Evolution
Human heart evolved to adapt to the demands of life, study says  NEWS MEDICAL · 2 hours
The human heart underwent major physical changes throughout history, based on what activities or lifestyle people had, a new study found. As a result,... more
Rare 10 million-year-old fossil unearths new view of human evolution  SCIENCE DAILY · 3 hours
Near an old mining town in Central Europe, known for its picturesque turquoise-blue quarry water, lay Rudapithecus. For 10 million years, the fossilized ape waited in Rudabánya, Hungary,... more
Rare 10 million-year-old fossil unearths new view of human evolution  PHYS.ORG · 3 hours
Near an old mining town in Central Europe, known for its picturesque turquoise-blue quarry water, lay Rudapithecus. For 10 million years, the fossilized ape waited in Rudabánya, Hungary,... more
UM study abroad students fuel understanding of gaps in conservation data  PHYS.ORG · 5 hours
Animals around the globe face rising extinction rates, but there is often a lack of data about the causes of population declines, as well as ecological... more
Crucial role of recycling in the evolution of life in our universe  SCIENCE DAILY · 5 hours
New research by astrophysicists reveals how the gas and energy expelled by stars are returned to the universe, and in what forms. It also... more
Elusive compounds of greenhouse gas isolated  SCIENCE DAILY · 5 hours
Nitrous oxide (N2O) is a potent atmospheric pollutant. Although naturally occurring, anthropogenic N2O emissions from intensive agricultural fertilization, industrial processes, and combustion of fossil fuels and biomass are a major cause for concern. Researchers have isolated... more
Elusive compounds of greenhouse gas isolated  PHYS.ORG · 7 hours
Nitrous oxide (N2O) is a potent atmospheric pollutant. Although naturally occurring, anthropogenic N2O emissions from intensive agricultural fertilisation, industrial processes, and combustion of fossil fuels and biomass are a major cause for concern. Researchers at the... more
Why the global Red List mislabels the risk to many species  PHYS.ORG · 9 hours
When we talk about how threatened animals or plants are, we will almost always reference their statuses on the Red List. Created by the International Union... more
Research reveals vital clues about recycling in the evolution of life in our universe  PHYS.ORG · 9 hours
New research by Kent astrophysicists reveals vital clues about the role recycling plays in the formation of life in our... more
Genomics provides evidence of glacial refugia in Scandinavia  PHYS.ORG · 10 hours
Evolutionary research on a grass-like, flowering perennial called the northern single-spike sedge has offered some of the first proof of ice-free locations, or glacial refugia, in Northern Europe during Earth's most recent... more
Earth to warm more quickly, new climate models show  PHYS.ORG · 13 hours
Greenhouse gases thrust into the atmosphere by burning fossil fuels are warming Earth's surface more quickly than previously understood, according to new climate models set to replace those used in... more
Geochemists measure new composition of Earth's mantle  SCIENCE DAILY · 1 day
Geochemists have investigated the volcanic rocks that build up the Portuguese island group of the Azores in order to gather new information about the compositional evolution of the Earth's interior. The results suggest that... more
Human hearts evolved for endurance  SCIENCE DAILY · 1 day
Major physical changes occurred in the human heart as people shifted from hunting and foraging to farming and modern life. As a result, human hearts are now less 'ape-like' and better suited to endurance types of activity. more
Taking evolution to heart  PHYS.ORG · 1 day
An international research group at UBC, Harvard University and Cardiff Metropolitan University has discovered how the human heart has adapted to support endurance physical activities. This research examines how the human heart has evolved and how it adapts in response... more
Geochemists measure new composition of Earth's mantle  PHYS.ORG · 1 day
What is the chemical composition of the Earth's interior? Because it is impossible to drill more than about ten kilometres deep into the Earth, volcanic rocks formed by melting Earth's deep interior often provide... more
Extinct Canary Island bird was not a unique species after all, DNA tests prove  PHYS.ORG · 1 day
DNA tests have proven an extinct bird species unique to the Canary Islands—whose loss was considered a sizeable blow for... more
Help track 4 billion bogong moths with your smartphone–and save pygmy possums from extinction  PHYS.ORG · 1 day
Each year, from September to mid-October, the tiny and very precious mountain pygmy-possums arise from their months of hibernation under... more
A modeling tool to rapidly predict weed spread risk  PHYS.ORG · 1 day
In the study, published in the journal Methods in Ecology and Evolution, the researchers developed the tool that uses information about the features of a weed species and the geography... more
