Evolution
60 percent of coffee varieties face 'extinction risk'  PHYS.ORG · 11 minutes
Three in five species of wild coffee are at risk of extinction as a deadly mix of climate change, disease and deforestation puts the future of the world's favourite beverage in jeopardy,... more
Robot recreates the walk of a 290-million-year-old creature  PHYS.ORG · 11 minutes
How did the earliest land animals move? Scientists have used a nearly 300-million-year old fossil skeleton and preserved ancient footprints to create a moving robot model of prehistoric life. more
Coralline red algae have existed for 300 million years longer than presumed  SCIENCE DAILY · 46 minutes
Coralline red algae have existed for 130 million years, in other words since the Cretaceous Period, the time of the dinosaurs. At least this... more
An ancient child from East Asia grew teeth like a modern human  SCIENCE-NEWS · 1 hour
Fossilized choppers from an ancient child with a mysterious evolutionary background indicate that hominids evolved a humanlike life span in East Asia by at... more
High extinction risk for wild coffee species and implications for coffee sector sustainability  Science Magazine · 2 hours
Wild coffee species are critical for coffee crop development and, thus, for sustainability of global coffee production. Despite this fact, the extinction... more
A four-legged robot hints at how ancient tetrapods walked  SCIENCE-NEWS · 2 hours
Using fossils, computer simulations and a life-size walking robot, researchers re-created how an early tetrapod may have made tracks. more
Study shows no long-term removal of Neandertal DNA from Europeans  PHYS.ORG · 7 hours
A team of researchers at the Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology has found evidence that suggests there has been no long-term removal of Neandertal DNA from modern... more
Western-led team may unlock rocky secrets of Mars  PHYS.ORG · 8 hours
Humankind may be able to reach further back into the history of its nearest planetary neighbour, unlocking the secrets to the evolution, climate, and habitability of Mars, thanks to the efforts of... more
Avoiding fossil fuel 'lock-in' could limit global temperature rise  PHYS.ORG · 8 hours
Research suggests there would be a 64 percent chance of limiting the increase in global average temperatures to 1.5°C above pre-industrial levels, if fossil fuel infrastructure was phased out immediately. more
Cybersecurity system evolves as it watches and learns from would-be hackers  PHYS.ORG · 9 hours
For hackers, the United States energy grid is a treasure trove of classified information with vast potential for profit and mayhem. To be effective, the power... more
'Junk' science? For some crabs at least, size does matter  PHYS.ORG · 13 hours
Size does matter, at least when it comes to some hermit crabs, who appear to have evolved longer penises so they can stay in their shells to protect... more
MANF identified as a rejuvenating factor in parabiosis  SCIENCE DAILY · 20 hours
Older mice who are surgically joined with young mice in order to share a common bloodstream get stronger and healthier, making parabiosis one of the hottest topics in age research. Researchers now... more
Here's the 1 Way We Can Avoid Climate Catastrophe, Scary Report Says  LIVE SCIENCE · 1 day
How can humans limit catastrophic climate change? We can phase out fossil-fuel emitters — such as coal-burning power plants, jet-fuel-slurping planes and gas-thirsty automobiles... more
Central Texas salamanders, including newly identified species, at risk of extinction  SCIENCE DAILY · 1 day
Biologists have discovered three new species of groundwater salamander in Central Texas, including one living west of Austin that they say is critically endangered. They also... more
History of North African date palm  SCIENCE DAILY · 1 day
Genome analysis reveals that North African date palms are a hybrid between cultivated date palms from the Middle East and a different, wild species of palm that grows on the island of Crete and in small... more
Biology of our ancient ancestor takes shape  PHYS.ORG · 1 day
The recent discovery of a new lineage of microbes has overturned biologists' understanding of the evolution of complex life on Earth. Genomic studies of Asgard archaea revealed that they carry many genes previously thought... more
