SCIENCE DAILY Germanium was the material of choice in the early history of electronic devices, and due to its high charge carrier mobility, it's making a comeback. It's generally grown on expensive single-crystal substrates, adding another challenge to making it sustainably viable for most applications. To address this aspect, researchers demonstrate an epitaxy method that incorporates van der Waals' forces to grow germanium on mica. 4 weeks
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Addition of tin boosts nanoparticle's photoluminescence
PHYS.ORG Researchers at the U.S. Department of Energy's Ames Laboratory have developed germanium nanoparticles with improved photoluminescence, making them potentially better materials for solar cells and imaging probes. The research team found that by adding tin to... 2 weeks
WATCH: Experts warn that this flu season could be a bad one
ABC NEWS Dr. Jennifer Ashton discusses a warning from medical experts that this season's flu vaccine may be ineffective against a strain of the virus that... 2 weeks
Thin films of a lead-free piezoelectric finally match the performance of the lead-bearing standard
PHYS.ORG An advance in fabrication technology has greatly improved the material quality and performance of thin films of a lead-free 'piezoelectric'... 2 weeks
Bat cave study sheds new light on origin of SARS virus
SCIENCE DAILY Genetic recombination between viral strains in bats may have produced the direct evolutionary ancestor of the strain that caused a deadly outbreak of severe acute respiratory... 2 weeks
Indonesian city to citizens: stop using free WiFi for drugs, prostitution
PHYS.ORG An Indonesian city thought it was doing half a million citizens a good turn by making wireless internet free in government offices. 2 weeks
Nature's toughest substances decoded
PHYS.ORG How a material breaks may be the most important property to consider when designing layered composites that mimic those found in nature. A method by Rice University engineers decodes the interactions between materials and the structures they form and can... 1 week
Record low contact resistivity on Ga-doped Ge source/drain contacts for pMOS transistors
PHYS.ORG At this week's 2017 International Electron Devices Meeting (IEDM), imec, the world-leading research and innovation hub in nanoelectronics and digital technology, reports ultralow contact... 1 week
Expanding DNA's alphabet lets cells produce novel proteins
PHYS.ORG Scientists are expanding the genetic code of life, using man-made DNA to create a semi-synthetic strain of bacteria—and new research shows those altered microbes actually worked to produce proteins unlike those found... 2 weeks
'Stressed out' cocoa trees could produce more flavorful chocolate
SCIENCE DAILY Most people agree that chocolate tastes great, but is there a way to make it taste even better? Perhaps, according to scientists who looked at different conditions that can put... 5 days
'Stressed out' cocoa trees could produce more flavorful chocolate
PHYS.ORG Most people agree that chocolate tastes great, but is there a way to make it taste even better? Perhaps, according to scientists who looked at different conditions that can put... 7 days
Female Parkinson's disease patients less likely to receive caregiver support than men
NEWS MEDICAL Female Parkinson's disease patients are much less likely than male patients to have caregivers, despite the fact that caregivers report greater strain in caring for male... 1 week
Galileo's free-falling objects experiment passes space test further proving equivalence principle
PHYS.ORG A team of researchers from the French Aerospace Lab and at the Côte d'Azur Observatory working on France's MICROSCOPE satellite project has further confirmed the equivalence... 1 week
New tool could help maintain quality during cheese production
PHYS.ORG Dutch type cheeses, notably edam and gouda, are made using complex starter cultures, that have been employed for centuries. Due to changes in strain composition within a culture, the quality... 5 days
Lower lung cancer rates in communities with strong smoke-free laws, study shows
SCIENCE DAILY Researchers studied the correlation between communities with strong smoke-free workplace laws and the number of new lung cancer diagnoses. Those communities have 8% fewer... 2 weeks
Quentin Tarantino Developing 'Star Trek' Film (With Help from J.J. Abrams): Report
SPACE.COM Quentin Tarantino is in talks with "Star Trek" producer (and former director) J.J. Abrams to write and direct a new Star Trek film, according... 7 days
