Evolution
Study shows how AI can improve physicians' diagnostic accuracy  NEWS MEDICAL · 3 hours
As artificial intelligence continues to evolve, diagnosing disease faster and potentially with greater accuracy than physicians, some have suggested that technology may soon replace tasks that physicians currently perform. more
Mammals' unique arms started evolving before the dinosaurs existed  SCIENCE DAILY · 7 hours
One of the things that makes mammals special is our diverse forelimbs -- bat wings, whale flippers, gibbon arms, and cheetah legs have evolved to do different, specialized tasks. Scientists... more
Researchers create hydrogen fuel from seawater  SCIENCE DAILY · 7 hours
Splitting water into hydrogen and oxygen presents an alternative to fossil fuels, but purified water is a precious resource. A team has now developed a way to harness seawater -- Earth's most abundant source -- for... more
Researchers create hydrogen fuel from seawater  nanowerk · 10 hours
Splitting water into hydrogen and oxygen presents an alternative to fossil fuels, but purified water is a precious resource. A team has now developed a way to harness seawater - Earth's most abundant source - for... more
Google research shows how AI can make ophthalmologists more effective  SCIENCE DAILY · 10 hours
As artificial intelligence continues to evolve, diagnosing disease faster and potentially with greater accuracy than physicians, some have suggested that technology may soon replace tasks that physicians currently... more
Giant squid gets makeover before showtime  PHYS.ORG · 13 hours
A little elbow grease, some formaldehyde, and a lot of ingenuity—that's what it took for taxidermists at the Museum of Natural History to prettify a giant squid along with a coelacanth, a rare fish known as... more
Mammals' unique arms started evolving before the dinosaurs existed  PHYS.ORG · 15 hours
Bats fly, whales swim, gibbons swing from tree to tree, horses gallop, and humans swipe on their phones—the different habitats and lifestyles of mammals rely on our unique forelimbs. No... more
Alligator study reveals insight into dinosaur hearing  SCIENCE DAILY · 16 hours
A biologist finds alligators build neural maps of sound the way birds do, suggesting the hearing strategy existed in their common ancestor, the dinosaurs. more
Alligator study reveals insight into dinosaur hearing  PHYS.ORG · 17 hours
To determine where a sound is coming from, animal brains analyze the minute difference in time it takes a sound to reach each ear—a cue known as interaural time difference. What happens to the... more
Rukwa Rift Basin Project names new Cretaceous mammal from East African Rift System  SCIENCE DAILY · 18 hours
Researchers announced a new species of mammal from the Age of Dinosaurs, representing the most complete mammal from the Cretaceous Period of... more
Bright X-ray galactic nuclei  PHYS.ORG · 22 hours
All massive galaxies are believed to host supermassive black holes (SMBH) at their centers that grow by accreting mass from their environment. The current picture also imagines that the black holes grow in size as their host galaxy evolves, perhaps... more
Asteroid Bennu Is Rotating Faster Over Time  ASTRO WATCH · 4 days
In late 2018, the Origins, Spectral Interpretation, Resource Identification, Security-Regolith Explorer (OSIRIS-REx) spacecraft arrived at Bennu, the asteroid it will be studying... more
Machine learning approach sheds light on the biology of liver and kidneys after toxin exposure  NEWS MEDICAL · 4 days
Exposure to potentially harmful chemicals is a reality of life. Our ancestors, faced with naturally occurring toxins, evolved... more
Ocean sink for man-made CO2 measured  PHYS.ORG · 4 days
An international research project led by scientists from ETH Zurich has determined the amount of man-made CO2 emissions taken up by the ocean between 1994 and 2007. Not all of the CO2 generated during the combustion... more
New 3-D map will help solve long-standing cosmic mysteries  PHYS.ORG · 4 days
A new study led by ANU has created a 3D map of the magnetic field in a small wedge of the Milky Way galaxy, paving the way for future discoveries... more
Converting biomass by applying mechanical force  PHYS.ORG · 4 days
One of the greatest global challenges is the efficient use of renewable sources in order to meet the increasing demand for energy and feedstock chemicals in the future. In this context, biomass is a promising alternative... more
A new T. rex exhibit takes a deep dive into the iconic dinosaur  SCIENCE-NEWS · 4 days
“T. rex: The Ultimate Predator,” a new exhibit in New York City, draws on the latest science to provide a fresh look... more
Researchers uncover new clues to surviving extinction  SCIENCE DAILY · 4 days
'Great Dying' extinction survivors appear to have shared many of the same ecological roles as their predecessors, with one catch -- there was a surge in the number of individuals with more modern traits.... more
Machine learning sheds light on the biology of toxin exposure  PHYS.ORG · 5 days
Exposure to potentially harmful chemicals is a reality of life. Our ancestors, faced with naturally occurring toxins, evolved mechanisms to detoxify and expel damaging substances. In the modern... more