Lower carbon dioxide emissions on the horizon for cement  PHYS.ORG · 1 day
Concrete is the most widely used building material in the world. As a key component of concrete, cement—and more specifically its production process—is a significant contributor to climate change. Every... more
How can evolutionary biology help to get rid of antibiotic resistant bacteria?  PHYS.ORG · 1 day
Craig MacLean, Professor of Evolution and Microbiology at Oxford's Department of Zoology, explains how evolutionary biology can help us to get rid of antibiotic... more
Mass extinctions made life on Earth more diverse, and might again  PHYS.ORG · 1 day
In the past half-billion years, Earth has been hit again and again by mass extinctions, wiping out most species on the planet. And every time, life... more
Ancient Australia was home to strange marsupial giants, some weighing over 1,000 kg  SCIENCE DAILY · 3 days
Palorchestid marsupials, an extinct group of Australian megafauna, had strange bodies and lifestyles unlike any living species. more
New way to target cancer's diversity and evolution  SCIENCE DAILY · 4 days
Scientists have revealed close-up details of a vital molecule involved in the mix and match of genetic information within cells -- opening up the potential to target proteins of this family to... more
Ancient Australia was home to strange marsupial giants, some weighing over 1,000 kg  PHYS.ORG · 4 days
Palorchestid marsupials, an extinct group of Australian megafauna, had strange bodies and lifestyles unlike any living species, according to a study released... more
Meet Mystriosaurus laurillardi, Marine Crocodile from Jurassic Period  SCI-NEWS.COM · 4 days
An incomplete crocodile skull found near the city of Altdorf in Bavaria, southern Germany, in the 1770s has been recognized... more
Waterhemp has evolved resistance to 4 herbicide sites of action  SCIENCE DAILY · 4 days
When a waterhemp biotype in eastern Nebraska survived a post-emergent application of the PPO inhibitor fomesafen, scientists decided to take a close look. They discovered the population was... more
Extinction of Icelandic walrus coincides with Norse settlement  SCIENCE DAILY · 4 days
An international collaboration of scientists has for the first time used ancient DNA analyses and C14-dating to demonstrate the past existence of a unique population of Icelandic walrus that went extinct shortly... more
Researchers find waterhemp has evolved resistance to four herbicide sites of action  PHYS.ORG · 4 days
A research study featured in the journal Weed Science provides worrisome new details about the evolution of herbicide resistance in waterhemp—an annual weed that... more
Extinction of Icelandic walrus coincides with Norse settlement  PHYS.ORG · 4 days
An international collaboration of scientists in Iceland, Denmark and the Netherlands has for the first time used ancient DNA analyses and C14-dating to demonstrate the past existence of a unique population of... more
Could fungi save the fashion world?  PHYS.ORG · 4 days
Environmental action group Extinction Rebellion is disrupting London Fashion Week to highlight the harms of throwaway culture and the concurrent climate emergency that the clothing market contributes to. Calling for the cancellation of future fashion weeks... more
SLIPS and pitfalls: Synthetic surfaces inspired by a pitcher pitfall trap  PHYS.ORG · 4 days
Our understanding of how to manipulate and control liquids in technology has been transformed by the functional surfaces evolved by living organisms to interact with their... more
Multidrug resistance: Not as recent as we thought  SCIENCE DAILY · 4 days
Researchers have found that the ancient RND-type multidrug efflux pump AcrB from Haemophilus influenzae targets the same drugs as its more evolved counterpart from Escherichia coli, showing that multidrug resistance is an... more
Multidrug resistance: Not as recent as we thought  PHYS.ORG · 4 days
Researchers from Osaka University have made the striking discovery that multidrug-resistant bacteria may have been around longer than we thought. In findings published this month in Communications Biology, the researchers investigated the... more
Behavioral and neural correlates of hide-and-seek in rats  Science Magazine · 5 days
Evolutionary, cognitive, and neural underpinnings of mammalian play are not yet fully elucidated. We played hide-and-seek, an elaborate role-play game, with rats. We did not offer food rewards but engaged in playful... more
Building mountain biodiversity: Geological and evolutionary processes  Science Magazine · 5 days
Mountain regions are unusually biodiverse, with rich aggregations of small-ranged species that form centers of endemism. Mountains play an array of roles for Earth’s biodiversity and affect neighboring lowlands through biotic interchange, changes in... more
Why is Earth so biologically diverse? Mountains hold the answer  PHYS.ORG · 5 days
