Structural rejuvenation of glasses not only provides fundamental insights into their complicated dynamics but also extends their practical applications. However, it is formidably challenging to rejuvenate a glass on very short time scales. Here, we present the first experimental evidence that a specially designed shock compression technique can rapidly rejuvenate metallic glasses to extremely high-enthalpy states within a very short time scale of about 365 ± 8 ns. By controlling the shock stress... Science Magazine · 4 weeks
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The metallic asteroid Psyche has mystified scientists because it is less dense than it should be, given its iron-nickel composition. Now, a new theory could explain Psyche's low density and metallic surface. more
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Undergraduate engineers advance shock wave mitigation research  PHYS.ORG · 4 days
A team of undergraduate engineers at UC San Diego has discovered a method that could make materials more resilient against massive shocks such as earthquakes or explosions. The students, conducting research in the structural... more
Deep magma ocean formation set the oxidation state of Earths mantle  Science Magazine · 3 weeks
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Extreme mangrove corals found on the Great Barrier Reef  SCIENCE DAILY · 3 weeks
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Europe warming faster than expected due to climate change  SCIENCE DAILY · 3 weeks
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Making and controlling crystals of light  SCIENCE DAILY · 1 week
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The challenge: Make and purify a medical isotope that must be used the same day  PHYS.ORG · 4 weeks
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Extreme wildfires threaten to turn boreal forests from carbon sinks to carbon sources  SCIENCE DAILY · 4 weeks
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Research finds extreme elitism, social hierarchy among Gab users  PHYS.ORG · 2 weeks
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