Bullying evolves with age and proves difficult to escape from  SCIENCE DAILY · 5 days
An international team conducted a study on bullying roles among peers. Children who are involved in bullying at age 11, may remain involved throughout their entire adolescence. more
What the world's oldest eggs reveal about dinosaur evolution  PHYS.ORG · 5 days
A study of the world's earliest known dinosaur eggs reveals new information about the evolution of dinosaur reproduction. more
Patterns of diet and mobility in the last Neandertals and first modern humans  PHYS.ORG · 5 days
A new international study indicates that Neandertals and early modern humans probably had very similar diets, contradicting the assumption that Neandertals died... more
Researchers uncover new clues to surviving extinction  PHYS.ORG · 5 days
Scientists are peeking into ancient oceans to unravel the complexities of mass extinctions, past and future. A new examination of Earth's largest extinction by scientists at the California Academy of Sciences and the University... more
Minor genetic change creates unattractive female moths  PHYS.ORG · 5 days
Sex pheromones are chemical compounds released by an organism to attract potential mates. For moths in particular these sex pheromones are very important for mate recognition, as they rely completely on scent signal rather... more
The dollars and sense of big batteries on the grid  PHYS.ORG · 6 days
As the mix of energy sources feeding power-hungry homes, businesses and industry comes to incorporate more renewables like wind and solar, society faces a reckoning with where to... more
Desert plants provided by homeowners offer habitat for desert bird species  SCIENCE DAILY · 7 days
A persistent question among urban ecology researchers has been the long-term impact of urbanization on bird species biodiversity. Specifically, they wonder whether the portions of cities... more
Phoenix is losing birds, but desert plants provided by homeowners offer habitat for desert species  PHYS.ORG · 7 days
A persistent question among urban ecology researchers has been the long-term impact of urbanization on bird species biodiversity.... more
Tied in knots: New insights into plasma behavior focus on twists and turns  SCIENCE DAILY · 7 days
Findings from an international team of scientists show that twisted magnetic fields can evolve in only so many ways, with the plasma... more
Sloths: how did two different animals wind up looking so similar?  PHYS.ORG · 7 days
Sloths and guppies appear to have little in common – one is an arboreal mammal living in the slow lane, while the other is a tiny... more
Fossil teeth from Kenya solve ancient monkey mystery  SCIENCE DAILY · 1 week
The teeth of a new fossil monkey, unearthed in the badlands of northwest Kenya, help fill a 6-million-year void in Old World monkey evolution, according to a new study. more
Short birth intervals associated with higher offspring mortality in primates  PHYS.ORG · 1 week
Shorter intervals between primate births are associated with higher mortality rates in offspring, finds a new study of macaque monkeys. The results are consistent with previous research on... more
Fossil teeth from Kenya solve ancient monkey mystery  PHYS.ORG · 1 week
The teeth of a new fossil monkey, unearthed in the badlands of northwest Kenya, help fill a 6-million-year void in Old World monkey evolution, according to a study by U.S. and Kenyan... more
Teenage T. rex was already chomping on prey  SCIENCE DAILY · 1 week
New research indicates that even as a teenager the Tyrannosaurus rex showed signs that it would grow up to be a ferocious predator. Scientists reported evidence that a juvenile T. rex fed... more
Genes that evolve from scratch expand protein diversity  SCIENCE DAILY · 1 week
A new study challenges one of the classic assumptions about how new proteins evolve. The research shows that random, noncoding sections of DNA can quickly evolve to produce new proteins. more
Ancient records prompt rethink of animal evolution timeline  SCIENCE DAILY · 1 week
Scientists are rethinking a major milestone in animal evolution, after gaining fresh insights into how life on Earth diversified millions of years ago. more
Common beetle's gut microbiome benefits forests, holds promise for bioenergy  SCIENCE DAILY · 1 week
New research shows how an insect common to the Eastern U.S., the long-horned passalid beetle, has a hardy digestive tract with microbes to thank for turning its woody... more
Genes that evolve from scratch expand protein diversity  PHYS.ORG · 1 week
One of the most important questions in biology is how rapidly new proteins evolve in organisms. Proteins are the building blocks that carry out the basic functions of life. As the genes... more
New Species of Plant-Eating Dinosaur Discovered in Australia  SCI-NEWS.COM · 1 week
Paleontologists in Australia have found fossil fragments from a new genus and species of ornithopod dinosaur that walked the Earth... more
Common beetle's gut microbiome benefits forests, holds promise for bioenergy  PHYS.ORG · 1 week
Insects are critical contributors to ecosystem functioning, and like most living organisms their co-evolution with microbes has been essential to support these functions. While many insects are infamous... more
