History
Research sheds new light on the phage therapy history  NEWS MEDICAL · 2 days
In the current situation when the fear of virus infections in the public is common, it is good to remember that some viruses can be extremely beneficial for mankind, even... more
European Neanderthals mostly used aquatic resources 100,000 years ago  NEWS MEDICAL · 2 days
Ernestina Badal, professor at the Department of Prehistory, Archeology and Ancient History at the University of Valencia, has participated in research published today in the prestigious journal Science that confirms... more
Bricks can act as 'cameras' for characterizing past presence of radioactive materials  SCIENCE DAILY · 2 days
Researchers have developed a technique for determining the historical location and distribution of radioactive materials, such as weapons grade plutonium. The technique may allow... more
Forgotten tale of phage therapy history revealed  SCIENCE DAILY · 2 days
In the current situation when the fear of virus infections in the public is common, it is good to remember that some viruses can be extremely beneficial for humankind, even save lives. Such viruses,... more
New Feathered Dinosaur Unveiled: Dineobellator notohesperus  SCI-NEWS.COM · 2 days
A new species of dromaeosaurid dinosaur being named Dineobellator notohesperus has been discovered by a team of U.S. paleontologists. Dineobellator notohesperus lived some 67... more
Coral tells own tale about El Niño's past  SCIENCE DAILY · 3 days
Scientists use data from ancient coral to build a record of temperatures in the tropical Pacific Ocean over the last millennium. The data question previous links between volcanic eruptions and El Niño... more
Coral tells own tale about El Nino's past  PHYS.ORG · 3 days
There is no longer a need to guess what ocean temperatures were like in the remote tropical Pacific hundreds of years ago. The ancient coral that lived there know all. more
The historical roots of economic development  Science Magazine · 3 days
This article reviews an emerging area of research within economics that seeks to better understand contemporary economic outcomes by taking a historical perspective. The field has established that many of the contemporary differences in comparative economic... more
Bricks can act as 'cameras' for characterizing past presence of radioactive materials  PHYS.ORG · 3 days
Researchers from North Carolina State University have developed a new technique for determining the historical location and distribution of radioactive materials, such as weapons... more
Mathematical epidemiology: How to model a pandemic  PHYS.ORG · 3 days
Disease has afflicted humans ever since there have been human. Malaria and tuberculosis are thought to have ravaged Ancient Egypt more than 5,000 years ago. From AD 541 to 542 the global pandemic known... more
The effect of human mobility and control measures on the COVID-19 epidemic in China  Science Magazine · 4 days
The ongoing COVID-19 outbreak expanded rapidly throughout China. Major behavioral, clinical, and state interventions have been undertaken to mitigate the... more
Emergence of a Neolithic in highland New Guinea by 5000 to 4000 years ago  Science Magazine · 4 days
The emergence of agriculture was one of the most notable behavioral transformations in human history, driving innovations in technologies and... more
Is this the moment for universal basic income?  PHYS.ORG · 4 days
Until now, universal basic income—a concept that would give all members of society an unconditional, guaranteed cash payment—has received limited attention among U.S. policymakers. But the coronavirus pandemic may change all that,... more
Croatia's Dubrovnik, home to ancient quarantine facilities  ABC NEWS · 5 days
Just outside the majestic walls of Croatia’s medieval citadel city of Dubrovnik lies a cluster of small stone houses known as the Lazarettos of Dubrovnik, today an art and clubbing hub and a tourist... more
Small horses got smaller, big tapirs got bigger 47 million years ago  PHYS.ORG · 5 days
The former coalfield of Geiseltal in eastern Germany has yielded large numbers of exceptionally preserved fossil animals, giving palaeontologists a unique window into the... more
UFO 'invasion' of NATO war games revealed in 'Project Blue Book' season finale  LIVE SCIENCE · 5 days
UFO sightings during NATO war games in 1952 set the stage for the season finale of "Project Blue Book," the History channel's... more
Study identifies ancestral fragments of DNA associated with hereditary prostate cancer  NEWS MEDICAL · 6 days
