History
Everest: I journeyed into the 'death zone' to install the world's highest weather station  PHYS.ORG · 14 minutes
Perched at almost 8,500 metres on Everest, we paced back-and-forth, attempting to stave off frostbite as temperatures hovered close to -30°C and... more
Blue color tones in fossilized prehistoric feathers  PHYS.ORG · 15 hours
Examining fossilised pigments, scientists from the University of Bristol have uncovered new insights into blue colour tones in prehistoric birds. more
Giant Squid Filmed Alive for Second Time in History. Here's the Video.  LIVE SCIENCE · 22 hours
For only the second time in history, researchers have recorded footage of a live — and very curious — giant squid in the pitch-dark... more
Genome study reveals history of European potato  PHYS.ORG · 24 hours
A team of researchers from Germany, Peru, the U.K. and Spain has sequenced a large number of potato varieties to learn more about the history of the modern European potato. In their paper published... more
Santorini volcano, a new terrestrial analogue of Mars  PHYS.ORG · 24 hours
The Greek island of Santorini is now one of the most popular tourist destinations in the Mediterranean, but 3,600 years ago it suffered one of the largest volcanic eruptions in recorded history.... more
The ancient croc that preyed on dinosaurs  PHYS.ORG · 1 day
A new species of crocodile has been described from opalised fossils found at Lightning Ridge in NSW, Australia, from a fossil unearthed more than a century ago, and a second one found more than... more
Ancient intervention could boost dwindling water reserves in coastal Peru  SCIENCE DAILY · 1 day
Methods used 1,400 years ago could boost water availability during Lima's dry season, according to new research. more
Attempted Whale Shark Mating Caught on Camera for the First Time in History  LIVE SCIENCE · 2 days
Nobody knows how whale sharks have sex, but these world-first aerial photos provide some big clues. more
Ancient intervention could boost dwindling water reserves in coastal Peru  PHYS.ORG · 2 days
Nestled between the Pacific Ocean and the Andes mountains, Peru's coastal region relies on surface water from the Andes for drinking water, industry, and animal and crop farming. more
Capuchin monkeys’ stone-tool use has evolved over 3,000 years  SCIENCE-NEWS · 2 days
A Brazilian archaeological site reveals capuchins’ long history of practical alterations to pounding implements, researchers say. more
Subaru Telescope identifies the outermost edge of the Milky Way system  PHYS.ORG · 2 days
A team of researchers identified the outermost edge of the Milky Way galaxy. Using the Subaru Telescope, the researchers examined the boundary of the stellar system... more
SpaceX Eyes New Feats With Falcon Heavy Launch Tonight  SPACE.COM · 2 days
SpaceX's megarocket, the Falcon Heavy, is poised for flight. Perched atop NASA's historic Pad 39A, the behemoth will lift off sometime during a 4-hour window that opens late tonight (June... more
CNN Documentary 'Apollo 11' Premieres on TV Tonight  SPACE.COM · 3 days
The smash hit film "Apollo 11," made entirely of archival NASA footage, pays a thrilling homage to the historic mission. Tonight, CNN premieres the film on television for all to enjoy. more
Take One Giant Leap to the Moon with New Augmented Reality Apps  SPACE.COM · 3 days
If you weren't born when the first crewed moon-landing mission launched — or you want to relive the experience — USA Today's two augmented... more
Experts raise alarm over climate change threat to cultural heritage  PHYS.ORG · 4 days
Climate change could wreak "irreversible damage" on the world's most precious ancient monuments and other cultural sites, experts warned Saturday as they pushed for UN protection for major... more
Researchers unlock mystery of immunosuppressive drug's biosynthesis  NEWS MEDICAL · 4 days
Mycophenolic acid (MPA), discovered in 1893, was the first natural antibiotic to be isolated and crystallized in human history. more
Alzheimer's family history risk may show as memory deficit even for those in their 20s  SCIENCE DAILY · 5 days
Results from a study of nearly 60,000 individuals suggest those at higher risk of developing Alzheimer's disease due... more
Visualization of vermilion degradation using pump-probe microscopy  Science Magazine · 5 days
Here, we demonstrate the use of pump-probe microscopy for high-resolution studies of vermilion degradation. Vermilion (mostly α-HgS), an important red pigment used in historical paintings, blackens over time, and metallic Hg and β-HgS have... more
Ice lithography: opportunities and challenges in 3D nanofabrication  nanowerk · 5 days
