Oceans
Sea level rise could reshape the United States, trigger migration inland  SCIENCE DAILY · 12 hours
New study is the first to use machine learning to project migration patterns resulting from sea-level rise. Researchers found the impact of rising oceans will ripple... more
Deep diving scientists discover bubbling CO2 hotspot  PHYS.ORG · 12 hours
Diving 200 feet under the ocean surface to conduct scientific research can lead to some interesting places. For University of Texas at Austin Professor Bayani Cardenas, it placed him in the middle of a... more
Inner complexity of Saturn moon, Enceladus, revealed  SCIENCE DAILY · 14 hours
A team developed a new geochemical model that reveals that carbon dioxide (CO2) from within Enceladus, an ocean-harboring moon of Saturn, may be controlled by chemical reactions at its seafloor. Studying the plume of... more
Quo vadis Antarctic bottom water?  PHYS.ORG · 14 hours
Ocean currents are essential for the global distribution of heat and thus also for climate on earth. For example, oxygen is transferred into the deep sea through the formation of new deep water around Antarctica. Weddell Sea sourced... more
Most rehabilitating sea turtles with infectious tumors don't survive  SCIENCE DAILY · 13 hours
Fibropapillomatosis (FP) is the most significant infectious disease affecting sea turtle populations worldwide. FB leads to tumors on the turtles' eyes, flippers and internal organs and is widespread in warmer... more
Sea level rise could reshape the United States, trigger migration inland  PHYS.ORG · 13 hours
When Hurricane Harvey slammed into the Texas coast in 2017, displaced residents flocked inland, trying to rebuild their lives in the disaster's aftermath. Within decades, the... more
Quo vadis Antarctic bottom water?  SCIENCE DAILY · 15 hours
The formation of deep water, which is an important component of the climate system, takes place in only a few parts of the ocean: In the subpolar North Atlantic and in a few places in the Southern Hemisphere.... more
Deep-sea osmolyte makes biomolecular machines heat-tolerant  SCIENCE DAILY · 14 hours
Researchers have discovered a method to control biomolecular machines over a wide temperature range using deep-sea osmolyte trimethylamine N-oxide (TMAO). This finding could open a new dimension in the application of artificial machines fabricated from biomolecular... more
New models reveal inner complexity of Saturn moon  PHYS.ORG · 17 hours
A Southwest Research Institute team developed a new geochemical model that reveals that carbon dioxide (CO2) from within Enceladus, an ocean-harboring moon of Saturn, may be controlled by chemical reactions at its... more
Deep-sea osmolyte makes biomolecular machines heat-tolerant  PHYS.ORG · 18 hours
Researchers have discovered a method to control biomolecular machines over a wide temperature range using deep-sea osmolyte trimethylamine N-oxide (TMAO). This finding could open a new dimension in the application of artificial machines fabricated from biomolecular... more
Most rehabilitating sea turtles with infectious tumors don't survive  PHYS.ORG · 17 hours
Caused by a herpesvirus, fibropapillomatosis (FP) is the most significant infectious disease affecting sea turtle populations worldwide. It is widespread in warmer climates like Florida, where almost 70 percent of... more
Corals' partnership with microalgae helps in stressful times but there's a trade-off  PHYS.ORG · 2 days
In the warmer and brighter shallow waters of Kāne'ohe Bay, O'ahu, the Hawaiian rice coral (Montipora capitata) hosts more heat-tolerant symbiotic microalgae in their... more
Adidas bets on recycled material 'to combat ocean plastic'  PHYS.ORG · 2 days
German sportswear giant Adidas said Tuesday more than half of the polyester used in its products this year would come from recycled material, including millions of shoes made from plastic... more
Arctic sea ice can't 'bounce back'  SCIENCE DAILY · 2 days
Arctic sea ice cannot 'quickly bounce back' if climate change causes it to melt, new research suggests. more
The little auks that lived in the Pacific  PHYS.ORG · 2 days
Findings from a 700,000-year-old fossil bone indicate that a close relative of the most abundant seabird species in the North Atlantic, the modern dovekie, or 'little auk,' used to thrive in the... more
The politics and cost of adapting to climate change in New York City  PHYS.ORG · 2 days
This past week the New York Times reported on a set of studies now underway by the U.S. Corps of Engineers of... more
Warmer and acidified oceans can lead to 'hidden' changes in species behavior  SCIENCE DAILY · 2 days
Scientists have shown that the peppery furrow shell (Scrobicularia plana) makes considerable changes to its feeding habits when faced with warmer and more acidified... more
Arctic sea ice can't 'bounce back'  PHYS.ORG · 2 days
