History
480-million-year-old fossils reveal sea lilies' ancient roots  PHYS.ORG · 17 hours
Sea lilies, despite their name, aren't plants. They're animals related to starfish and sea urchins, with long feathery arms resting atop a stalk that keeps them anchored to the ocean floor. Sea lilies have... more
CRISPR-resistant viruses build 'safe rooms' to shield genomes from DNA-dicing enzymes  PHYS.ORG · 18 hours
Bacteria and the viruses that infect them are engaged in a molecular arms race as ancient as life itself. Evolution has equipped bacteria with an arsenal... more
Laser scanning leads to 3-D rendering of Robber's Cave  PHYS.ORG · 18 hours
As bits of Robber's Cave history fade to folklore, the thousands of engravings that crowd its Dakota sandstone walls like graffiti are likewise disintegrating, imperceptibly but inevitably, into miniature dunes... more
Climate scientists try to cut their own carbon footprints  PHYS.ORG · 2 days
For years, Kim Cobb was the Indiana Jones of climate science. The Georgia Tech professor flew to the caves of Borneo to study ancient and current climate conditions. She jetted... more
How to build a 3D map of the universe - and why  nanowerk · 3 days
Because we don't know what?s pushing the universe outward ever more quickly, 'dark energy' is scientists? shorthand for the mysterious process. To understand the... more
Discovery of genes involved in the biosynthesis of antidepressant  PHYS.ORG · 4 days
St. John's Wort (Hypericum perforatum) is an ancient medicinal plant. It is known for the mild antidepressant properties of its bioactive compound hypericin, which is produced in the dark glands... more
Why some scientists want to rewrite the history of how we learned to walk  PHYS.ORG · 4 days
It's not often that a fossil truly rewrites human evolution, but the recent discovery of an ancient extinct ape has... more
Cuneiform reveals shared birthplace  PHYS.ORG · 4 days
Assyriologists in Leiden have been conducting research into ancient clay tablets from the Middle East for 100 years already. What exactly do these clay tablets tell us? And why is Leiden such a good place to study them? more
A 6,000-year-old fruit fly gave the world modern cheeses and yogurts  PHYS.ORG · 4 days
Historians often trace the dawn of human civilization back 10,000 years, when Neolithic tribes first settled and began farming in the Fertile Crescent, which stretches through... more
New Fossil Fills Gap in Evolution of Comma Shrimps  SCI-NEWS.COM · 5 days
A new species of comma shrimp that lived during the mid-Cretaceous period, between 95 and 90 million years... more
Extinction filters mediate the global effects of habitat fragmentation on animals  Science Magazine · 5 days
Habitat loss is the primary driver of biodiversity decline worldwide, but the effects of fragmentation (the spatial arrangement of remaining habitat) are debated. We tested the... more
New cretaceous mammal provides evidence for separation of hearing and chewing modules  PHYS.ORG · 5 days
A joint research team led by Mao Fangyuan from the Institute of Vertebrate Paleontology and Paleoanthropology (IVPP) of the Chinese Academy of Sciences and... more
Long-distance timber trade underpinned the Roman Empire's construction  SCIENCE DAILY · 5 days
The ancient Romans relied on long-distance timber trading to construct their empire, according to a new study. more
Brazen Thieves Plunder Priceless Jewels and Historic Artifacts in 2 Heists in Germany  LIVE SCIENCE · 5 days
In two daring heists that took place just days apart in Germany, burglars stole precious gems and artifacts from museums in two... more
Historic US towns endured wars, storms. What about sea rise?  PHYS.ORG · 5 days
Historic cities and towns along the Southeastern U.S. coast have survived wars, hurricanes, disease outbreaks and other calamities, but now that sea levels are creeping up with no... more
Solving Fossil Mystery Could Aid Mars Life Quest  ASTRO WATCH · 5 days
The search for evidence of life on Mars could be helped by fresh insights into ancient rocks on Earth. Research... more
Long-distance timber trade underpinned the Roman Empire's construction  PHYS.ORG · 6 days
The ancient Romans relied on long-distance timber trading to construct their empire, according to a study published December 4, 2019 in the open-access journal PLOS ONE by Mauro Bernabei from the National... more