What determines global patterns of biodiversity has been a puzzle for scientists since the days of von Humboldt, Darwin, and Wallace. Yet, despite two centuries of research, this... more
Mysterious Jurassic crocodile identified 250 years after fossil find  SCIENCE DAILY · 5 days
A prehistoric crocodile that lived around 180 million years ago has been identified -- almost 250 years after the discovery of it fossil remains. more
Jurassic crocodile identified in fossil study  PHYS.ORG · 5 days
A prehistoric crocodile that lived around 180 million years ago has been identified—almost 250 years after the discovery of its fossil remains. more
Extinct Kangaroo Had Feeding Habits Similar to Giant Panda  SCI-NEWS.COM · 5 days
An analysis of the skull biomechanics of Simosthenurus occidentalis, a species of giant short-faced kangaroo that persisted until... more
Fossil fuel emissions impact Arctic snow chemistry, scientists find  PHYS.ORG · 5 days
Perennial sea ice is rapidly melting in the Arctic, clearing the way for new shipping routes and fossil fuel extraction. This increased activity could have unexpected impacts on the natural... more
SDSU professors study the sensory impact of food and evolution of healthy eating  NEWS MEDICAL · 6 days
"We eat first with our eyes." This comment has been attributed to Marcus Gavius Apicius, a 1st Century Roman gourmand. Two thousand... more
Female gorillas must balance the reproductive costs of staying with or leaving an older male  PHYS.ORG · 6 days
When a gorilla group's silverback is close to the end of his reproductive years, females face a dilemma:... more
Digital records of preserved plants and animals change how scientists explore the world  SCIENCE DAILY · 6 days
There's a whole world behind the scenes at natural history museums that most people never see -- millions upon millions of dinosaur... more
Professors examine what influences healthy, sustainable food choices  SCIENCE DAILY · 6 days
A team of marketing professors have studied the sensory impact of food and the evolution of healthy eating. more
Long before other fish, ancient sharks found an alternative way to feed  SCIENCE DAILY · 6 days
Researchers have used tools developed to explore 3D movements and mechanics of modern-day fish jaws to analyze a fossil fish for the first time. more
Reconstructing the evolution of all species  SCIENCE DAILY · 6 days
By looking into fossil teeth from almost 2 million years old rhinos, researchers have launched a new molecular method for studying the evolutionary history of fossil species dating back millions of years. more
A Goldilocks zone for planet size  SCIENCE DAILY · 6 days
Researchers have described a new, lower size limit for planets to maintain surface liquid water for long periods of time, extending the so-called Habitable or 'Goldilocks'' Zone for small, low-gravity planets. This research expands the search... more
Digital records of preserved plants and animals change how scientists explore the world  PHYS.ORG · 6 days
There's a whole world behind the scenes at natural history museums that most people never see. Museum collections house millions upon millions... more
Crushing bite of giant kangaroos of ice age Australia  SCIENCE DAILY · 6 days
An in-depth analysis of the skull biomechanics of a giant extinct kangaroo demonstrates that the animal had a capacity for high-performance crushing of foods, suggesting feeding behaviors more similar to... more
High-performance suction feeding in an early elasmobranch  Science Magazine · 6 days
High-performance suction feeding is often presented as a classic innovation of ray-finned fishes, likely contributing to their remarkable evolutionary success, whereas sharks, with seemingly less sophisticated jaws, are generally portrayed as morphologically conservative throughout... more
Aluminum-26 chronology of dust coagulation and early solar system evolution  Science Magazine · 6 days
Dust condensation and coagulation in the early solar system are the first steps toward forming the terrestrial planets, but the time scales of these processes remain poorly constrained.... more
Canadia spinosa and the early evolution of the annelid nervous system  Science Magazine · 6 days
Annelid worms are a disparate, primitively segmented clade of bilaterians that first appear during the early Cambrian Period. Reconstructing their early evolution is complicated by the... more
Long before other fish, ancient sharks found an alternative way to feed  PHYS.ORG · 6 days
Researchers from the University of Chicago have used tools developed to explore 3-D movements and mechanics of modern-day fish jaws to analyze a fossil... more
'Game-changing' research could solve evolution mysteries  PHYS.ORG · 6 days
An evolution revolution has begun after scientists extracted genetic information from a 1.7 million-year-old rhino tooth—the largest and oldest genetic data to ever be recorded. more
12,000-year-old swamp brimming with bones reveals the ecosystem of the dodo  PHYS.ORG · 6 days
An 1832 description of a swamp said that that it was so full of extinct animal bones that you only had to stick your hand in... more