Arctic sea ice cannot "quickly bounce back" if climate change causes it to melt, new research suggests. more
New study reveals a life aquatic for many spider species  PHYS.ORG · 2 days
From sea shores to salt flats, a high incidence of spiders spin a life in or around water. Researchers at the California Academy of Sciences and William Paterson... more
Warmer and acidified oceans can lead to 'hidden' changes in species behavior  PHYS.ORG · 2 days
Projected ocean warming and acidification not only impacts the behavior of individual species but also the wider marine ecosystems which are influenced by them,... more
Crucial reef species may survive ocean changes under climate change  PHYS.ORG · 2 days
A seaweed species crucial to the survival of coral reefs may be able to gain resistance to ocean changes caused by climate change, new Te Herenga Waka—Victoria University... more
Iceye releases dark vessel detection product  SPACE NEWS · 3 days
Radar satellite operator Iceye released a product to detect dark vessels, ships at sea that are not identifying themselves with Automatic Identification System transponders.... more
Miami sets ambitious emissions goal: carbon neutral by 2050. How to get there isn't clear  PHYS.ORG · 3 days
With sea level rise already lapping at its door, the city of Miami made its first significant commitment... more
Scientists were stumped when seabirds started dying. Now they have answers  PHYS.ORG · 3 days
In the fall of 2015, two years into a heatwave in the Pacific Ocean colloquially known as "the Blob," an unusually large influx of common murres,... more
Measuring sulfur with satellites  PHYS.ORG · 3 days
Seagoing vessels may emit fewer and fewer harmful substances, but how do you measure whether they comply with the standards? The Dutch Environment and Transport Inspectorate (ILT) and the universities of Leiden and Wageningen are starting a joint study to... more
Rough seas delay escape test for SpaceX crew capsule  PHYS.ORG · 5 days
Rough seas prompted SpaceX on Saturday to delay the emergency escape test of its new crew capsule by a day. more
A Hot Blob in the Pacific Ocean Caused 1 Million Seabirds to Die  LIVE SCIENCE · 5 days
Five years ago, tens of thousands of emaciated seabirds washed ashore on the Pacific Coast. more
Out of Deep-Sea Mud, a Strange Blob May Hold Secrets to the Origins of Complex Life  LIVE SCIENCE · 6 days
This unassuming little critter may hold the secrets to how the first multicellular life-forms evolved. more
NASA water vapor imagery shows Tino's heavy rain potential over Fiji  PHYS.ORG · 6 days
When NASA's Aqua satellite passed over the Southern Pacific Ocean it gathered water vapor data that provided information about the intensity of Tropical Cyclone Tino. more
Sea lions: Cash cows in the Bay Area, but farther south, fishermen say 'Shoot 'em'  PHYS.ORG · 6 days
Sea lions are increasingly living in parallel universes along the California coast, a disparity best observed amid the... more
Image: Japanese archipelago and the western Pacific Ocean  PHYS.ORG · 6 days
The Copernicus Sentinel-3 mission takes us over the Japanese archipelago—a string of islands that extends about 3000 km into the western Pacific Ocean. more
Sea lions yawn due to anxiety  PHYS.ORG · 6 days
Researchers have analysed these animals for 14 months, concluding that the frequency of their yawns increases immediately after a social conflict among members of the group. more
Fins and limbs tell evolutionary tale  PHYS.ORG · 6 days
About 400 million years ago, our early ancestors took their first hesitant steps out of the primordial seas on to land. more
Japanese archipelago  ESA · 6 days
Image: The Copernicus Sentinel-3 mission takes us over the Japanese archipelago – a string of islands that extends about 3000 km into the western Pacific Ocean.While the archipelago is made up of... more
Mobile protected areas needed to protect biodiversity in the high seas  SCIENCE DAILY · 6 days
As the United Nations rewrites the laws of the high seas, the new document should anticipate emerging technologies that allow protected areas to move as animals... more
Neanderthals Dived into Mediterranean Sea for Clam Shells  SCI-NEWS.COM · 6 days
Shell fishing was a common activity of Neanderthals, according to new research led by University of Colorado, Boulder archaeologists. In... more
Mobile protected areas needed to protect biodiversity in the high seas  PHYS.ORG · 7 days
World leaders are currently updating the laws for international waters that apply to most of the world's ocean environment. This provides a unique opportunity, marine scientists... more
Fossil is the oldest-known scorpion  SCIENCE DAILY · 7 days
Scientists studying fossils collected 35 years ago have identified them as the oldest-known scorpion species, a prehistoric animal from about 437 million years ago. The researchers found that the animal likely had the capacity to breathe in both... more