Vanderbilt researchers have identified haplotypes, ancestral fragments of DNA, that are associated with hereditary prostate cancer (HPC) in a first-of-its-kind genomic study made possible by the... more
Time symmetry and the laws of physics  PHYS.ORG · 6 days
If three or more objects move around each other, history cannot be reversed. That is the conclusion of an international team of researchers based on computer simulations of three black holes orbiting each other.... more
Meet Wonderchicken, Bird from Final Part of Dinosaur Era  SCI-NEWS.COM · 6 days
A new species of ancient bird has been identified from a nearly complete, three-dimensionally preserved skull and associated... more
As pandemic unfolds, fear and finance collide  PHYS.ORG · 6 days
Despite global efforts to stall the spread of the novel coronavirus, growing fears surrounding the pandemic have caused markets to respond with record-breaking volatility. On Monday, the nation's volatility index, often referred to as... more
Covid-19 pandemic puts illegal wildlife trade in the spotlight  PHYS.ORG · 6 days
Countries around the world are in a state of emergency, with millions of citizens in lockdown, their movements restricted or severely curtailed as a result of the global pandemic unleashed... more
Americans see Trump's virus response through partisan lens  ABC NEWS · 7 days
America has a history of unifying in trying times and rallying around the president more
Trump's 'coup de grace'? Coronavirus tests a divided America  ABC NEWS · 1 week
America has a history of unifying in trying times and rallying around the president more
Global human genomes reveal rich genetic diversity shaped by complex evolutionary history  SCIENCE DAILY · 1 week
A new study has provided the most comprehensive analysis of human genetic diversity to date, after the sequencing of 929 human genomes. The study... more
A pigment from ancient Egypt to modern microscopy  SCIENCE DAILY · 1 week
Egyptian blue is one of the oldest humanmade colour pigments. It adorns the crown of the world famous bust of Nefertiti: but the pigment can do even more. An international research team... more
20 of the worst epidemics and pandemics in history  LIVE SCIENCE · 1 week
Disease outbreaks have ravaged humanity from prehistory to modern times, sometimes changing the course of history and even wiping out entire civilizations. more
Epigenetic inheritance: A 'silver bullet' against climate change?  PHYS.ORG · 1 week
The current pace of climate change exceeds historical events by 1-2 orders of magnitude, which will make it hard for organisms and ecosystems to adapt. For a long time, it has been... more
Scientists assess the accelerated changes of glaciers in the Yulong Snow Mountain  PHYS.ORG · 1 week
The Yulong Snow Mountain (YSM) is a region of temperate glaciers in the southeast Qinghai-Tibetan Plateau. As one of the most famous tourist attractions... more
A look inside the restoration of Notre Dame Cathedral  Science Magazine · 1 week
Scientists lead the way in repairing the cathedral, while discovering historical insights along the way more
Geologists find lost fragment of ancient continent in Canada's North  PHYS.ORG · 1 week
Sifting through diamond exploration samples from Baffin Island, Canadian scientists have identified a new remnant of the North Atlantic craton—an ancient part of Earth's continental crust. more
Maize, not metal, key to native settlements' history in NY  PHYS.ORG · 1 week
New Cornell University research is producing a more accurate historical timeline for the occupation of Native American sites in upstate New York, based on radiocarbon dating of organic... more
Fine-tuning radiocarbon dating could 'rewrite' ancient events  SCIENCE DAILY · 1 week
A new paper points out the need for an important new refinement to radiocarbon dating. The research has relevance for understanding key dates in Mediterranean history and prehistory, including the tomb of Tutankhamen and... more
Fins of prehistoric fish reveal origins of the human hand  REUTERS · 1 week
Inside the stout fins of a fish that prowled the shallow waters of an estuary in... more
Maize, not metal, key to native settlements' history in NY  SCIENCE DAILY · 1 week
New research is producing a more accurate historical timeline for the occupation of Native American sites in upstate New York, based on radiocarbon dating of organic materials and... more
Scientists expect spring floods to be milder than last year  PHYS.ORG · 1 week