Fossil deposit is much richer than expected  PHYS.ORG · 1 day
It has long been known that a quarry near the Dutch town of Winterswijk is an Eldorado for fossil lovers. But even connoisseurs will be surprised just how outstanding the site actually is. A... more
Heating buildings leaves a huge carbon footprint, but there's a fix for it  PHYS.ORG · 1 day
As winter weather sets in, the heat kicks on in New York City's approximately one million buildings. Most of these buildings' furnaces... more
New understanding in the evolution of human feet  NEWS MEDICAL · 2 days
Scientists have made a step forward in understanding the evolution of human feet. more
Step forward in understanding human feet  PHYS.ORG · 2 days
Scientists have made a step forward in understanding the evolution of human feet. more
Using genomic data, researchers unlock history of North African date palm  PHYS.ORG · 2 days
Genome analysis reveals that North African date palms are a hybrid between cultivated date palms from the Middle East and a different, wild species of palm... more
Central Texas salamanders, including newly identified species, at risk of extinction  PHYS.ORG · 2 days
Biologists at The University of Texas at Austin have discovered three new species of groundwater salamander in Central Texas, including one living west of Austin that... more
Differences in genes' geographic origin influence mitochondrial function  PHYS.ORG · 2 days
Differences in the geographic origin of genes may affect the function of human mitochondria—energy-generating organelles inside of cells—according to a new study. Mitochondria have their own genome, separate from the nuclear genome... more
New immune system understanding may lead to safer nanomedicines  PHYS.ORG · 2 days
Doctors would like to use all sorts of nanoparticles in the body, for example to construct detailed images of anatomy and disease, and to deliver cancer-fighting drugs deep within tumor... more
Let's prepare now so farming insects as food is environmentally friendly, say scientists  PHYS.ORG · 2 days
As whole-roasted crickets gain traction as a protein-rich snack and restaurants experiment with mealworms on the menu, there's still "an overwhelming lack... more
Fossil deposit is much richer than expected  SCIENCE DAILY · 2 days
Near the Dutch town of Winterswijk is an Eldorado for fossil lovers. A student has now analyzed pieces from museums and private collections for his master's thesis. He found an amazing amount of almost... more
New mathematical model to save endangered species  PHYS.ORG · 2 days
What does the blue whale have in common with the Bengal tiger and the green turtle? They share the risk of extinction and are classified as endangered species. There are multiple reasons for species... more
Plant phytolith and water content influence rate of tooth enamel abrasion in vertebrates  PHYS.ORG · 2 days
Plant phytolith and water content cause differing degrees of tooth enamel abrasion in vertebrates. This is the conclusion reached by an international... more
DNA of wolf declared extinct in wild lives on in Texas pack  PHYS.ORG · 3 days
Researchers say a pack of wild canines found frolicking near the beaches of the Texas Gulf Coast carry a substantial amount of red wolf... more
California sea lions killed to protect migrating fish  PHYS.ORG · 4 days
Authorities in the western US state of Oregon have euthanized four sea lions in the last month as part of a program to protect salmon runs and steelhead trout that are at... more
Plant phytolith and water content influence rate of tooth enamel abrasion in vertebrates  SCIENCE DAILY · 5 days
Plant phytolith and water content cause differing degrees of tooth enamel abrasion in vertebrates. This study has implications for how tooth wear... more
Rise of renewables creating 'new world': report  PHYS.ORG · 5 days
The rapid growth of renewable energy sources and the demise of fossil fuels are causing major changes in global politics, a special commission said in a report Friday. more
Why wasn't the human genome shredded long ago?  PHYS.ORG · 5 days
In the January 7th edition of Communications Biology, researchers at InsideOutBio argue that an unusual form of DNA with a reverse twist may have helped thwart the invasion of the human genome... more
Reconstruction of trilobite ancestral range in the southern hemisphere  SCIENCE DAILY · 6 days
