The paleoneurology team at the CENIEH has just published a cognitive archaeology paper on emotion and attention when handling Lower Paleolithic tools, in which around 50 volunteers participated... PHYS.ORG · 3 weeks
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Evidence of capuchin monkeys using tools 3000 years ago  PHYS.ORG · 4 weeks
A team of researchers affiliated with several institutions in Brazil and the U.K., has found evidence of capuchin monkeys using stone tools as far back as 3,000 years ago. In... more
Medical News Today: What are the signs of emotional abuse?  MNT · 2 days
Some signs of emotional abuse include controlling, shaming, blaming, and purposely humiliating another person. Emotional abuse can occur in many situations. Learn more about the signs, as well... more
What are the signs of emotional abuse?  MNT · 2 days
Some signs of emotional abuse include controlling, shaming, blaming, and purposely humiliating another person. Emotional abuse can occur in many situations. Learn more about the signs, as well as what to do, here. more
Stone tool changes may show how Mesolithic hunter-gatherers responded to changing climate  SCIENCE DAILY · 3 days
The development of new hunting projectiles by European hunter-gatherers during the Mesolithic may have been linked to territoriality in a rapidly-changing climate, according to... more
Neanderthals Used Pine Resin as Glue to Haft Stone Tools into Handles  SCI-NEWS.COM · 3 weeks
The hafting of stone tools was an important advance in the technological evolution of Paleolithic humans. Joining a handle to a knife or scraper... more
Capuchin monkeys’ stone-tool use has evolved over 3,000 years  SCIENCE-NEWS · 4 weeks
A Brazilian archaeological site reveals capuchins’ long history of practical alterations to pounding implements, researchers say. more
Stone tool changes may show how Mesolithic hunter-gatherers responded to changing climate  PHYS.ORG · 3 days
The development of new hunting projectiles by European hunter-gatherers during the Mesolithic may have been linked to territoriality in a rapidly-changing climate, according to... more
Hand Dryers Harm Children's Hearing, Canadian Study Shows  NPR · 2 weeks
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Video games have been blamed for emotional damage and numerous behavioural problems in children and teenagers. A new study turned it all around by using video games for an emotional intelligence training program and... more
Back to the Stone Age: 17 Key Milestones in Paleolithic Life  LIVE SCIENCE · 4 weeks
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Neanderthals used resin 'glue' to craft their stone tools  SCIENCE DAILY · 3 weeks
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Neanderthals used resin 'glue' to craft their stone tools  PHYS.ORG · 3 weeks
Archaeologists working in two Italian caves have discovered some of the earliest known examples of ancient humans using an adhesive on their stone tools—an important technological advance called "hafting." more
Mood neurons mature during adolescence  SCIENCE DAILY · 4 weeks
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Study examines type of social interaction required for people to display physiological synchrony  NEWS MEDICAL · 1 month
A team of researchers led by a member of the Colorado School of Public Health faculty at the Anschutz Medical Campus examined... more
Can social interaction predict cognitive decline?  MNT · 3 weeks
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Medical News Today: Can social interaction predict cognitive decline?  MNT · 3 weeks
A number of studies have assessed the relationship between social interaction and dementia; the latest adds to the increasingly complex picture. more
13-Year-Old Scientist's Research Shows Hand Dryers Can Hurt Kids' Ears  NPR · 2 weeks
Research finds many hand dryers operate at noise levels that are harmful to children. Nora Keegan is the 13-year-old student who did the study in the Canadian journal... more
Scientists develop new 3D-printed prosthetic hand that can learn wearers’ basic motions  NEWS MEDICAL · 3 weeks
A new 3D-printed prosthetic hand can learn the wearers’ movement patterns to help amputee patients perform daily tasks, reports a study published this week... more
Women's stronger immune response to flu vaccination diminishes with age  SCIENCE DAILY · 4 days
Women tend to have a greater immune response to a flu vaccination compared to men, but their advantage largely disappears as they age and their estrogen levels decline,... more
Model development is crucial in understanding climate change  PHYS.ORG · 5 days
Numerical models are a key tool for climate scientists in understanding the past, present and future climate change arising from natural, unforced variability or in response to changes, according to Dr. Qing... more
Women's greater immune response to flu vaccine declines with age  NEWS MEDICAL · 3 days
Women tend to have a greater immune response to a flu vaccination compared to men, but their advantage largely disappears as they age and their estrogen levels decline,... more
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Jia-Bin Huang, assistant professor in the Bradley Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering and a faculty member at the Discovery Analytics Center, has received a Google Faculty Research Award to... more
Electronic cigarettes produce stress response in neural stem cells, study finds  NEWS MEDICAL · 3 weeks
A research team at the University of California, Riverside, has found that electronic cigarettes, often targeted to youth and pregnant women, produce a stress response in... more
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The researchers believe their study may enable quantitative understanding and evaluation of hydrogen-induced damage in hydrogen-rich environments such as fusion reactor cores. more
Study: Minimum wage 'an effective tool' for increasing incomes of older workers  PHYS.ORG · 1 week
A new paper co-written by a University of Illinois expert who studies labor economics says the minimum wage is an effective tool to increase... more
3D printed prosthetic hand can guess how you play rock, paper, scissors  nanowerk · 3 weeks
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Professor Sara Linse highlights Fluidity One-W as key technique for protein interaction analysis at FEBS 2019  NEWS MEDICAL · 2 weeks
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Researchers measure EEG-based brain responses for non-speech and speech sounds in children  NEWS MEDICAL · 3 days
Some of the findings in cognitive neuroscience and psychology do not seem to replicate from one study to the next. Could this also be... more
Goats can distinguish emotions from the calls of other goats  PHYS.ORG · 2 weeks
Goats can probably distinguish subtle emotional changes in the calls of other goats, according to a new study led by Queen Mary University of London. more
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