Too often disasters come in threes. But the year of global pandemic and record wildfires in Australia will not also be a year of historic floods in the... more
Ancient artifacts on the beaches of Northern Europe, and how we remember music  Science Magazine · 1 week
On this week’s show, host Joel Goldberg talks with science journalist Andrew Curry about archaeological finds from thousands of years ago along... more
Insights into human genetic variation and population history from 929 diverse genomes  Science Magazine · 1 week
Genome sequences from diverse human groups are needed to understand the structure of genetic variation in our species and the history of, and relationships... more
History, mass loss, structure, and dynamic behavior of the Antarctic Ice Sheet  Science Magazine · 1 week
Antarctica contains most of Earth’s fresh water stored in two large ice sheets. The more stable East Antarctic Ice Sheet is larger and older,... more
Global human genomes reveal rich genetic diversity shaped by complex evolutionary history  PHYS.ORG · 1 week
A new study has provided the most comprehensive analysis of human genetic diversity to date, after the sequencing of 929 human genomes by scientists... more
Bone analyses tell about kitchen utensils in the Middle Ages  PHYS.ORG · 1 week
Clay pots? Wooden spoons? Copper pots? Silver forks? What materials has man used for making kitchen utensils throughout history? A new study now sheds light on the use... more
Organellogenesis still a work in progress in novel dinoflagellates  PHYS.ORG · 1 week
Many algae and plant species contain photosynthetic membrane-bound organelles called plastids that are actually remnants of a free-living cyanobacterium. At some point in evolutionary history, a cyanobacterium was engulfed by... more
Ancient teeth reveal Bronze Age gender inequality  PHYS.ORG · 1 week
Analysing 2500-year-old teeth has thrown open a window onto life and gender inequality during Bronze Age China. more
Global warming influence on extreme weather events has been frequently underestimated  SCIENCE DAILY · 2 weeks
Analysis shows global warming is intensifying the occurrence of unprecedented hot spells and downpours faster than predicted by historical trends. more
Fine-tuning radiocarbon dating could 'rewrite' ancient events  PHYS.ORG · 2 weeks
Radiocarbon dating, invented in the late 1940s and improved ever since to provide more precise measurements, is the standard method for determining the dates of artifacts in archaeology and other disciplines. more
National monuments and economic growth in the American West  Science Magazine · 2 weeks
National monuments in the United States are protected lands that contain historic landmarks, historic and prehistoric structures, or other objects of historic or scientific interest. Their designations are often contentious.... more
Ancient fish fossil reveals evolutionary origin of the human hand  PHYS.ORG · 2 weeks
An ancient Elpistostege fish fossil found in Miguasha, Canada has revealed new insights into how the human hand evolved from fish fins. more
People with a cancer history have increased risk of developing atrial fibrillation  NEWS MEDICAL · 2 weeks
People with a history of cancer have an over two-fold risk of developing atrial fibrillation (AFib), the most common heart rhythm disorder, compared to... more
Ancient hornwort genomes could lead to crop improvement  SCIENCE DAILY · 2 weeks
An international research team illuminates the origin of land plants by analyzing the first hornwort genomes. In this ancient group of land plants, they discovered genes that could help crops grow more... more
The life and death of one of America's most mysterious trees  SCIENCE DAILY · 2 weeks
A symbol of life, ancient sundial or just firewood? Tree-ring scientists trace the origin of a tree log unearthed almost a century ago. more
New book offers a journey through the history of 'death-defying' technologies  NEWS MEDICAL · 2 weeks
By the Director for the Centre of Death Studies, a book about death which takes the reader on a journey through the history of 'death-defying' technologies,... more
Mysterious bone circles made from the remains of mammoths reveal clues about Ice Age  SCIENCE DAILY · 2 weeks
Mysterious bone circles made from the remains of dozens of mammoths have revealed clues about how ancient communities survived Europe's... more
The Latest: Mexico's historic crucifixion of Christ altered  ABC NEWS · 2 weeks
Mexico City borough has announced that Latin America's most famous re-enactment of the crucifixion of Christ will be closed to the public for the first time in 177 years to prevent the... more