First line combination therapy improves progression-free survival in advanced lung cancer
SCIENCE DAILY A new combination therapy for the first line treatment of advanced non-squamous non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) improves progression-free survival (PFS), according to results of a phase... 5 days
Soon you can watch the NFL free on your phone on Yahoo
PHYS.ORG Watching NFL football games on your phone used to be mainly limited to Verizon customers. Soon anyone will be able to watch football games... 2 days
Study: Fewer new cases of lung cancer found in communities with strong smoke-free laws
NEWS MEDICAL A recent study by University of Kentucky BREATHE researchers shows that fewer new cases of lung cancer were found in... 2 weeks
Ultrastretchable and deformable bioprobes using Kirigami designs
PHYS.ORG A research team in the Department of Electrical and Electronic Information Engineering and the Electronics-Inspired Interdisciplinary Research Institute (EIIRIS) at Toyohashi University of Technology has developed an ultrastretchable bioprobe using Kirigami designs. The Kirigami-based... 2 days
[Editors' Choice] Breaking free from the NETs
Science Magazine Neutrophil extracellular traps exacerbate ischemia reperfusion injury associated with neonatal midgut volvulus and serve as a therapeutic target. 7 days
UN assembly starts drafting plan for 'pollution-free planet'
PHYS.ORG Humans are poisoning their environment and themselves at an alarming rate, with pollution of the oceans, soil and air now the biggest killer, a UN conference heard Monday. 1 week
Minimally invasive treatment provides relief from back pain
SCIENCE DAILY The majority of patients were pain free after receiving a new image-guided pulsed radiofrequency treatment for low back pain and sciatica, according to a new study. 2 weeks
Gene regulation: Risk-free gene reactivation
SCIENCE DAILY Chemical modification of DNA subunits contribute to the regulation of gene expression. Researchers have now deciphered a new pathway can reactivate genes that have been silenced in this way, while avoiding the risk of damaging the DNA. 2 weeks
Risk-free gene reactivation
PHYS.ORG Chemical modification of DNA subunits contribute to the regulation of gene expression. Researchers from Ludwig-Maximilians-Universitaet (LMU) in Munich have now deciphered a new pathway can reactivate genes that have been silenced in this way, while avoiding the risk of damaging... 2 weeks
Medical News Today: How to reduce Christmas stress
MNT Christmas is supposed to be the season of peace and goodwill, but it's often a source of stress, instead. Here are some tips for a stress-free Christmas. 6 days
How to reduce Christmas stress
MNT Christmas is supposed to be the season of peace and goodwill, but it's often a source of stress, instead. Here are some tips for a stress-free Christmas. 6 days
World's nations adopt plan 'towards a pollution-free planet'
PHYS.ORG The world's nations vowed Wednesday to curb plastic and chemical contamination of the air, soil, rivers and oceans, calling for a steep change in how goods are produced and consumed. 7 days
'Hallucination Machine' Takes You on a Drug-Free Psychedelic Trip
LIVE SCIENCE Virtual-reality devices can transport users to magical realms from the comfort of their own homes, but a new device built by British engineers takes users on a different kind of... 2 weeks
Visible signals from brain and heart
SCIENCE DAILY Key processes in the body are controlled by the concentration of calcium in and around cells. Scientists have now developed the first sensor molecule that is able to visualize calcium in living animals with the help... 2 weeks
Less invasive therapy relieves low back pain, study states
NEWS MEDICAL According to a study presented at the annual meeting of the Radiological Society of North America, most patients who had undergone image-guided pulsed radiofrequency treatment for sciatica and low back... 1 week
In The U.S., Flu Season Could Be Unusually Harsh This Year
NPR
Reducing discrimination in AI with new methodology
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Video: Surviving the onslaught of invasive species
PHYS.ORG
How freezing a soap bubble turns it into a ‘snow globe’
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Lava Gulps Down GoPro Camera, Which Records the Entire, Fiery Affair
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Mercury toxicity in the Peruvian Amazon
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