Researchers Sequence Genome of Elusive Giant Squid  SCI-NEWS.COM · 7 days
An international team of scientists has sequenced the genome of the giant squid (Architeuthis dux), the species which has inspired generations to tell... more
Cyanobacteria in water and on land identified as source of methane  SCIENCE DAILY · 7 days
Cyanobacteria, also known as blue-green algae, are among the most common organisms on Earth. A research team has now shown for the first time that Cyanobacteria... more
Fossil is the oldest-known scorpion  PHYS.ORG · 7 days
Scientists studying fossils collected 35 years ago have identified them as the oldest-known scorpion species, a prehistoric animal from about 437 million years ago. The researchers found that the animal likely had the capacity to breathe in both... more
NASA catches the dissipation of Tropical Cyclone Claudia  PHYS.ORG · 7 days
Tropical Cyclone Claudia was dissipating in the Southern Indian Ocean when NASA's Terra satellite captured a visible image of storm as it flew overhead in its orbit around the Earth. more
Worst marine heatwave on record killed one million seabirds in North Pacific Ocean  PHYS.ORG · 7 days
The common guillemot (known as the common murre in North America) breeds in both the Pacific and the Atlantic and is among... more
How much microplastic is there in your laundry basket?  PHYS.ORG · 7 days
Every time you wash clothes, you are releasing microplastics into the sea, but we know little about the amount and distribution of such material from different types of textile. Research... more
Experts say Med Sea altered by Suez Canal's invasive species  PHYS.ORG · 7 days
As Egypt marks the 150th anniversary of the opening of the Suez Canal, marine biologists are bemoaning one of the famed waterway's lesser known legacies—the invasion of hundreds... more
Solar-powered barge a key 'interceptor' for plastic waste  PHYS.ORG · 7 days
Scooping waste from a Malaysian river to stop it reaching the sea, a solar-powered barge named the "Interceptor" is the latest weapon in a global battle to rid the world's waters of... more
Discovery reveals how remora fishes know when to hitch a ride aboard their hosts  PHYS.ORG · 1 week
Remoras are among the most successful marine hitchhikers, thanks to powerful suction discs that allow them to stay tightly fastened... more
NOAA signals strong appetite for radio occultation  SPACE NEWS · 1 week
The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration seeks to dramatically increase the supply of radio occultation soundings it feeds into weather forecast models.... more
Discovery reveals how remora fishes know when to hitch a ride aboard their hosts  SCIENCE DAILY · 1 week
Researchers have detailed the discovery of a tactile-sensory system stowed within the suction disc of remora, believed to enable the... more
Deep-sea microbe sheds light on primordial evolutionary milestone  REUTERS · 1 week
A microorganism scooped up in deep-sea mud off Japan's coast has helped scientists unlock the mystery of one of the... more
NASA, NOAA analyses reveal 2019 second warmest year on record  PHYS.ORG · 1 week
According to independent analyses by NASA and the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), Earth's global surface temperatures in 2019 were the second warmest since modern recordkeeping began... more
'The blob,' food supply squeeze to blame for largest seabird die-off  SCIENCE DAILY · 1 week
When nearly one million common murres died at sea and washed ashore from California to Alaska in 2015 and 2016, it was unprecedented -- both for... more
Beach-combing Neanderthals dove for shells  PHYS.ORG · 1 week
Did Neanderthals wear swimsuits? Probably not. But a new study suggests that some of these ancient humans might have spent a lot of time at the beach. They may even have dived into the cool waters of the... more
NASA, NOAA analyses reveal 2019 second warmest year on record  SCIENCE DAILY · 1 week
According to independent analyses by NASA and the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), Earth's global surface temperatures in 2019 were the second warmest since modern recordkeeping began... more
Meet the narwhal, 'unicorn of the sea'  PHYS.ORG · 1 week
Narwhals are often called the unicorns of the sea. The long tusk of the male narwhal sets these whales apart, but it's not the only thing that makes Monodon monoceros among the most intriguing... more
Rising sea temperatures could threaten Atlantic salmon production  PHYS.ORG · 1 week
In 2017, aquaculture production in the EU reached a decade high thanks to increased production of high-value species like salmon and seabass, according to a report by the European Market Observatory for... more
Robotic gripping mechanism mimics how sea anemones catch prey  SCIENCE DAILY · 1 week