Brazilian researchers used biogeographic analysis to study trilobites -- arthropods that became extinct over 252 million years ago. more
An evolutionary perspective on immunometabolism  Science Magazine · 6 days
Metabolism is at the core of all biological functions. Anabolic metabolism uses building blocks that are either derived from nutrients or synthesized de novo to produce the biological infrastructure, whereas catabolic metabolism generates energy to fuel all biological... more
Problem-solving males become more attractive to female budgerigars  Science Magazine · 6 days
Darwin proposed that mate choice might contribute to the evolution of cognitive abilities. An open question is whether observing the cognitive skills of an individual makes it more attractive as a mate.... more
Bizarre 'bristle-jaw' creatures finally placed on tree of life  PHYS.ORG · 6 days
Chaetognaths, whose name means "bristle-jaw," can be found all over world, swimming in brackish estuaries, tropical seas and above the deep dark ocean floor. Also known as arrow worms, the... more
New strategy may curtail spread of antibiotic resistance  PHYS.ORG · 6 days
Spotless surfaces in hospitals can hide bacteria that rarely cause problems for healthy people but pose a serious threat to people with weakened immune systems. Acinetobacter baumannii causes life-threatening lung and bloodstream... more
Reconstruction of trilobite ancestral range in the southern hemisphere  PHYS.ORG · 6 days
The first appearance of trilobites in the fossil record dates to 521 million years ago in the oceans of the Cambrian Period, when the continents were still inhospitable to most... more
‘Little Foot’ skeleton reveals a brain much like a chimp’s  SCIENCE-NEWS · 6 days
An ancient skeleton dubbed Little Foot points to the piecemeal evolution of various humanlike traits in hominids, two studies suggest. more
A Blue Clue In Medieval Teeth May Bespeak A Woman's Artistry Circa A.D. 1000  NPR · 7 days
Analysis of fossilized dental tartar of a medieval woman buried in a German monastery reveals specks of blue to be... more
A Blue Clue In Medieval Teeth May Bespeak A Woman's Artistry Circa 1,000 A.D.  NPR · 1 week
Analysis of fossilized dental tartar of a medieval woman buried in a German monastery reveals specks of blue to be... more
Little Foot's inner ear sheds light on her movement and behaviour  PHYS.ORG · 1 week
MicroCT scans of the 3.67-million-year-old Australopithecus fossil known as Little Foot shed some light on how she lived and moved. more
T. rex bite 'no match for a finch'  PHYS.ORG · 1 week
Tyrannosaurus rex, renowned for being one of the most fearsome creatures to have ever lived, evolved a bite that was less impressive in relation to its body size than a tiny Galapagos... more
A little squid sheds light on evolution with bacteria  SCIENCE DAILY · 1 week
Researchers have sequenced the genome of a little squid to identify unique evolutionary footprints in symbiotic organs, yielding clues about how organs that house bacteria are especially suited for this... more
Study shows link between antibiotic resistance in the environment and fecal pollution  NEWS MEDICAL · 1 week
Increased levels of antibiotic-resistant bacteria in the environment may have different causes. It could be a consequence of on-site selection from antibiotic residues in... more
Ancient Sea Monster's Head Holds Big Teeth … and Fake Bones  LIVE SCIENCE · 1 week
A new analysis of a nearly 200-million-year-old sea-monster skull has surprised scientists, but not merely because the skull was enormous or because it was exquisitely preserved... more
The first case of a Portuguese beetle living exclusively in groundwater  SCIENCE DAILY · 1 week
A diving beetle demonstrating various adaptations to the life underground, including depigmentation and evolutionary loss of eyes, was discovered in the cave Soprador do Carvalho, Portugal.... more
Antibiotic resistance in the environment linked to fecal pollution  PHYS.ORG · 1 week
Increased levels of antibiotic resistant bacteria in the environment may have different causes. It could be a consequence of on-site selection from antibiotic residues in the environment, hence promoting the... more
Thin layers of sediment point to early arrival of life on land  PHYS.ORG · 1 week