The history and progress of ice lithography (IL), and its applications in 3D nanofabrication are reviewed. more
Mystery of immunosuppressive drug's biosynthesis finally unlocked  PHYS.ORG · 5 days
Mycophenolic acid (MPA), discovered in 1893, was the first natural antibiotic to be isolated and crystallized in human history. Today, this fungal metabolite has been developed into multiple first-line immunosuppressive drugs to control immunologic... more
Acropolis Museum marks 10-year anniversary with new extension  PHYS.ORG · 5 days
Greece's Acropolis Museum has opened to the public a new section housing the remains of an ancient Athens neighbourhood to mark its 10-year-anniversary, organisers said Friday. more
Stresses from past earthquakes explain location of seismic events  PHYS.ORG · 5 days
The cumulative stresses caused by historic earthquakes could provide some explanation as to why and where they occur, according to new research. more
People with family history of Alzheimer's do not perform as well as their peers  NEWS MEDICAL · 5 days
Results from a study of nearly 60,000 individuals suggest those at higher risk of developing Alzheimer's disease due to family... more
Earth's oldest animals could take trips  SCIENCE DAILY · 6 days
New research settles a longstanding debate about whether the most ancient animal communities were deliberately mobile. It turns out they were, because they were hungry. more
Narwhals and belugas can interbreed  SCIENCE DAILY · 6 days
A team of researchers has compiled the first and only evidence that narwhals and beluga whales can breed successfully. DNA and stable isotope analysis of an anomalous skull from the Natural History Museum of Denmark has allowed researchers... more
Archaeological mystery solved with modern genetics  SCIENCE DAILY · 6 days
Researchers have conducted a census of the Japanese population around 2,500 years ago using the Y chromosomes of men living on the main islands of modern-day Japan. This is the first time analysis of modern genomes... more
Retracing ancient routes to Australia  SCIENCE DAILY · 6 days
New insights into how people first arrived in Australia have determined the likely routes travelled by Aboriginal people tens of thousands of years ago along with the sizes of groups required for the population to survive in harsh... more
Researchers confirm that narwhals and belugas can interbreed  PHYS.ORG · 6 days
A team of University of Copenhagen researchers has compiled the first and only evidence that narwhals and beluga whales can breed successfully. DNA and stable isotope analysis of an anomalous skull from... more
Is burning trash a good way to handle it? Waste incineration in 5 charts  PHYS.ORG · 6 days
Burning trash has a long history in the United States, and municipal solid waste incinerators have sparked resistance in many... more
Y chromosomes reveal population boom and bust in ancient Japan  PHYS.ORG · 6 days
Researchers at the University of Tokyo conducted a census of the Japanese population around 2,500 years ago using the Y chromosomes of men living on the main islands... more
Presidential Historian Douglas Brinkley Talks JFK, Moonshots and Apollo 11  SPACE.COM · 6 days
Presidential historian Douglas Brinkley addressed a crowd seated beneath the space shuttle Enterprise at the Intrepid Sea, Air & Space Museum to discuss his latest book, "American Moonshot." more
New study proves some of Earth's oldest animals could take trips  PHYS.ORG · 6 days
New UC Riverside-led research settles a longstanding debate about whether the most ancient animal communities were deliberately mobile. It turns out they were, because they were... more
The Wright Brothers and the First Airplane Flight  SPACE.COM · 7 days
The Wright Brothers’ first plane flight in Kitty Hawk lasted just 12 seconds in 1903, but Orville and Wilbur made history with their Wright Flyer. more
Defaunation precipitates the extinction of evolutionarily distinct interactions in the Anthropocene  Science Magazine · 7 days
Species on Earth are interconnected with each other through ecological interactions. Defaunation can erode those connections, yet we lack evolutionary predictions about the consequences of losing... more
Human migration in Oceania recreated through paper mulberry genetics  PHYS.ORG · 7 days
The migration and interaction routes of prehistoric humans throughout the islands of Oceania can be retraced using genetic differences between paper mulberry plants, a tree native to Asia cultivated for... more
Plate tectonics may have driven 'Cambrian Explosion'  SCIENCE DAILY · 7 days