Mysterious ancient sea-worm pegged as new genus after half-century in 'wastebasket'  SCIENCE DAILY · 2 weeks
Fifty years ago, researchers placed a mystery worm in a 'wastebasket' genus and interest in the lowly critter waned -- until now. more
Mysterious ancient sea-worm pegged as new genus after half-century in 'wastebasket'  PHYS.ORG · 2 weeks
When a partial fossil specimen of a primordial marine worm was unearthed in Utah in 1969, scientists had a tough go identifying it. Usually, such worms... more
Subsurface Mercury: Window to ancient, possibly habitable, volatile-rich materials  PHYS.ORG · 2 weeks
New research raises the possibility that some parts of Mercury's subsurface, and those of similar planets in the galaxy, once could have been capable of fostering prebiotic chemistry, and perhaps... more
First pocket-sized artworks from Ice Age Indonesia show humanity's ancient drive to decorate  PHYS.ORG · 2 weeks
Archaeologists have unearthed two miniature stone engravings in Indonesia. These depict an anoa (dwarf buffalo) and a sun, star or eye dating... more
Government issues historic restrictions amid virus outbreak  ABC NEWS · 2 weeks
The United States has implemented dramatic new restrictions on Americans going out in public more
Mysterious bone circles made from the remains of mammoths reveal clues about Ice Age  PHYS.ORG · 2 weeks
Mysterious bone circles made from the remains of dozens of mammoths have revealed clues about how ancient communities survived Europe's... more
Op-ed | National security launch not ready to commit to commercial practices  SPACE NEWS · 2 weeks
Leveraging commercial practices must not exclude or degrade mission assurance, as history has amply demonstrated. SpaceNews.com more
Scientists Find Mysterious Praying Mantis Petroglyph in Iran  SCI-NEWS.COM · 2 weeks
An international team of archaeologists and entomologists has discovered and examined an ancient arthropod-like petroglyph at the Teymareh rock art... more
Millions holed up at home as virus profoundly shifts US life  ABC NEWS · 2 weeks
Millions of Americans have begun their work weeks holed up at home, as the coronavirus pandemic means the entire nation’s daily routine has shifted in ways... more
Scientists discover pulsating remains of a star in an eclipsing double star system  PHYS.ORG · 2 weeks
Scientists from the University of Sheffield have discovered a pulsating ancient star in a double star system, which will allow them to... more
Millions holed up at home as U.S. routines shift profoundly  ABC NEWS · 2 weeks
Millions of Americans have begun their work weeks holed up at home, as the coronavirus pandemic means the entire nation’s daily routine has shifted in ways never before... more
Ancient mantis-man petroglyph discovered in Iran  SCIENCE DAILY · 2 weeks
A rare rock carving of an insect found in the Teymareh site of Central Iran has been jointly described by a team of entomologists and archaeologists. The petroglyph shows a six-limbed creature with the head and... more
Ancient ballcourt in Mexico suggests game was played in the highlands earlier than thought  PHYS.ORG · 2 weeks
A pair of researchers with George Washington University has found evidence of an ancient ball game played much earlier than... more
Measuring the psychological impact of a health pandemic on stock markets  PHYS.ORG · 2 weeks
Stock markets around the world have taken significant and historic levels of damage this week due to the rapid spread of COVID-19 across the world. more
Stock market rollercoaster: Why high-frequency trading isn't to blame  PHYS.ORG · 2 weeks
Financial forecasting involves predicting an organization's financial future. It typically considers a history of prices, trading volumes or other predictors such as financial statements, interest rates and commodity prices to... more
Technology to screen for higher-yielding crop traits is now more accessible to scientists  PHYS.ORG · 2 weeks
Like many industries, big data is driving innovations in agriculture. Scientists seek to analyze thousands of plants to pinpoint genetic tweaks that... more
Ancient mantis-man petroglyph discovered in Iran  PHYS.ORG · 2 weeks
A unique rock carving found in the Teymareh rock art site (Khomein county) in Central Iran with six limbs has been described as part man, part mantis. Rock carvings, or petroglyphs, of invertebrate animals are rare,... more
Earth's mantle, not its core, may have generated planet's early magnetic field  SCIENCE DAILY · 2 weeks
