A transparent, stretchable triboelectric nanogenerator (TENG) with area up to 12 cm x 12 cm and power output 8 Watts per square metre, has been realized by Nagoya University researchers using a carbon nanotube thin film (CNT film) as one of the TENG's electrodes. The CNT film was formed using a simple cost-effective and scalable spray-coating method, and applied, as proof-of-concept, to self-powered optical wireless communication sheets and gloves that also power blue LEDs. The work was reported... PHYS.ORG · 1 month
Creating stretchable thermoelectric generators  SCIENCE DAILY · 2 weeks
For the first time, a soft and stretchable organic thermoelectric module has been created that can harvest energy from body heat. The breakthrough was enabled by a new composite material that may have widespread use in smart clothing, wearable electronics... more
Creating stretchable thermoelectric generators  PHYS.ORG · 2 weeks
For the first time, a soft and stretchable organic thermoelectric module has been created that can harvest energy from body heat. The breakthrough was enabled by a new composite material that may have widespread use in smart clothing, wearable electronics... more
Stretchable supercapacitors to power tomorrow's wearable devices  SCIENCE DAILY · 3 weeks
Researchers have engineered a novel type of supercapacitor that maintains full functionality even when stretched to eight times its original size. It does not exhibit any wear and tear from being stretched thousands of... more
Stretchable supercapacitors to power tomorrow's wearable devices  nanowerk · 3 weeks
Researchers demonstrate robust supercapacitors that still work when stretched to 8 times their original size. more
Wearable strain sensor based on optical transmittance of a CNT-embedded elastomer  nanowerk · 2 weeks
Rsearchers have developed a novel wearable strain sensor based on the modulation of optical transmittance of a carbon nanotube (CNT)-embedded elastomer. The sensor is capable of... more
Stretchable supercapacitors to power tomorrow's wearable devices  PHYS.ORG · 3 weeks
Researchers at Duke University and Michigan State University have engineered a novel type of supercapacitor that remains fully functional even when stretched to eight times its original size. It does not exhibit any wear... more
Breath figure-derived porous semiconducting films for organic electronics  Science Magazine · 2 weeks
Porous semiconductor film morphologies facilitate fluid diffusion and mass transport into the charge-carrying layers of diverse electronic devices. Here, we report the nature-inspired fabrication of several porous organic semiconductor-insulator blend films [semiconductor:... more
E. coli "super-contaminates" narrow ducts fostered by broad run-time distribution  Science Magazine · 4 weeks
One notable feature of bacterial motion is their ability to swim upstream along corners and crevices, by leveraging hydrodynamic interactions. This motion through anatomic ducts or medical devices... more
Double-walled carbon nanotubes have electro-optical advantages  nanowerk · 2 weeks
One nanotube could be great for electronics applications, but there's new evidence that two could be tops. more
A wearable, freestanding electrochemical sensing system  PHYS.ORG · 2 weeks
In a new study published on Science Advances, Yichao Zhao and a research team in integrated bioelectronics and materials and engineering in the U.S. engineered a disposable, free-standing electrochemical sensing system (FESS). The FESS allowed them... more
Scientists develop inexpensive method to produce E-sail tethers  PHYS.ORG · 2 weeks
Thin metallic tethers for Coulomb drag devices that tow satellites and spacecraft can now be produced more easily than before. Scientists of the Finnish Meteorological Institute have developed a method to produce... more
Textile-fiber-embedded multiluminescent device for future wearable devices  nanowerk · 1 week
Researchers cross-inserted a new type of electrode made of fibers inside the light emitting layer unlike existing light emitting devices, through which they could develop a new light-emitting technology using an in-plane electric field... more
New study presents hygroscopic micro/nanolenses along carbon nanotube ion channels  nanowerk · 4 weeks
A novel technology, capable of analyzing nanomaterials in our daily lives with the use of common 'salt' has been developed. This allows various molecules to amplify up to... more
New study presents hygroscopic micro/nanolenses along carbon nanotube ion channels  PHYS.ORG · 4 weeks
A novel technology, capable of analyzing nanomaterials in our daily lives with the use of common 'salt' has been developed. This allows various molecules to amplify—up to hundreds... more