Parker Solar Probe traces solar wind to its source on sun's surface: coronal holes  PHYS.ORG · 6 days
A year ago, NASA's Parker Solar Probe flew closer to the sun than any satellite in history, collecting a spectacular... more
Trump's border wall threatens an Arizona oasis with a long, diverse history  PHYS.ORG · 6 days
A few hundred yards from the Mexican border in southern Arizona lies a quiet pond, about the size of two football fields, called Quitobaquito.... more
Justinianic plague did not wipe out the Romans as history books tell us  NEWS MEDICAL · 6 days
A new study has revealed that it was not plague that killed half of the world’s population and thus proved to be... more
Great Barrier Reef study shows how reef copes with rapid sea-level rise  PHYS.ORG · 7 days
A new study into the recent history of the Great Barrier Reef has shown how it responds to rapid sea-level rise and other environmental... more
2010s hottest decade in history, UN says as emissions rise again  PHYS.ORG · 7 days
This decade is set to be the hottest in history, the United Nations said Tuesday in an annual assessment outlining the ways in which climate change... more
Two chiral catalysts working hand in hand  PHYS.ORG · 7 days
Just as our left hand is not superposable to our right hand, the mirror image of certain molecules cannot be overlapped onto it, even when turned or twisted. These two mirror images are referred... more
Genetic testing results help woman to make decisions about her treatment and preventive care  NEWS MEDICAL · 7 days
Wendy Richardson, 52, of Ridgefield, Connecticut, has always been aware that she has a strong family history of cancer. more
Food fights: How history shapes what we eat–and why  PHYS.ORG · 7 days
Everybody eats. But what people eat, and what drives our decisions about food, vary tremendously. more
Unexpected versatility of an ancient DNA repair factor revealed  NEWS MEDICAL · 1 week
If a bone breaks or a tendon snaps, you know to seek treatment immediately. But your most fragile and precious cellular commodity, chromosomal DNA, breaks with astounding frequency- some estimate... more
75-year old blood-stained microscope slide reveals historical spread of malaria  NEWS MEDICAL · 1 week
DNA from 75-year old eradicated European malaria parasites uncovers the historical spread of one of the two most common forms of the disease, Plasmodium vivax, from Europe to... more
1940s blood samples reveal historical spread of malaria  SCIENCE DAILY · 1 week
DNA from 75-year old eradicated European malaria parasites uncovers the historical spread of one of the two most common forms of the disease, Plasmodium vivax, from Europe to the Americas during the... more
1940s blood samples reveal historical spread of malaria  PHYS.ORG · 1 week
DNA from 75-year old eradicated European malaria parasites uncovers the historical spread of one of the two most common forms of the disease, Plasmodium vivax, from Europe to the Americas during the... more
Researchers reveal unexpected versatility of an ancient DNA repair factor  PHYS.ORG · 1 week
If a bone breaks or a tendon snaps, you know to seek treatment immediately. But your most fragile and precious cellular commodity, chromosomal DNA, breaks with astounding frequency—some... more
How ancient microbes created massive ore deposits, set stage for early life  SCIENCE DAILY · 1 week
Ancestors of modern bacteria cultured from an iron-rich lake in Democratic Republic of Congo could have been key to keeping Earth's dimly lit early... more
95-million-year-old fossil reveals new group of pterosaurs  PHYS.ORG · 1 week
Ancient flying reptiles known as pterosaurs were much more diverse than originally thought, according to a new study by an international group of paleontologists. more
Astronaut Luca feeling the force, to advance rover control  PHYS.ORG · 1 week
ESA astronaut Luca Parmitano has made robotics history, reaching out from the International Space Station in orbit around Earth at 8 km/s, to control an Earth-based rover, equipped with an... more
Cretaceous-Period Mammal Had Bizarre Middle Ear  SCI-NEWS.COM · 2 weeks
Paleontologists in China have unearthed a nearly complete skeleton of a previously unknown Cretaceous mammal species with well-preserved middle ear bones. The ancient creature... more
Astronaut Luca feeling the force, to advance rover control  ESA · 2 weeks