A trio of studies are the latest developments in a paradigm shift that could change how Earth history is understood. They support an assertion... more
Prehistoric hyenas and humans share migration patterns  PHYS.ORG · 2 weeks
New research into the evolutionary history and prehistoric migrations of hyenas reveals surprising similarities between hyenas and prehistoric humans. The results from the University of Copenhagen and University of Potsdam also indicate that humans... more
Hornwort genomes could lead to crop improvement  PHYS.ORG · 2 weeks
Some 500 million years ago—when our continents were likely connected in a single land mass and most life existed underwater—hornworts were one of the first groups of plants to colonize land. But biologists have... more
Archaeologists Unearth Long-Lost Capital of Ancient Maya Kingdom  SCI-NEWS.COM · 2 weeks
Archaeologists excavating the site of Lacanja Tzeltal in Mexico have discovered the ruins of the capital of a kingdom known... more
What is a pandemic?  LIVE SCIENCE · 2 weeks
A pandemic is the global outbreak of a disease. There are many examples in history, the most recent being the COVID-19 pandemic. more
Spanish flu: The deadliest pandemic in history  LIVE SCIENCE · 2 weeks
Over 100 years ago, a killer strain of the influenza virus infected over a third of the world's population. more
Scientists are leading Notre Dame’s restoration—and probing mysteries laid bare by its devastating fire  Science Magazine · 2 weeks
Researchers use cathedral’s stones, wood, and lead to learn about its history and the best way to repair it more
Metabolic fossils from the origin of life  SCIENCE DAILY · 2 weeks
Since the origin of life, metabolic networks provide cells with nutrition and energy. Modern networks require thousands of enzymes that perform catalysis. Such networks must have arisen from simpler precursors. Investigating the metabolism of... more
Ancient flooding formed, left behind boulders in Wildcat Ridge  PHYS.ORG · 2 weeks
One year ago, a historic flood struck Nebraska, topping levees; taking out bridges, dams and houses; covering thousands of acres in water; and reminding Nebraskans of the power of a... more
How AI could help translate the written language of ancient civilizations  PHYS.ORG · 2 weeks
Twenty-five centuries ago, the "paperwork" of Persia's Achaemenid Empire was recorded on clay tablets—tens of thousands of which were discovered in 1933 in modern-day Iran by... more
Ancient Maya kingdom unearthed in a backyard in Mexico  PHYS.ORG · 2 weeks
Associate professor of anthropology Charles Golden and his colleagues have found the long-lost capital of an ancient Maya kingdom in the backyard of a Mexican cattle rancher. more
Scottish storms unearth 1,500-year-old Viking-era cemetery  LIVE SCIENCE · 2 weeks
Powerful storms on Scotland's Orkney Islands exposed ancient human remains in a Pictish and Viking cemetery. more
St. Patrick's Day parades nixed, from New York to Dublin  ABC NEWS · 2 weeks
Gov. Andrew Cuomo says the New York City St. Patrick’s Day Parade has been postponed for the first time in its 258-year history because of coronavirus concerns more
Dinosaur stomping ground in Scotland reveals thriving middle Jurassic ecosystem  SCIENCE DAILY · 3 weeks
During the Middle Jurassic Period, the Isle of Skye in Scotland was home to a thriving community of dinosaurs that stomped across the ancient coastline, according to a... more
Quaternary climate changes as speciation drivers in the Amazon floodplains  Science Magazine · 3 weeks
The role of climate as a speciation driver in the Amazon has long been discussed. Phylogeographic studies have failed to recover synchronous demographic responses across taxa, although recent... more
Dinosaur stomping ground in Scotland reveals thriving middle Jurassic ecosystem  PHYS.ORG · 3 weeks
During the Middle Jurassic Period, the Isle of Skye in Scotland was home to a thriving community of dinosaurs that stomped across the ancient coastline, according to a... more
Major Greenland glacier collapse 90 years ago linked to climate change  PHYS.ORG · 3 weeks
Ninety years ago there were no satellites to detect changes in Greenland's coastal glaciers, but a new study combining historical photos with evidence from ocean sediments... more
The second person cured from HIV goes public  NEWS MEDICAL · 3 weeks
In the 1980s and early 1990s, the outbreak of HIV and AIDS swept across the globe. Today, more than 70 million people have been infected with HIV, and about 35 million have... more
MORE SCIENCE VIDEO
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