The quest to discover what drove one of the most important evolutionary events in the history of life on Earth has taken a new, fascinating twist. more
Plate tectonics may have driven Cambrian Explosion, study shows  PHYS.ORG · 7 days
The quest to discover what drove one of the most important evolutionary events in the history of life on Earth has taken a new, fascinating twist. more
Using culture to breathe new life into historic city centres  PHYS.ORG · 7 days
Urban decay, social conflict and low living standards are not uncommon in many of Europe's historic city centres. Is it possible to breathe new life into these areas... more
Troublesome trees: spread of forests contributed to ancient extinction  PHYS.ORG · 1 week
Evidence from ancient rocks in north Alabama show the Earth's first forest spread rapidly, likely contributing to a mass extinction of shallow marine life some 370 million years ago. more
Largest data set in SETI history released to the public  PHYS.ORG · 1 week
Breakthrough Listen—the astronomical program searching for signs of intelligent life in the Universe—has submitted two publications to leading astrophysics journals, describing the analysis of its first three years... more
Crocs' climate clock: Ancient distribution of Crocs could reveal more about past climates  SCIENCE DAILY · 1 week
Underneath their tough exteriors, some crocodilians have a sensitive side that scientists could use to shine light on our ancient climate. more
Secret of the Sun's Early Spin May Be Buried in Moon Rock  SPACE.COM · 1 week
NASA may discover the secrets of the sun's early history in an unlikely location: Earth's moon. more
Crocs' climate clock: Ancient distribution of Crocs could reveal more about past climates  PHYS.ORG · 1 week
Underneath their tough exteriors, some crocodilians have a sensitive side that scientists could use to shine light on our ancient climate, according... more
New manufacturing process for aluminum alloys  SCIENCE DAILY · 1 week
Using a novel Solid Phase Processing approach, a research team eliminated several steps that are required during conventional extrusion processing of aluminum alloy powders, while also achieving a significant increase in product ductility. This is good... more
New study shows how environmental disruptions affected ancient societies  SCIENCE DAILY · 1 week
A new study shows that over the past 10,000 years, humanity has experienced a number of foundational transitions, or 'bottlenecks.' During these periods of transition, the advance or decline of... more
New insight from Great Barrier Reef coral provides correction factor to climate records  SCIENCE DAILY · 1 week
Newly developed geological techniques help uncover the most accurate and high-resolution climate records to date, according to a new study. The research... more
Fossil teeth reveal ancient hyenas in the Arctic  SCIENCE DAILY · 1 week
Modern hyenas are known as hunters and scavengers in Asian and African ecosystems such as the savanna. But in ancient times, these powerful carnivores also roamed a very different landscape, inhabiting the... more
Scientists studying how large-scale environmental disruptions affected ancient societies  PHYS.ORG · 1 week
John Day, Distinguished Professor Emeritus in LSU's College of the Coast & Environment, has collaborated on a new analysis of societal development with Joel Gunn of the University of North... more
New insight from Great Barrier Reef coral provides correction factor to climate records  PHYS.ORG · 1 week
Newly developed geological techniques help uncover the most accurate and high-resolution climate records to date, according to a new study. The research... more
Dark centers of chromosomes reveal ancient DNA  PHYS.ORG · 1 week
Geneticists exploring the dark heart of the human genome have discovered big chunks of Neanderthal and other ancient DNA. The results open new ways to study both how chromosomes behave during cell division and... more
Dinosaur bones are home to microscopic life  PHYS.ORG · 1 week
Bad news, Jurassic Park fans—the odds of scientists cloning a dinosaur from ancient DNA are pretty much zero. That's because DNA breaks down over time and isn't stable enough to stay intact for millions... more
Sleep history predicts late-life Alzheimer's pathology  SCIENCE DAILY · 1 week
Sleep patterns can predict the accumulation of Alzheimer's pathology proteins later in life, according to a new study. These findings could lead to new sleep-based early diagnosis and prevention measures in the treatment of Alzheimer's disease. more
Decoding Lake Matoaka's sedimental history of the anthropocene  PHYS.ORG · 1 week