ESA astronaut Luca Parmitano has made robotics history, reaching out from the International Space Station in orbit around... more
Ostrich eggshell beads reveal 10,000 years of cultural interaction across Africa  SCIENCE DAILY · 2 weeks
Researchers present an expanded analysis of African ostrich eggshell beads, testing the hypothesis that larger beads signal the arrival of herders. The data reveals a more... more
Barbequed clams on the menu for ancient Puerto Ricans  PHYS.ORG · 2 weeks
Scientists have reconstructed the cooking techniques of the early inhabitants of Puerto Rico by analysing the remains of clams. more
Medical News Today: Rapamycin has anti-aging effect on human skin  MNT · 2 weeks
A small study reveals that rapamycin, a drug with a long history as an immune suppressor, can improve tone and reduce wrinkles and sagging in human skin. more
New Cretaceous mammal fossil sheds light on evolution of middle ear  PHYS.ORG · 2 weeks
Researchers from the Institute of Vertebrate Paleontology and Paleoanthropology (IVPP) of the Chinese Academy of Sciences and the American Museum of Natural History (AMNH) have reported... more
Oyster deaths: American slipper limpet is innocent  PHYS.ORG · 2 weeks
Natural history collections are unique archives of biodiversity. They document how living things transform over time and what effects aspects like climate change or other man-made environmental changes have on their distribution. A good... more
Impact crater data analysis of Ryugu asteroid illuminates complicated geological history  PHYS.ORG · 2 weeks
Analysis of the impact craters on Ryugu using the spacecraft Hayabusa 2's remote sensing image data has illuminated the geological history of the Near-Earth asteroid. more
Researchers show how feathers propel birds through air and history  PHYS.ORG · 2 weeks
Birds of a feather may flock together, but the feathers of birds differ altogether. more
Fish kills and undrinkable water: Here's what to expect for the Murray Darling this summer  PHYS.ORG · 2 weeks
A grim summer is likely for the rivers of the Murray-Darling Basin and the people, flora and fauna... more
ESA’s Mars Express Orbiter Spots Fractured Ice Sheets  SCI-NEWS.COM · 2 weeks
The two Martian hemispheres are drastically different; the smooth northern lowlands sit up to 3 km below the rugged southern... more
Conservation of biodiversity is like an insurance policy for the future of mankind  PHYS.ORG · 2 weeks
Fens and bogs are valuable research environments for paleoecologists due to ancient fossils that have survived in the peatland for thousands of... more
Did human hunting activities alone drive great auks' extinction?  PHYS.ORG · 2 weeks
New insight on the extinction history of a flightless seabird that vanished from the shores of the North Atlantic during the 19th century has been published today in eLife. more
Scientists inch closer than ever to signal from cosmic dawn  SCIENCE DAILY · 2 weeks
Researchers have taken a new and significant step toward detecting a signal from the period in cosmic history when the first stars lit up the universe. more
Did human hunting activities alone drive great auks' extinction?  SCIENCE DAILY · 2 weeks
New insight on the extinction history of a flightless seabird that vanished from the shores of the North Atlantic during the 19th century has been published today. more
Scientists inch closer than ever to signal from cosmic dawn  PHYS.ORG · 2 weeks
Around 12 billion years ago, the universe emerged from a great cosmic dark age as the first stars and galaxies lit up. With a new analysis of data... more
Scientists inch closer than ever to signal from cosmic dawn  nanowerk · 2 weeks
Researchers using the Murchison Widefield Array radio telescope have taken a new and significant step toward detecting a signal from the period in cosmic history when the first... more
Socioeconomic status in the US harder to change than any time in past 150 years  PHYS.ORG · 2 weeks
For a certain population subset, socioeconomic status in the United States is harder to change now than at... more
Human migration out of Africa may have followed monsoons in the Middle East  PHYS.ORG · 2 weeks
Last year, scientists announced that a human jawbone and prehistoric tools found in 2002 in Misliya Cave, on the western edge of... more
High school athletes with a history of concussions may be at increased risk for suicide  NEWS MEDICAL · 2 weeks