AI-powered shoes unlock the secrets of your sole  SCIENCE DAILY · 3 weeks
Researchers have developed an AI-powered, smart insole that instantly turns any shoe into a portable gait-analysis laboratory. more
New material developed could help clean energy revolution  SCIENCE DAILY · 2 weeks
Researchers developed a promising graphene-carbon nanotube catalyst, giving them better control over hugely important chemical reactions for producing green technology and clean energy. more
Atomic-scale insights into the interfacial instability of superlubricity in hydrogenated amorphous carbon films  Science Magazine · 2 weeks
The origin of instability or even disappearance of the superlubricity state in hydrogenated amorphous carbon (a-C:H) film in the presence of oxygen... more
Are gamma-ray bursts powered by a star's collapsing magnetic fields?  nanowerk · 1 day
Groundbreaking research suggests the brightest source of energy in the universe is powered by the collapse of a dying star's magnetic field. more
Team develops photosynthetic proteins for expanded solar energy conversion  PHYS.ORG · 2 weeks
A team of scientists, led by the University of Bristol, has developed a new photosynthetic protein system enabling an enhanced and more sustainable approach to solar-powered technological devices. more
Researchers map protein motion  PHYS.ORG · 1 month
Cornell structural biologists took a new approach to using a classic method of X-ray analysis to capture something the conventional method had never accounted for: the collective motion of proteins. And they did so by creating software to painstakingly stitch... more
X-rays reveal in situ crystal growth of lead-free perovskite solar panel materials  PHYS.ORG · 2 days
Lead-based perovskites are very promising materials for the production of solar panels. They efficiently turn light into electricity but they also present some major... more
Collective dynamics of active matter systems  SCIENCE DAILY · 4 weeks
A study provides new details about the collective motion of individual agents in a liquid-crystal-like system, which could help in better understanding bacterial colonies, structures and systems in the human body, and other forms of active... more
Scientists get first look at cause of 'slow motion' earthquakes  PHYS.ORG · 2 weeks
An international team of scientists has for the first time identified the conditions deep below the Earth's surface that lead to the triggering of so-called 'slow motion' earthquakes. more
Polymer films pass electron gun test  PHYS.ORG · 3 weeks
HSE researchers, jointly with colleagues from the RAN Institute of Organoelement Compounds and the RAN Institute of Physical Chemistry and Electrochemistry, have studied the properties of a polyarylene ether ketone-based copolymer (co-PAEK) for potential space applications.... more
Textile-fiber-embedded multiluminescent device for future wearable devices  PHYS.ORG · 1 week
Dr. Soon Moon Jeong's research team in the Division of Energy Technology at DGIST has developed a new structure of luminescence technology. This will enable the production of light-emitting elements that overcome the limitations... more
Waves in thin air with broad effects  PHYS.ORG · 3 weeks
Mars has a very thin atmosphere, with nearly one hundredth the density of ours on Earth, and gravity pulls with little more than one third of the strength we feel on our planet. As... more
How to get conductive gels to stick when wet  PHYS.ORG · 3 weeks
Polymers that are good conductors of electricity could be useful in biomedical devices, to help with sensing or electrostimulation, for example. But there has been a sticking point preventing their... more
Don't look to mature forests to soak up carbon dioxide emissions  PHYS.ORG · 6 hours
Research published today in Nature suggests mature forests are limited in their ability to absorb "extra" carbon as atmospheric carbon dioxide concentrations increase. These findings may... more
MORE SCIENCE VIDEO
Supply chain outlook: Why the situation varies by industry
PHYS.ORG
Creating stretchable thermoelectric generators
PHYS.ORG
Unearthing technical solutions for a low carbon future: Carbon capture and storage
PHYS.ORG
Device could 'hear' disease through structures housing cells
PHYS.ORG
Knowing why bacteria are great upstream swimmers may prevent serious infections
PHYS.ORG
What does COVID-19 do to the body?
NEWS MEDICAL
Making more MXene: Researchers unveil a scalable production system for the promising, 2-D nanomaterials
PHYS.ORG
To make ultra-black materials that won't weigh things down, consider the butterfly
PHYS.ORG
How the moon formed: New research sheds light on what happened
PHYS.ORG
Research produces most accurate 3-D images of 2-D materials
PHYS.ORG
FRESH SCIENCE