The largest fish to walk on land, the voracious northern snakehead, will flee water that is too acidic, salty or high in carbon dioxide—important information for future management of this invasive species.... PHYS.ORG · 3 weeks
Poor water conditions drive invasive snakeheads onto land  SCIENCE DAILY · 3 weeks
Researchers report on the water conditions that could drive snakeheads onto land. more
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NASA is sending a mobile robot to the South Pole of the moon to get a close-up view of the location and concentration of water ice... more
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Superbly preserved fossils from Russia cast new and surprising light on one of the earliest tetrapods -- the group of animals that made the evolutionary transition from water to land... more
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The earliest well-preserved tetrapod may never have left the water  PHYS.ORG · 3 weeks
Superbly preserved fossils from Russia, excavated by an international team and reported in the journal Nature, casts new and surprising light on one of the earliest tetrapods—the group... more
Cell stiffness may indicate whether tumors will invade  PHYS.ORG · 3 weeks
Engineers at MIT and elsewhere have tracked the evolution of individual cells within an initially benign tumor, showing how the physical properties of those cells drive the tumor to become invasive, or... more
What we can learn from Indigenous land management  SCIENCE DAILY · 7 days
First Nations peoples' world view and connection to Country provide a rich source of knowledge and innovations for better land and water management policies when Indigenous decision-making is enacted, Australian researchers say.... more
Student maps Niagara's invasive species  PHYS.ORG · 2 weeks
They hitch rides on the soles of people's shoes and in water carried and dumped by ships, enabling them to sneak through borders undetected. more
Mapping millet genetics  PHYS.ORG · 3 weeks
In the semi-arid tropics of Asia and Africa, conditions can be difficult for crops. Plants need to have short growing seasons, survive on poor soils and tolerate environmental stresses. more
Mapping millet genetics  SCIENCE DAILY · 3 weeks
In the semi-arid tropics of Asia and Africa, conditions can be difficult for crops. Plants need to have short growing seasons, survive on poor soils and tolerate environmental stresses. Enter, the millets. more
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A new integrated modeling framework could help the Indus Basin region find solutions to water resource challenges and interconnected sustainable development goals. The new framework, described in a perspective article published today in the journal One... more
Searching for water  PHYS.ORG · 4 weeks
In a place like Delaware, where it rains frequently, water is a renewable resource. Natural processes will replenish the water that is being used or consumed. In an area where rain is not as plentiful, such as the Arabian Peninsula,... more
Further evidence bedtime social media use is harming teenagers  NEWS MEDICAL · 3 weeks
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A roadmap to make the land sector carbon neutral by 2040  SCIENCE DAILY · 3 weeks
Land is critical to human livelihoods and wellbeing, while actions related to land use also play an important role in the climate system. Researchers have developed... more
Young workers with health conditions linked to poor work productivity  PHYS.ORG · 22 hours
Young adults who are living with more than one health condition experienced poorer productivity in the workplace, according to a new study involving Curtin University researchers. more
Socially housed and isolated mice may be poor research models for humans  NEWS MEDICAL · 3 weeks
Animal models can serve as gateways for understanding many human communication disorders. Insights into the genetic paths possibly responsible for conditions such as autism... more
E. coli infections linked to poor hygiene, not contaminated food  MNT · 3 weeks
Researchers warn that people who become infected with drug-resistant Escherichia coli most likely do so due to poor hygiene practices, not mishandled food. more
Medical News Today: E. coli infections linked to poor hygiene, not contaminated food  MNT · 3 weeks
Researchers warn that people who become infected with drug-resistant Escherichia coli most likely do so due to poor hygiene practices, not mishandled... more
Countries pledge $9.8B for global climate fund to help poor  PHYS.ORG · 3 weeks
Rich countries have pledged $9.8 billion to help poor nations tackle climate change, the fund coordinating support said Friday, as environmental campaigners slammed the United States for refusing... more
Newly identified compounds could help give fire ants their sting  SCIENCE DAILY · 4 weeks
Native to South America, imported fire ants have now spread to parts of North America and elsewhere around the world. These invasive pests have painful stings that, in... more
National-scale study shows that invasive grasses promote wildfire  PHYS.ORG · 1 week
In a first national-scale analysis, ecologists at the University of Massachusetts Amherst, with colleagues at the University of Colorado-Boulder, report that across the United States, invasive grasses can double the number of... more
Nations pledge $9.8B to global climate fund to help the poor  PHYS.ORG · 3 weeks
Rich countries have pledged $9.8 billion to help poor nations tackle climate change, the Green Climate Fund said Friday, as environmental activists slammed the United States... more
Examining age, sustainability of fossil aquifers in Arabian Peninsula  SCIENCE DAILY · 4 weeks
What does the presence of 1,000 year old water mean for the future of water supplies under the desert regions of Saudi Arabia, Iraq, Jordan, Oman, Yemen and the United... more
Injectable, flexible electrode could replace rigid nerve-stimulating implants  SCIENCE DAILY · 11 hours
By electrically stimulating nerves, neuromodulation therapies can reduce epileptic seizures, soothe chronic pain, and treat depression and a host of other health conditions without the use of conventional drugs like opioids. Now,... more
Water nanostructure formation on oxide probed in situ by optical resonances  Science Magazine · 3 weeks
The dynamic characterization of water multilayers on oxide surfaces is hard to achieve by currently available techniques. Despite this, there is an increasing interest in the... more
Vitamin D deficiency linked to poor muscle strength in older adults  NEWS MEDICAL · 3 weeks
New research from Trinity College Dublin shows that vitamin D deficiency is an important determinant of poor skeletal muscle function in adults aged 60 years and... more
Research networks can help BRICS countries combat invasive species  PHYS.ORG · 4 weeks
BRICS countries (Brazil, Russia, India, China and South Africa) should establish more networks of researchers dedicated to invasion science if they wish to curb the spread of invasive species within... more
Newly identified compounds could help give fire ants their sting  PHYS.ORG · 4 weeks
Native to South America, imported fire ants have now spread to parts of North America and elsewhere around the world. These invasive pests have painful stings that, in... more
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