Concussion, the most common form of traumatic brain injury, has been linked to an increased risk of depression... more
Living at the edge of an active volcano: Risk from lava flows on Mount Etna  PHYS.ORG · 2 weeks
On Mt. Etna volcano, inhabited areas have been inundated repeatedly by lava flows in historical times. The increasing... more
Smoker-survivor genes may have long ancestral history of fighting toxins  PHYS.ORG · 2 weeks
Longevity genes that helped humans survive ancient airborne toxins may be the same genes that make humans resilient to pollution from fossil fuels and cigarette smoke today, according... more
Concussions in high school athletes may be a risk factor for suicide  SCIENCE DAILY · 2 weeks
Concussion, the most common form of traumatic brain injury, has been linked to an increased risk of depression and suicide in adults. Now new... more
Living at the edge of an active volcano: Risk from lava flows on Mount Etna  SCIENCE DAILY · 2 weeks
On Mt. Etna volcano, inhabited areas have been inundated repeatedly by lava flows in historical times. The increasing... more
Smoker-survivor genes may have long ancestral history of fighting toxins  SCIENCE DAILY · 2 weeks
Longevity genes that helped humans survive ancient airborne toxins may be the same genes that make humans resilient to pollution from fossil fuels and cigarette smoke today, according... more
Aquatic microorganisms offer important window on the history of life  SCIENCE DAILY · 2 weeks
Researchers describe a new method for investigating the genomes of eukaryotic flagellate organisms. These elusive aquatic creatures may offer clues about LECA -- the progenitor of all complex... more
Aquatic microorganisms offer important window on the history of life  PHYS.ORG · 2 weeks
The air, earth and water of our planet are pulsating with living things. Yet, a vast and diverse web of life exists, about which almost nothing is known.... more
Long-Hidden 3D Scan of Ancient Egyptian Nefertiti Bust Finally Revealed  LIVE SCIENCE · 2 weeks
The "Bust of Nefertiti" was scanned years ago by the Egyptian Museum and Papyrus Collection in Berlin, but the scan was not previously available. more
Celebrating 60 years of the Proton Synchrotron  CERN · 2 weeks
Celebrating 60 years of the Proton Synchrotron cmenard Mon, 11/25/2019 - 10:01 On 24 November 1959, CERN’s Proton Synchrotron became the highest-energy machine in the world when it accelerated a beam to its design... more
In a first for cell biology, scientists observe ribosome assembly in real time  PHYS.ORG · 3 weeks
A team of scientists from Scripps Research and Stanford University has recorded in real time a key step in the assembly of... more
Your RNA May Have Come from Space, Meteor Study Suggests  LIVE SCIENCE · 3 weeks
Scientists have detected ribose and other bioessential sugars in ancient meteorite samples for the first time, suggesting that RNA may have come from space and played a crucial... more
Growing length of manifestos casts new light on electioneering history  PHYS.ORG · 3 weeks
From a modest 150 words to the length of a children's book—the number of words used by politicians in their election manifestos has grown substantially in the past... more
Scientists develop new method to estimate seal breeding frequency  PHYS.ORG · 3 weeks
New research, led by the Sea Mammal Research Unit (SMRU) at the University of St Andrews, develops method to better record breeding histories of seals, allowing for improved fecundity calculations. more
Beautifully Preserved Skull of 'Biblical Snake' with Hind Legs Discovered  LIVE SCIENCE · 3 weeks
Scientists have unearthed an amazingly preserved skull of an ancient snake with hind limbs, revealing more about the origin of snakes and how they lost their legs. more
Impaired gene expression may influence aging via altered cellular metabolism  NEWS MEDICAL · 3 weeks
Throughout history, humans have been obsessed with finding a way to prevent aging and prolong life. Although the mechanisms have long eluded us, modern science is revealing more... more
New fossils shed light on how snakes got their bite and lost their legs  PHYS.ORG · 3 weeks
New fossils of an ancient legged snake, called Najash, shed light on the origin of the slithering reptiles. more
Changing sport restrictions for pediatric congenital heart disease patients  NEWS MEDICAL · 3 weeks