Scientists identify rare evolutionary intermediates to understand the origin of eukaryotes  PHYS.ORG · 6 days
A new study by Yale scientists provides a key insight into a milestone event in the early evolution of life on Earth—the origin of the cell... more
Scientists create embryos to save northern white rhinos  PHYS.ORG · 6 days
Conservationists have successfully created two northern white rhino embryos in a key step towards pulling the species back from the brink of extinction, scientists in Italy said Wednesday. more
New Pterosaur Species Identified in Canada  SCI-NEWS.COM · 6 days
Cretaceous pterosaur remains discovered in the Dinosaur Park Formation in Alberta have been identified as a new genus and species, Cryodrakon boreas. Cryodrakon boreas... more
Swapping pollinators reduces species diversity, study finds  PHYS.ORG · 6 days
niversity of Kansas plant biologists Carolyn Wessinger and Lena Hileman appreciate the sheer beauty of a field of colorful wildflowers as much as the next person. But what really gets their adrenaline pumping is... more
Scientists reveal origin for kinetic skulls in early Cretaceous paraves  PHYS.ORG · 6 days
A team of scientists led by Dr. HU Han from University of New England, Australia and Dr. ZHOU Zhonghe from the Institute of Vertebrate Paleontology and Paleoanthropology (IVPP)... more
Jaws reveal Australia's ancient marsupial panda  PHYS.ORG · 7 days
New research has revealed that Australia's extinct short-faced kangaroos were a marsupial version of the giant panda, with jaws adapted to browsing woody, poor-quality vegetation. more
What the noggin of modern humans' ancestor would have looked like  SCIENCE DAILY · 1 week
Despite having lived about 300,000 years ago, the oldest ancestor of all members of our species had a surprisingly modern skull -- as suggested by a... more
Chicken study reveals that environmental factors, not just chance, could drive species evolution  PHYS.ORG · 1 week
In the version of evolutionary theory most of us are familiar with, randomly occurring variation in traits, caused by mutations in our... more
Numerical simulations probe mechanisms behind sand dune formation  SCIENCE DAILY · 1 week
After noticing how the construction of dams significantly alter the hydrodynamics of natural rivers and the resulting downstream riverbed evolution, researchers decided to apply numerical simulations to help determine what's at play... more
Do animals control earth's oxygen level?  PHYS.ORG · 1 week
No more than 540 million years ago there was a huge boom in the diversity of animals on Earth. The first larger animals evolved in what is today known as the Cambrian explosion. In the time... more
What the cranium of oldest human ancestor would have looked like  PHYS.ORG · 1 week
Despite having lived about 300,000 years ago, the oldest ancestor of all members of Homo sapiens had a surprisingly modern skull, as suggested by a model... more
Effects of environmental changes in the Holocene on megaherbivores  PHYS.ORG · 1 week
An international team involving Hervé Bocherens of the Senckenberg Centre for Human Evolution and Palaeoenvironment at the University of Tübingen has studied the effects of environmental changes in the Holocene... more
Scientists find biology's optimal 'molecular alphabet' may be preordained  SCIENCE DAILY · 1 week
Life uses 20 coded amino acids (CAAs) to construct proteins. This set was likely evolutionarily 'standardized' from smaller sets as organisms discovered how to make and encode them. Scientists modeled... more
Scientists find biology's optimal 'molecular alphabet' may be preordained  PHYS.ORG · 1 week
An international and interdisciplinary team working at the Earth-Life Science Institute (ELSI) at the Tokyo Institute of Technology has modeled the evolution of one of biology's most fundamental sets of... more
Liquid biopsies provide complete picture of genetic alterations linked to cancer drug resistance  NEWS MEDICAL · 1 week
Many patients see their tumors shrink in response to a drug, only to have them come back with a vengeance as they... more
Scientists spot six near-extinct vaquita marinas  PHYS.ORG · 1 week
Scientists said Monday they have spotted six vaquita marinas, one of the most endangered animals on Earth, off the coast of Mexico, reviving hopes for the survival of the world's smallest porpoise. more
Following Neanderthals' footsteps to learn how they lived  PHYS.ORG · 1 week
Like modern humans and primates, Neanderthals—our closest evolutionary cousins—are thought to have lived in groups, but their size and composition have been difficult to infer from archeological and fossil remains. more
Acute periodontal disease bacteria love colon and dirt microbes  SCIENCE DAILY · 1 week
Mythbuster: The idea that bacterial collaborations within microbiomes, like in the mouth, have evolved to be generous and exclusive very much appears to be wrong. In an extensive experiment, lavish... more
