS.ORG · 2 weeks
NASA-NOAA's Suomi NPP satellite provided forecasters with a composite visible image of the very large Super Typhoon Hagibis in the... more
Warm ocean water attacking edges of Antarctica's ice shelves  SCIENCE DAILY · 2 weeks
Upside-down 'rivers' of warm ocean water are eroding the fractured edges of thick, floating Antarctic ice shelves from below, helping to create conditions that lead to ice-shelf breakup and sea-level... more
Offering solutions to Ice Age ocean chemistry puzzle  PHYS.ORG · 2 weeks
New research into the chemistry of the oceans during ice ages is helping to solve a puzzle that has engaged scientists for more than two decades. more
Solution to Ice Age ocean chemistry puzzle  SCIENCE DAILY · 2 weeks
New research into the chemistry of the oceans during ice ages is helping to solve a puzzle that has engaged scientists for more than two decades. At issue is how much of the CO2... more
Online prototype could improve ocean migratory species governance  PHYS.ORG · 2 weeks
An online mapping and knowledge platform prototype could soon offer free and easily accessible information on the migratory patterns of endangered species in the ocean. more
Infectious disease in marine life linked to decades of ocean warming  SCIENCE DAILY · 2 weeks
New research shows that long-term changes in diseases in ocean species coincides with decades of widespread environmental change. more
Sunlight degrades polystyrene faster than expected  PHYS.ORG · 2 weeks
A study published by researchers at Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution (WHOI) shows that polystyrene, one of the world's most ubiquitous plastics, may degrade in decades or centuries when exposed to sunlight, rather than thousands of years... more
Stormy waters ahead for coastal towns: what are the options?  PHYS.ORG · 2 weeks
Australians love property and being near water. But fast forward 30 years and the two may be incompatible, judging by global forecasts warning of sea level rises that... more
For sea creatures, baseline shows disease as sentinel of change  PHYS.ORG · 2 weeks
The health of Earth's oceans is rapidly worsening, and newly published Cornell-led research has examined changes in reported diseases across undersea species at a global scale over a... more
Warm ocean water attacking edges of Antarctica's ice shelves  PHYS.ORG · 2 weeks
Upside-down "rivers" of warm ocean water are eroding the fractured edges of thick, floating Antarctic ice shelves from below, helping to create conditions that lead to ice-shelf breakup and sea-level... more
Troughs developed in ice-stream shear margins precondition ice shelves for ocean-driven breakup  Science Magazine · 2 weeks
Floating ice shelves of fast-flowing ice streams are prone to rift initiation and calving originating along zones of rapid shearing at their margins. Predicting... more
Global analysis of submarine canyons may shed light on Martian landscapes  PHYS.ORG · 2 weeks
Submarine canyons are a final frontier on planet Earth. There are thousands of these breathtaking geological features hidden within the depths of the ocean—yet scientists have... more
Grim projections for the ocean—and the life within it  PHYS.ORG · 2 weeks
The chain of causation that connects rising concentrations of greenhouse gases in the atmosphere to the marine biota has been made clearer by the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC)... more
Can oceans turn the tide on the climate crisis?  PHYS.ORG · 2 weeks
As we pump more greenhouse gases into the atmosphere, the world is warming at an alarming rate, with devastating consequences. While our vast oceans are helping to take the heat... more
From Med's biggest nesting ground, turtles swim to uncertain future  PHYS.ORG · 2 weeks
Freed from its eggshell by a volunteer, the tiny turtle hatchling clambers across a pebble-strewn sandy Greek beach in a race to the sea, the start of a... more
The deeper these octopuses live, the wartier their skin  SCIENCE DAILY · 2 weeks
Deep beneath the ocean's surface, surprisingly cute pink octopuses creep along the seafloor. Some of them have super warty skin, and some are smooth. Scientists weren't sure if these octopuses... more
The deeper these octopuses live, the wartier their skin  PHYS.ORG · 2 weeks
Deep beneath the ocean's surface, surprisingly cute warty pink octopuses creep along the seafloor. But not all these octopuses look alike. While we humans love a good "Is your skin... more
Dual approach needed to save sinking cities and bleaching corals  SCIENCE DAILY · 2 weeks
Local conservation can boost the climate resilience of coastal ecosystems, species and cities and buy them time in their fight against sea-level rise, ocean acidification and warming temperatures,... more
Controlling robots across oceans and space  PHYS.ORG · 2 weeks
This Autumn is seeing a number of experiments controlling robots from afar, with ESA astronaut Luca Parmitano directing a robot in The Netherlands and engineers in Germany controlling a rover in Canada. more
Researchers find global ocean methane emissions dominated by shallow coastal waters  PHYS.ORG · 2 weeks
Methane is a potent greenhouse gas that is being added to the atmosphere through both natural processes and human activities, such as energy production and agriculture. more
Can oceans turn the tide on the climate crisis?  ESA · 2 weeks
As we pump more greenhouse gases into the atmosphere, the world is warming at an alarming rate, with... more
Dual approach needed to save sinking cities and bleaching corals  PHYS.ORG · 2 weeks
Local conservation can boost the climate resilience of coastal ecosystems, species and cities and buy them precious time in their fight against sea-level rise, ocean acidification and warming... more
Archaea hold clues to ancient ocean temperatures  PHYS.ORG · 2 weeks
Solving a decades-old mystery, Stanford researchers have discovered proteins that enable hardy microbes called archaea to toughen up their membranes when waters are overly warm. Finding these proteins could help scientists piece together the... more
Medical News Today: How whales and dolphins evolved for life at sea  MNT · 2 weeks
New research identifies 85 genes, the loss of which may have allowed whales, dolphins, and other cetaceans to adapt to life in an aquatic... more
Matryoshka-inspired hierarchically structured triboelectric nanogenerators for wave energy harvesting  nanowerk · 2 weeks
Ocean wave energy is an abundant resource of clean energy. However, having been explored for decades, there is still lacking efficient and economical technologies to convert water wave energy into... more
New method gives first global picture of mutual predictability of atmosphere and ocean  PHYS.ORG · 2 weeks
University of Maryland (UMD) scientists have carried out a novel statistical analysis to determine for the first time a global picture of... more
New method gives first global picture of mutual predictability of atmosphere and ocean  SCIENCE DAILY · 2 weeks
Scientists have carried out a novel statistical analysis to determine for the first time a global picture of how the ocean helps... more
Was Venus once warm and wet? New study of lava flow suggests not  PHYS.ORG · 2 weeks
A new study of the Ovda Fluctus lava flow on Venus indicates that it is made of basaltic lava. This discovery weakens... more
Proximity to paths and roads is a burden for white-tailed sea eagles  SCIENCE DAILY · 2 weeks
A research team has now measured concentrations of the hormone corticosterone and its metabolic products in white-tailed sea eagles in northern Germany and correlated... more
A fortress of ice and snow  PHYS.ORG · 2 weeks
After only a few days of searching, experts from the MOSAiC expedition have now found a suitable ice floe where they will set up the research camp for their one-year-long drift through the Arctic Ocean. Consequently,... more
Successful ocean-monitoring satellite mission ends  PHYS.ORG · 2 weeks
The Jason-2/Ocean Surface Topography Mission (OSTM), the third in a U.S.-European series of satellite missions designed to measure sea surface height, successfully ended its science mission on Oct. 1. NASA and its mission partners made the decision to... more
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