The region around the Mississippi River town of Galena, Illinois, ran on lead for the better part of a century. more
Fossil teeth reveal ancient hyenas in the Arctic  PHYS.ORG · 1 week
Modern hyenas are known as hunters and scavengers in Asian and African ecosystems such as the savanna. more
Indian family branches out with novel tree house  PHYS.ORG · 1 week
When the Kesharwanis decided to branch out and expand their family home, they came up with a novel way of dealing with an ancient giant fig tree in their garden—they built the... more
Four decades of gluons  CERN · 1 week
Four decades of gluons Ana Lopes abelchio Tue, 06/18/2019 - 09:26 A three-jet event detected by the TASSO detector. (Image: CERN) Forty years ago, in 1979, experiments at... more
9,000 years ago, a community with modern urban problems  SCIENCE DAILY · 1 week
Bioarchaeologists report new findings from the ancient ruins of Çatalhöyük, in modern Turkey. The results paint a picture of what it was like for humans to move from a nomadic... more
Prehistoric settlement in Turkey bears telltale signs of modern woes  REUTERS · 1 week
Overcrowding. Violence. Infectious diseases. Environmental degradation. It may sound like the worst of modern mega-cities. more
Medical News Today: What to expect during a physical exam  MNT · 1 week
Physical exams are routine checkups of a person’s general health. A healthcare professional will visually inspect, feel, or listen to different areas of a person’s body to look... more
Sun's history found buried in Moon's crust  SCIENCE DAILY · 1 week
The Sun's rotation rate in its first billion years is unknown. Yet, this spin rate affected solar eruptions, influencing the evolution of life. Scientists think they've figured it out by using the Moon as... more
Past climate change: A warning for the future?  SCIENCE DAILY · 1 week
A new study of climate changes and their effects on past societies offers a sobering glimpse of social upheavals that might happen in the future. The prehistoric groups studied lived in the... more
The First Flight: Wright Flyer  SPACE.COM · 1 week
The 1903 Wright Flyer that made history's first flight included propellers and wire controls. more
Scientists find sun's history buried in moon's crust  PHYS.ORG · 1 week
The Sun is why we're here. It's also why Martians or Venusians are not. more
'Apollo's Moon Shot' Series Shows History of Human Lunar Exploration  SPACE.COM · 1 week
A new Smithsonian Channel series celebrates the artifacts that led to Apollo 11's triumphant moon landing 50 years ago, and shares behind-the-scenes stories from the mission. more
Pass The Brazier: Early Evidence Of Cannabis Smoking Found On Chinese Artifacts  NPR · 2 weeks
Humans have been smoking pot to get high since the first millennium B.C. Archaeologists have found early evidence of cannabis use from wooden bowls... more
Cardiac toxicity risk factors identified with relapsed multiple myeloma therapy  SCIENCE DAILY · 2 weeks
More than half of patients with relapsed multiple myeloma treated with carfilzomib experienced cardiac issues during treatment, according to a multi-institutional study. The study recommends that patients undergo... more
No direct link between north Atlantic currents, sea level along New England coast  PHYS.ORG · 2 weeks
A new study by the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution (WHOI) clarifies what influence major currents in the North Atlantic have on sea... more
Giant Cambrian Trilobite Species Unearthed in Australia  SCI-NEWS.COM · 2 weeks
Paleontologists have unearthed fossils of a giant trilobite species that inhabited Australian waters approximately 500 million years ago (Cambrian period). Trilobites are... more
How Sweden went from 'least democratic' to welfare state  PHYS.ORG · 2 weeks
In a new study, Lund University economic historian Erik Bengtsson debunks the myth that Sweden was destined to become a social democratic country. Instead, he argues that it was actually... more
Did your primary school teacher lie to you about color?  PHYS.ORG · 2 weeks
At primary school you were taught that there are three primary colors: red, yellow and blue, and that you can mix these to make all other colors. This... more
When the world stopped to watch Armstrong's moonwalk  PHYS.ORG · 2 weeks
When Neil Armstrong walked on the Moon, he became the biggest live television star in history. more
Close-range remote sensing of Saturns rings during Cassinis ring-grazing orbits and Grand Finale  Science Magazine · 2 weeks
Saturn’s rings are an accessible exemplar of an astrophysical disk, tracing the Saturn system’s dynamical processes and history. We present close-range remote-sensing... more