New clues emerging from fossils found in the oldest soils on Earth suggest that multicellular, land-dwelling organisms possibly emerged much earlier than thought. more
Climate change: Effect on sperm could hold key to species extinction  PHYS.ORG · 1 week
Since the 1980s, increasingly frequent and intense heatwaves have contributed to more deaths than any other extreme weather event. The fingerprints of extreme events and climate... more
Scientists identify evolutionary formula for monogamy  NEWS MEDICAL · 1 week
U.S. biologists have conducted a study showing that the evolution of a universal transcriptomic code underlies monogamous behavior in various species of vertebrates. more
Dinosaur-Killing Asteroid Triggered Mile-High Tsunami That Spread Through Earth's Oceans  SPACE.COM · 1 week
When the dinosaur-killing asteroid collided with Earth more than 65 million years ago, it did not go gently into that good night. Rather, it blasted a nearly mile-high... more
Medical scanner helps to unlock the mysteries of a giant prehistoric marine reptile  PHYS.ORG · 1 week
A nearly metre-long skull of a giant fossil marine ichthyosaur found in a farmer's field more than 60 years ago has been... more
The first case of a Portuguese beetle living exclusively in groundwater  PHYS.ORG · 1 week
A diving beetle demonstrating various adaptations to the life underground, including depigmentation and evolutionary loss of eyes, was discovered at the bottom of a clay pound... more
Evolution used same genetic formula to turn animals monogamous  SCIENCE DAILY · 1 week
According to a new study that looked at 10 species of vertebrates, evolution used a kind of universal formula for turning non-monogamous species into monogamous species -- turning up the... more
A little squid sheds light on evolution with bacteria  PHYS.ORG · 1 week
Bacteria, which are vital for the health of all animals, also played a major role in the evolution of animals and their tissues. In an effort to understand just how... more
Fossil of prehistoric deer found in Argentina  PHYS.ORG · 1 week
The well-preserved fossil of a prehistoric deer has been discovered just to the north of Buenos Aires, the La Matanza University revealed on Monday. more
Evolution used same genetic formula to turn animals monogamous  PHYS.ORG · 1 week
Why are some animals committed to their mates and others are not? According to a new study led by researchers at The University of Texas at Austin that looked at... more
New bat-borne virus related to Ebola  SCIENCE DAILY · 1 week
Newly discovered Mengla virus is evolutionarily closely related to Ebola virus and Marburg virus and shares several important functional similarities with them. For example, the genome organization of the Menglà virus is consistent with other filoviruses,... more
Should researchers engineer a spicy tomato?  PHYS.ORG · 1 week
The chili pepper, from an evolutionary perspective, is the tomato's long-lost spitfire cousin. They split off from a common ancestor 19 million years ago but still share some of the same DNA. While the tomato plant... more
3-D scans of bat skulls help natural history museums open up dark corners of their collections  PHYS.ORG · 1 week
Picture a natural history museum. What comes to mind? Childhood memories of dinosaur skeletons and dioramas?... more
Rovibrational quantum state resolution of the C60 fullerene  PHYS.ORG · 1 week
A central objective of chemical and molecular physics is to understand molecules as quantum mechanical systems. The complex internal dynamics of such systems evolve across wide energy and time scales, exhibited by... more
Fermilab scientists lead quest to find elusive fourth kind of neutrino  PHYS.ORG · 1 week
Neutrinos, ghostly fundamental particles that are famously difficult to study, could provide scientists with clues about the evolution of the universe. more
Dinosaur-Killing Asteroid Triggered Mile-High Tsunami That Spread Through Earth's Oceans  LIVE SCIENCE · 1 week
When the dinosaur-killing asteroid collided with Earth more than 65 million years ago, it did not go gently into that good night. Rather, it blasted a nearly mile-high... more
Dino Graveyard: Photos of Dinosaur National Monument  LIVE SCIENCE · 2 weeks
The world's richest quarry of dinosaur fossils is located in the American West, at Dinosaur National Monument. more
Researchers locate the body's largest cell receptor  PHYS.ORG · 2 weeks
