During the past 20 years, insecticides applied to U.S. agricultural landscapes have become significantly more toxic—over 120-fold in some midwestern states—to honey bees when ingested, according to a team of researchers, who identified rising neonicotinoid seed treatments in corn and soy as the primary driver of this change. The study is the first to characterize the geographic patterns of insecticide toxicity to bees and reveal specific areas of the country where mitigation and conservation eff... PHYS.ORG · 1 month
Africa should ban neonicotinoid insecticides, too  PHYS.ORG · 3 weeks
First marketed in the late 1990s, neonicotinoid insecticides have become the world's most widely used group of insecticides. They offer lower toxicity to mammals than the insecticides they replaced. But their systemic nature means that all... more
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Bees are pollinators of many plants, but their diversity and density is declining. A team investigated their foraging behavior in agricultural landscapes. They found that honey bees prefer strawberry fields,... more
Dance of the honey bee reveals fondness for strawberries  PHYS.ORG · 4 weeks
Bees are pollinators of many wild and crop plants, but in many places their diversity and density is declining. A research team from the Universities of Göttingen, Sussex and Würzburg... more
Tiny Dancer: Scientists spy on booty-shaking bees to help conservation  PHYS.ORG · 2 weeks
We've long known honey bees shake their behinds to communicate the location of high-value flower patches to one another, a form of signaling that scientists refer to as... more
Engineered symbionts activate honey bee immunity and limit pathogens  Science Magazine · 3 weeks
Honey bees are essential pollinators threatened by colony losses linked to the spread of parasites and pathogens. Here, we report a new approach for manipulating bee gene expression and protecting... more
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Scientists from The University of Texas at Austin report in the journal Science that they have developed a new strategy to protect honey bees from a deadly trend known as... more
Bumble bees prefer a low-fat diet  PHYS.ORG · 3 weeks
Bees are an important factor for our environment and our sustenance. Without insect pollination, many plant species—including various crops—cannot reproduce. "Bee mortality therefore affects food supply for human beings," said Professor Sara Leonhardt, who specializes in... more
Why bumble bees are going extinct in time of 'climate chaos'  PHYS.ORG · 2 weeks
When you were young, were you the type of child who would scour open fields looking for bumble bees? Today, it is much harder for kids... more
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Are bees dying of malnourishment? Researchers examine the interactions between plants and insects. Using behavioral experiments, the team analyzes how bumble bees evaluate the quality of food sources and how foods of various qualities affect their... more
New study identifies bumble bees' favorite flowers to aid bee conservation  PHYS.ORG · 4 weeks
Many species of North American bumble bees have seen significant declines in recent decades. Bumble bees are essential pollinators for both native and agricultural plants, and... more
Asian hornet invasion spreads to Northern Germany  SCIENCE DAILY · 3 weeks
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Smart single mother bees learn from their neighbors  PHYS.ORG · 4 weeks
Solitary female bees inspect other nests for signs of danger before making decisions on where to build their own, a new London-based study suggests. more
Prescribed burns benefit bees  SCIENCE DAILY · 3 weeks
Freshly burned longleaf pine forests have more than double the total number of bees and bee species than similar forests that have not burned in over 50 years, according to new research. more
Prescribed burns benefit bees  PHYS.ORG · 4 weeks
Freshly burned longleaf pine forests have more than double the total number of bees and bee species than similar forests that have not burned in over 50 years, according to new research from North Carolina State University. more
Study identifies previously unknown toxic by-products potentially present in drinking water  NEWS MEDICAL · 4 weeks
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Why bumble bees are going extinct in time of 'climate chaos'  SCIENCE DAILY · 2 weeks
Researchers have created a new technique that shows which species will be at risk from climate change, where those risks are most severe, and even suggests... more
Bees prioritize their unique waggle dance to find flowers  PHYS.ORG · 2 weeks
Researchers at Royal Holloway have developed a method to track bee-to-bee communication in honeybee hives, showing how bees have many means to learn from their nest mates about the best... more
A blanket ban on toxic 'forever chemicals' is good for people and animals  PHYS.ORG · 2 weeks
Lowe's recently joined the Home Depot and other major retail chains in phasing out the sale of products treated with poly- and... more
New toxic byproducts of disinfecting drinking water  SCIENCE DAILY · 4 weeks
Mixing drinking water with chlorine, the United States' most common method of disinfecting drinking water, creates previously unidentified toxic byproducts. more
What's in your water? Researchers identify new toxic byproducts of disinfecting drinking water  PHYS.ORG · 4 weeks
Mixing drinking water with chlorine, the United States' most common method of disinfecting drinking water, creates previously unidentified toxic byproducts, says Carsten... more
Cyanobacteria problems will worsen if carbon concentrations continue to rise  PHYS.ORG · 3 days
Scientists from the University of Amsterdam are warning that problems with toxic cyanobacteria are likely to increase in the future. In an article in the journal Science Advances,... more
Bumble bees display cross-modal object recognition between visual and tactile senses  Science Magazine · 3 days
Many animals can associate object shapes with incentives. However, such behavior is possible without storing images of shapes in memory that are accessible to more than... more
Traditional Chinese medicinal plant yields new insecticide compounds  SCIENCE DAILY · 3 weeks
For hundreds of years, practitioners of traditional Chinese medicine have used an herb called Stemona sessilifolia as a remedy for parasitic infections, such as those caused by pinworms and lice. Now, researchers... more
For Kid's Coughs, Swap The Over-The-Counter Syrups For Honey  NPR · 2 weeks
For parents desperate to calm a kid's hacking cough, so the whole family can get some sleep, turns out there's evidence that a common kitchen ingredient works better than OTC... more
Traditional Chinese medicinal plant yields new insecticide compounds  PHYS.ORG · 4 weeks
For hundreds of years, practitioners of traditional Chinese medicine have used an herb called Stemona sessilifolia as a remedy for parasitic infections, such as those caused by pinworms and lice. Now, researchers... more
Bumble bees can experience an object using one sense and later recognize it using another  SCIENCE DAILY · 2 days
The ability to recognize objects across different senses is present in the tiny brains of an insect, researchers... more
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