Rocks at asteroid impact site record first day of dinosaur extinction  SCIENCE DAILY · 1 week
The research centers on the asteroid impact that wiped out non-avian dinosaurs, with the researchers getting the most detailed look yet of the aftermath that followed... more
Rocks at asteroid impact site record first day of dinosaur extinction  PHYS.ORG · 1 week
When the asteroid that wiped out the dinosaurs slammed into the planet, the impact set wildfires, triggered tsunamis and blasted so much sulfur into the atmosphere... more
Liquid biopsies reveal genetic alterations linked to cancer drug resistance  SCIENCE DAILY · 1 week
New research shows that liquid biopsies taken from blood provide a more complete picture than traditional biopsy of both the genetic diversity of a patient's cancer and how... more
Ages of the Navajo Sandstone  PHYS.ORG · 1 week
The real Jurassic Park was as an ancient landscape home to a vast desert covered mostly in sand dunes as far as the eye could see, where dinosaurs and small mammals roamed southern Utah. The Navajo Sandstone is... more
Ages of the Navajo Sandstone  SCIENCE DAILY · 1 week
The real Jurassic Park was as an ancient landscape home to a vast desert covered mostly in sand dunes as far as the eye could see, where dinosaurs and small mammals roamed southern Utah. The Navajo Sandstone is... more
Researchers unearth 'new' extinction  PHYS.ORG · 1 week
A team of scientists has concluded that earth experienced a previously underestimated severe mass-extinction event, which occurred about 260 million years ago, raising the total of major mass extinctions in the geologic record to six. more
Identity crisis for fossil beetle helps rewrite beetle family tree  SCIENCE DAILY · 1 week
A tiny fossil beetle, about the size of FDR's nose on the US dime, is a totally different species than scientists thought it was, meaning that the beetle... more
Identity crisis for fossil beetle helps rewrite beetle family tree  PHYS.ORG · 1 week
There are more different kinds of beetle than just about any other kind of animal—scientists have described about 5,800 different species of mammals, compared with nearly 400,000 species... more
Researchers unearth 'new' mass-extinction  SCIENCE DAILY · 1 week
A team of scientists has concluded that earth experienced a previously underestimated severe mass-extinction event, which occurred about 260 million years ago. more
Opinion: Earth Has Survived Extinctions Before, It's Humans Who Are Fragile  NPR · 1 week
Earth has experienced cataclysmic life-destroying events before. NPR's Scott Simon reflects on what this means for humans in the midst of climate change. more
Key enzyme found in plants could guide development of medicines and other products  SCIENCE DAILY · 2 weeks
Researchers studying how plants evolved the abilities to make natural chemicals, which they use to adapt to stress, have uncovered how an... more
Pain in the asp: Bird-deterring nets create haven for stinging pests  SCIENCE DAILY · 2 weeks
While collecting data from live oak trees in the world's largest medical center, evolutionary ecologists have discovered huge quantities of one of North America's most venomous... more
Rare deer likely lived 50 years beyond declaration of extinction  SCIENCE DAILY · 2 weeks
Schomburgk's deer (Rucervus schomburgki) was added to the extinction list in 1938. But new evidence, gleaned from antlers obtained in late 1990 or early 1991, shows that it... more
Big Oil investments bet on failure to meet climate goals: report  PHYS.ORG · 2 weeks
Oil and gas projects approved by major fossil fuel companies over the last 20 months threaten both shareholder value and efforts to keep Earth from overheating,... more
Evidence suggests rare deer lived 50 years beyond 'extinction'  PHYS.ORG · 2 weeks
A rare deer species that lived in central Thailand might have come back from the dead—without the help from sci-fi-like genetic engineering. more
The paradox of different house flies with few genetic differences  SCIENCE DAILY · 2 weeks
Evolutionary biologists have published findings on sex determinates of house flies. The work examines the slight difference in genetic makeup of male flies who hail from the north... more
New Duck-Billed Dinosaur Unveiled: Kamuysaurus japonicus  SCI-NEWS.COM · 2 weeks
A new genus and species of hadrosaurid dinosaur (duck-billed) has been identified from bones discovered six years ago in Japan. The newly-identified dinosaur, named... more
Breakdown in coral spawning places species at risk of extinction  SCIENCE DAILY · 2 weeks
Synchronized coral spawning has become erratic, endangering the long-term survival of coral species, researchers say. more
Ecologists find bird-deterring nets create haven for stinging venomous caterpillars  PHYS.ORG · 2 weeks
While collecting data from live oak trees in the world's largest medical center, Rice University evolutionary ecologists have discovered huge quantities of one of North America's most venomous... more
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