A giant toadstool that swallows up vitamins and nutrients in the intestines and kidneys: This is how one receptor that absorbs B12 vitamins in the small intestine looks. For the first time, researchers from... more
Greener hydrogen from water  PHYS.ORG · 2 weeks
The idea of using hydrogen as the basis of a clean sustainable energy source, often termed a hydrogen economy, has been a topic of conversation for decades. Hydrogen fuel, for example, doesn't emit any carbon dioxide and is considered more... more
Fruit flies help to shed light on the evolution of metabolism  PHYS.ORG · 2 weeks
Diet choice of animal species is highly variable. Some species are specialists feeding only on one food source, such as a sugar-rich fruit or protein-rich meat.... more
Strength in weakness: Fragile DNA regions key to vertebrate evolution  PHYS.ORG · 2 weeks
DNA regions susceptible to breakage and loss are genetic hot spots for important evolutionary changes, according to a Stanford study. The findings may lead to new understanding of... more
Research reveals factors at play in genetic incompatibility of different species  NEWS MEDICAL · 2 weeks
Most evolutionary biologists distinguish one species from another based on reproductivity: members of different species either won't or can't mate with one another, or, if they... more
Scientists engineer shortcut for photosynthetic glitch, boost crop growth 40%  SCIENCE DAILY · 2 weeks
Most crops on the planet are plagued by a photosynthetic glitch, and to deal with it, evolved an energy-expensive process called photorespiration that drastically suppresses their yield potential.... more
DNA fragility in the parallel evolution of pelvic reduction in stickleback fish  Science Magazine · 2 weeks
Evolution generates a remarkable breadth of living forms, but many traits evolve repeatedly, by mechanisms that are still poorly understood. A classic example of... more
Scientists engineer shortcut for photosynthetic glitch, boost crop growth by 40 percent  PHYS.ORG · 2 weeks
Plants convert sunlight into energy through photosynthesis; however, most crops on the planet are plagued by a photosynthetic glitch, and to deal with it,... more
What makes two species different?  SCIENCE DAILY · 2 weeks
For most of the 20th century, scientists believed that the reproductive incompatibility between species evolved gradually as a by-product of adapting to different environments. New research has shown there are more factors at play -- specifically the presence... more
Fruit fly study sheds light on the evolution of metabolism  NEWS MEDICAL · 2 weeks
Diet choice of animal species is highly variable. Some are specialists feeding only on one food source, such as a sugar-rich fruit or protein-rich meat. Other species, like... more
What makes two species different?  PHYS.ORG · 2 weeks
Most evolutionary biologists distinguish one species from another based on reproductivity: members of different species either won't or can't mate with one another, or, if they do, the resulting offspring are often sterile, unviable, or suffer some other... more
Fruit flies help to shed light on the evolution of metabolism  SCIENCE DAILY · 2 weeks
Researchers have discovered that the ability to use sugar as food varies strongly between closely related fruit fly species. They have also identified the genetic basis... more
Researchers locate the body's largest cell receptor  SCIENCE DAILY · 2 weeks
A giant toadstool that swallow up vitamins and nutrients in the intestines and kidneys. This is how the receptor, which e.g. absorbs B12 vitamin in the small intestine, looks. For the first time, researchers... more
NeanderthalsExtinctionSentienceDinosaurs
Western-led team may unlock rocky secrets of Mars
PHYS.ORG
A four-legged robot hints at how ancient tetrapods walked
SCIENCE-NEWS
Robot recreates the walk of a 290-million-year-old creature
PHYS.ORG
T. rex bite 'no match for a finch'
PHYS.ORG
Climate change: Effect on sperm could hold key to species extinction
PHYS.ORG
3-D scans of bat skulls help natural history museums open up dark corners of their collections
PHYS.ORG
We discovered more about the honeybee 'wake-up call'—and it could help save them
PHYS.ORG
How much are we learning? Natural selection is science's best critic
PHYS.ORG
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