Researchers demonstrated a robotic gripping mechanism that mimics how a sea anemone catches its prey. The bionic torus captures and releases objects by crimping its skin. The grasper not only... more
Scientists contribute to major new report on climate change impact on UK coasts and seas  PHYS.ORG · 1 week
University scientists have contributed to a major new publication by the Marine Climate Change Impacts Partnership (MCCIP) which... more
Scientists highlight effects of climate change on UK's plankton  PHYS.ORG · 1 week
Marine scientists in Plymouth have led a major study highlighting the effects of climate change on the plankton populations in UK seas. more
Old fishing hooks are severe hazards for sharks  PHYS.ORG · 1 week
Startling data fresh off an eight-year tiger shark study in French Polynesia shows severe impacts the creatures of the sea face long after they are cut loose from fishing lines. more
Rising sea levels and increased storms pose threat to coastal communities  PHYS.ORG · 1 week
The rate of coastal erosion around the UK is expected to increase substantially in the future, according to a new study by the University of Plymouth. more
Study weighs deep-sea mining's impact on microbes  PHYS.ORG · 1 week
The essential roles that microbes play in deep-sea ecosystems are at risk from the potential environmental impacts of mining, a new paper in Limnology and Oceanography reports. The study reviews what is known about... more
New Bone-Eating Life Form Discovered in Bizarre Alligator-Corpse Study  LIVE SCIENCE · 1 week
Scientists sank three alligator corpses into the Gulf of Mexico to see whether bottom-dwelling sea creatures could eat them. They did — handily. more
Deep-sea mining's impact on microbes  SCIENCE DAILY · 1 week
The essential roles that microbes play in deep-sea ecosystems are at risk from the potential environmental impacts of mining, a new article reports. The study reviews what is known about microbes in these environments and assesses how mining... more
Robotic gripping mechanism mimics how sea anemones catch prey  PHYS.ORG · 1 week
Most robotic gripping mechanisms to date have relied on humanlike fingers or appendages, which sometimes struggle to provide the fine touch, flexibility or cost-effectiveness needed in some circumstances to hold... more
Robotic gripping mechanism mimics how sea anemones catch prey  nanowerk · 1 week
The doughnut-shaped, plastic rubber device crimps its skin to latch onto anything from cloth to beakers filled with liquid. more
Ocean Temperatures Have Reached a Record-Breaking High  LIVE SCIENCE · 1 week
Our planet's oceans are warmer than they've ever been in recorded human history. more
How nodules stay on top at the bottom of the sea  SCIENCE DAILY · 1 week
Rare metallic elements found in clumps on the deep-ocean floor mysteriously remain uncovered despite the shifting sands and sediment many leagues under the sea. Scientists now... more
Sea urchins could prove to be Rhode Island's next climate-resilient crop  PHYS.ORG · 1 week
Atlantic purple sea urchins are common in coastal waters along the East Coast, and University of Rhode Island scientist Coleen Suckling thinks the Ocean State could... more
Oceans were hottest on record in 2019  PHYS.ORG · 1 week
The world's oceans were the hottest in recorded history in 2019, scientists said on Tuesday, as manmade emissions warmed seas at an ever-increasing rate with potentially disastrous impacts on Earth's climate. more
How nodules stay on top at the bottom of the sea  PHYS.ORG · 1 week
Boulder, Colo., USA: Rare metallic elements found in clumps on the deep-ocean floor mysteriously remain uncovered despite the shifting sands and sediment many leagues under the... more
Protect 30% of planet by 2030: UN Nature rescue plan  PHYS.ORG · 1 week
Thirty percent of Earth's surface across land and sea should become protected areas by 2030 to ensure the viability of ecosystems essential to human wellbeing, according to a... more
NOAA set to update space weather fleet  SPACE NEWS · 1 week
The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration is preparing to update its aging space weather fleet. SpaceNews.com more
Climate gas budgets highly overestimate methane discharge from Arctic Ocean  SCIENCE DAILY · 1 week
There is a huge seasonal variability in methane seeps in the Arctic Ocean, according to a new article. more
NASA tracking Tropical Storm Claudia battling wind shear  PHYS.ORG · 1 week
Tropical Storm Claudia is battling wind shear as it continues moving away from Western Australia and through the Southern Indian Ocean. NASA-NOAA's Suomi NPP satellite provided forecasters with an image of the... more
Climate gas budgets highly overestimate methane discharge from Arctic Ocean  PHYS.ORG · 1 week
The atmospheric concentration of methane, a potent greenhouse gas, has almost tripled since the beginning of industrialisation. Methane emissions from natural sources are poorly understood. This is especially... more