Ancient 'Loch Ness Monster' from Antarctica Breaks a Record for Body Size  LIVE SCIENCE · 2 weeks
Paleontologists have discovered the remains of an ancient Loch Ness Monster look-alike in freezing Antarctica. And just like the legendary Nessie, it wasn't the... more
NASA's Mars 2020 will blaze a trail for humans  PHYS.ORG · 2 weeks
When a female astronaut first sets foot on the moon in 2024, the historic moment will represent a step toward another NASA first: eventually putting humans on Mars. NASA's latest... more
Zebras' stripes could be used to control their temperature, reveals new study  PHYS.ORG · 2 weeks
New research published in the Journal of Natural History indicates that zebras' stripes are used to control body temperature after all—and reveals for the... more
Diet at the docks: Living and dying at the port of ancient Rome  SCIENCE DAILY · 2 weeks
Researchers present the results of an analysis of plant, animal and human remains, reconstructing both the diets and geographic origins of the... more
Origins of cannabis smoking  SCIENCE DAILY · 2 weeks
A chemical residue study of incense burners from ancient burials at high elevations in western China has revealed psychoactive cannabinoids. The finding provides some of the earliest evidence for the use of cannabis for its psychoactive compounds. more
The Wikipedia gender gap  PHYS.ORG · 2 weeks
Wikipedia is one of the most successful online communities in history, yet it struggles to attract and retain editors who are women—another example of the gender gap online. In a recent University of Washington study, researchers interviewed women "Wikipedians" to... more
Rising sea levels destroyed evidence of shell middens at many prehistoric coastal sites  SCIENCE DAILY · 2 weeks
In a new study, researchers confirm a theory from the 1970s that coastal hunter-gatherers processed much of their shellfish at the beach... more
Uncovering the hidden history of a giant asteroid  SCIENCE DAILY · 2 weeks
A massive 'hit-and-run' collision profoundly impacted the evolutionary history of Vesta, the brightest asteroid visible from Earth. The finding deepens our understanding of protoplanet formation more than 4.5 billion years ago, in... more
Rising sea levels destroyed evidence of shell middens at many prehistoric coastal sites  PHYS.ORG · 2 weeks
Archaeological remains of coastal occupation in the form of shell middens are commonly found on today's shorelines, and evidence for shellfish as... more
The origins of cannabis smoking: Marijuana use in the first millennium BC  PHYS.ORG · 2 weeks
Cannabis has been cultivated for millennia in East Asia as an oil-seed and fibre crop. Little is known, however, about the early use and... more
Protecting coral reefs in a deteriorating environment  PHYS.ORG · 2 weeks
Coral reefs around the world face growing danger from a changing climate, on top of the historic threats from local pollution and habitat destruction. In response, scientists are researching new interventions that have the... more
Evolutionary discovery to rewrite textbooks  PHYS.ORG · 2 weeks
Scientists at The University of Queensland have upended biologists' century-old understanding of the evolutionary history of animals. more
An innovative electron microscope overturning common knowledge of 88 years history  SCIENCE DAILY · 2 weeks
In conventional electron microscopes, performing atomic-resolution observations of magnetic materials is particularly difficult because high magnetic fields are inevitably exerted on samples inside the magnetic objective... more
Baby pterodactyls could fly from birth  PHYS.ORG · 2 weeks
A breakthrough discovery reveals that pterodactyls, extinct flying reptiles, had a remarkable ability—they could fly from birth. The importance of this discovery is highlighted by the fact that no other living vertebrates today, or those in... more
Diet at the docks: Living and dying at the port of ancient Rome  PHYS.ORG · 2 weeks
Portus Romae was established in the middle of the first century AD and for well over 400 years was Rome's gateway to... more
CNN Documentary 'Apollo 11' Premieres on TV Tonight
SPACE.COM
The First Flight: Wright Flyer
SPACE.COM
New photography technique brings hidden history of fossils to light
PHYS.ORG
Oldest evidence of marijuana use discovered in 2500-year-old cemetery in peaks of western China
Science Magazine
Breakthrough in the discovery of DNA in ancient bones buried in water
SCIENCE DAILY
Bringing reality into the world of VR
PHYS.ORG
What Is Cryptography?
LIVE SCIENCE
Floating cities: The future or a washed-up idea?
PHYS.ORG
Fresh