Historically, providers were restrictive in allowing children with congenital heart disease (CHD) to participate in youth sports, or even regular exercise. more
Two Cosmic Peacocks show Violent History of the Magellanic Clouds  ASTRO WATCH · 3 weeks
Two peacock-shaped gaseous clouds were revealed in the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC) by observations with the... more
Slowing down: Is aging caused by decreased cellular metabolism?  PHYS.ORG · 3 weeks
Throughout history, humans have been obsessed with finding a way to prevent aging and prolong life. Although the mechanisms have long eluded us, modern science is revealing more and more... more
New geologic modeling method explains collapse of ancient mountains in American West  PHYS.ORG · 3 weeks
By using the latest computer numerical modeling technologies, combined with geologic compilations and seismic data, researchers in the Department of Geosciences at Stony Brook... more
Historic climate change on Mars might be detectable  PHYS.ORG · 3 weeks
Historical instances of extreme climate change on Mars could be detected through the measurement of subsurface temperatures, according to a new University of Stirling study. more
Ancient komodo dragon-like animals had heads proportionally larger than dinosaurs  PHYS.ORG · 3 weeks
An international team of researchers has found evidence showing that the ancient meat-eating creature Vjushkovia triplicostata had a proportionally larger head than any known dinosaur. In their paper... more
Scientists use modern technology to understand how ochre paint was created in pictographs  SCIENCE DAILY · 3 weeks
Ochre was often used as a vivid red paint in ancient rock art known as pictographs. Despite its broad use throughout human... more
Evidence of two quakes extends rupture history in Grand Tetons National Park  PHYS.ORG · 3 weeks
Hand-dug trenches around Leigh Lake in Grand Teton National Park in Wyoming reveal evidence for a previously unknown surface-faulting earthquake in along the Teton... more
Modern technology reconstructs properties of ochre, commonly found in ancient rock art  PHYS.ORG · 3 weeks
Ochre, one of Earth's oldest naturally occurring materials, was often used as a vivid red paint in ancient rock art known as pictographs across... more
Trash talk hurts, even when it comes from a robot  SCIENCE DAILY · 3 weeks
Trash talking has a long and colorful history of flustering game opponents, and now researchers have demonstrated that discouraging words can be perturbing even when uttered by a... more
Infants from 2100 years ago found with helmets made of children's skulls  PHYS.ORG · 3 weeks
A team of researchers from the University of North Carolina at Charlotte and Universidad Técnica de Manabí in Ecuador has found and reported on... more
New species of seaweed uncovered by genetic analyses  PHYS.ORG · 3 weeks
Genetic analyses have revealed remarkably higher species diversity in common red seaweed than previously assumed. It was thought that there were only five related species of the Gloiopeltis genus (known as 'funori'... more
Ancient Humanoid-Shaped Nazca Line Discovered in Peruvian Desert  LIVE SCIENCE · 3 weeks
A sprawling humanoid-shaped Nazca Line etched into the Peruvian desert has just been discovered by a team of scientists using artificial intelligence. more
Physicists Just Created the Most Detailed Simulation of the Universe in History  LIVE SCIENCE · 3 weeks
An international team of scientists has created the most detailed large-scale model of the universe to date, a simulation they call TNG50. more
Paleontologists Unearth Another Giant Penguin in New Zealand  SCI-NEWS.COM · 3 weeks
Paleontologists in New Zealand have uncovered a nearly complete skeleton of a giant-sized penguin that swam the oceans about 27... more
Side effects mild, brief with single antidepressant dose of intravenous ketamine  SCIENCE DAILY · 3 weeks
Researchers found that a single, low-dose ketamine infusion was relatively free of side effects for patients with treatment-resistant depression. Widespread off-label use of intravenous subanesthetic-dose ketamine... more
Mars scientists investigate ancient life in Australia  PHYS.ORG · 3 weeks
As any geologist worth his or her salt will tell you, there are rocks, and then there are rocks. Next July, NASA and the European Space Agency (ESA) are launching rovers to Mars that... more
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