Future subtropical warming accelerates tropical climate change  SCIENCE DAILY · 1 week
In response to future fossil fuel burning, climate computer models simulate a pronounced warming in the tropical oceans. This warming can influence the El Niño phenomenon and shift weather and rainfall patterns across the... more
Future subtropical warming accelerates tropical climate change  PHYS.ORG · 1 week
In response to future fossil fuel burning, climate computer models simulate a pronounced warming in the tropical oceans. This warming can influence the El Niño phenomenon and shift weather and rainfall patterns across the... more
Arabian Peninsula a trap for summer dust  PHYS.ORG · 1 week
Intense winds blowing from Africa through a mountainous gap on the western Red Sea coast have led to a buildup of summer dust over the Arabian Peninsula in the past decade. This increasing dust... more
Atlantic circulation collapse could cut British crop farming  PHYS.ORG · 1 week
Crop production in Britain will fall dramatically if climate change causes the collapse of a vital pattern of ocean currents, new research suggests. more
Can an underwater soundtrack really bring coral reefs back to life?  PHYS.ORG · 1 week
The ocean is a vast, quiet place, right? Vast, yes; quiet, not so much. more
Cracks in Arctic sea ice turn low clouds on and off  SCIENCE DAILY · 2 weeks
The prevailing view has been that more leads are associated with more low-level clouds during winter. But an atmospheric scientists noticed something strange in their study... more
Historic German island is nursery for North Sea seals  PHYS.ORG · 2 weeks
The birthplace of Germany's national anthem and a practice bombing range for British airmen after World War II, Helgoland island in the North Sea turns cuddly at the turn of... more
Image: Faroe Islands as sen from Copernicus Sentinel-2  PHYS.ORG · 2 weeks
The Copernicus Sentinel-2 mission takes us over the Faroe Islands, located halfway between Iceland and Norway in the North Atlantic Ocean. The Faroe Islands are an archipelago made up of 18 jagged... more
Earth from Space: Faroe Islands  ESA · 2 weeks
Video: 00:02:37 This week's edition of the Earth from Space programme features a Copernicus Sentinel-2 image over the Faroe Islands – located halfway between Iceland and... more
Faroe Islands  ESA · 2 weeks
Image: The Copernicus Sentinel-2 mission takes us over the Faroe Islands, located halfway between Iceland and Norway in the North Atlantic Ocean. The Faroe Islands are an archipelago made up of 18... more
Cracks in Arctic sea ice turn low clouds on and off  PHYS.ORG · 2 weeks
The prevailing view has been that more leads are associated with more low-level clouds during winter. But University of Utah atmospheric scientists noticed something strange in... more
The 97 kms between China and mastery of the Mekong  PHYS.ORG · 2 weeks
Ninety-seven kilometres of rocks in Thai waters stand between Beijing and dominance over the Mekong, a mighty river that feeds millions as it threads south from the Tibetan... more
New assessment method reveals many fish stocks are in urgent need of sustainable management  PHYS.ORG · 2 weeks
A newly developed method for assessing how abundant fish populations are and how fishing is affecting them revealed that several... more
About 300 sea turtles die in Mexico from red tide  PHYS.ORG · 2 weeks
Mexican environmental authorities said Thursday that 292 sea turtles found dead on the country's southern Pacific coast since Christmas died as a result of a red tide algae... more
Large 'herbivores of the sea' help keep coral reefs healthy  PHYS.ORG · 2 weeks
Selective fishing can disrupt the delicate balance maintained between corals and algae in embattled Caribbean coral reefs. Removing large parrotfish, which graze on algae like large land mammals... more
Large 'herbivores of the sea' help keep coral reefs healthy  SCIENCE DAILY · 2 weeks
Selective fishing can disrupt the delicate balance maintained between corals and algae in embattled Caribbean coral reefs. more
WHOI underwater robot takes first-known automated sample from ocean  PHYS.ORG · 2 weeks
WHOI's robot, Nereid Under Ice (NUI), samples a patch of sediment from the mineral-rich floor of Kolumbo volcano off Santorini Island, Greece. This is the first known automated sample taken... more
Can sea star movement inspire better robots?  nanowerk · 2 weeks
What researchers uncovered about sea star locomotion could help scientists design simpler, decentralized systems in robotics and beyond. more
Debunking previous studies that say tropical fish are behaving oddly  SCIENCE DAILY · 2 weeks
Biologists help debunk previous studies that say tropical fish are behaving oddly as oceans gets more acidic due to climate change. more
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