Ancient records prompt rethink of animal evolution timeline  PHYS.ORG · 1 week
Scientists are rethinking a major milestone in animal evolution, after gaining fresh insights into how life on Earth diversified millions of years ago. more
Winning the arms race: Analysis reveals key gene for bacterial infection  SCIENCE DAILY · 1 week
Researchers have applied molecular evolutionary analysis to quantify the severity of negative selection pressures on genes encoding the pneumococcal choline-binding proteins (CBPs). They found particularly strong... more
The evolution of grain yield  SCIENCE DAILY · 1 week
A high grain yield is undoubtedly a desirable trait in cereal crops. Floret fertility is a key factor which determines the number of grains per inflorescence of cereals such as bread wheat or barley. Nonetheless, until recently little... more
Analysis reveals key gene for bacterial infection  PHYS.ORG · 1 week
To successfully infect their hosts, bacteria need to evade the host immune system in order to reproduce and spread. Over the course of evolution, hosts—such as humans—develop increasingly sophisticated defenses against bacterial infection, while... more
Virus deletes gene to regain replication  PHYS.ORG · 1 week
One virus' genetic loss can become its evolutionary gain, says a pioneering study from the University of Nebraska-Lincoln. more
New wallaby-sized dinosaur from the ancient Australian-Antarctic rift valley  SCIENCE DAILY · 1 week
A new, wallaby-sized herbivorous dinosaur has been identified from five fossilized upper jaws in 125-million-year-old rocks from the Cretaceous period of Victoria, southeastern Australia. more
New wallaby-sized dinosaur from the ancient Australian-Antarctic rift valley  PHYS.ORG · 1 week
A new, wallaby-sized herbivorous dinosaur has been identified from five fossilized upper jaws in 125 million year old rocks from the Cretaceous period of Victoria, southeastern Australia. more
Feds could restrict Pacific Ocean fishing over endangered orcas, NOAA letter says  PHYS.ORG · 2 weeks
SEATTLE—The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) is taking a fresh look at whether new fishing restrictions are needed to help prevent the extinction... more
Video: Small angle neutron scattering  PHYS.ORG · 2 weeks
SINE2020 and the Institute Laue-Langevin in Grenoble, France have collaborated to produce a motion design video highlighting how small angle neutron scattering (SANS) can be used to track the description, distribution, and evolution of microstructures. more
'Extinct' bee found on the outskirts of Perth  PHYS.ORG · 2 weeks
A native bee species believed to be extinct has been found during a survey of insect pollinators in a remnant of banksia woodland at Pinjar in Perth's northern suburbs. more
Proofs of parallel evolution between cognition, tool development, and social complexity  PHYS.ORG · 2 weeks
Researchers have examined the visual response of 113 individuals when observing prehistoric ceramics belonging to different styles and societies. The ceramics analysed cover 4,000 years (from... more
Proofs of parallel evolution between cognition, tool development, and social complexity  SCIENCE DAILY · 2 weeks
A study has used eye-tracking techniques to analyze the processes of selective attention that determine the way in which we explore and interact with our environment.... more
‘Skeleton Keys’ unlocks the history and mysteries of bones  SCIENCE-NEWS · 2 weeks
From fish to dinosaurs to King Richard III, ‘Skeleton Keys’ surveys the scientific and cultural history of bones. more
Crucial milestone for critically endangered bird  SCIENCE DAILY · 2 weeks
A team led by a conservation biologist has successfully relocated threatened Seychelles paradise flycatchers (Terpsiphone corvina) to a different island to help prevent their extinction. Four females and two males were caught on Denis Island and... more
This alligatorlike fish sucks—at lightning speeds  Science Magazine · 2 weeks
High-speed video could reveal how other fish evolved their feeding motions more
Crucial milestone for critically endangered bird  PHYS.ORG · 2 weeks
A team led by a conservation biologist from the University of Kent has successfully re-located threatened Seychelles paradise flycatchers (Terpsiphone corvina) to a different island to help prevent their extinction. more
Why extinct species seem to be returning from the dead  PHYS.ORG · 2 weeks
Like something out of a zombie movie, species that were once thought extinct seem to be rising from the dead. Between February 21 and March 4 2019, three... more
Insects in decline—on farmland, latecomers lose out  PHYS.ORG · 2 weeks
The pollination services provided by wild bees are indispensable, not only for ecological but also for eminently economic reasons. However, over half of the more than 500 wild bee species found in Germany are... more
Study suggests giant sloth did not make it to Holocene  PHYS.ORG · 2 weeks
A team of researchers from the National University of Central Buenos Aires, Olavarría, Stafford Research and La Brea Tar Pits and Museum, has found evidence that suggests the... more
Getting more mileage from microsatellites  SCIENCE DAILY · 2 weeks
Researchers at the Royal Botanic Gardens, Kew, are using a next-generation sequencing genotyping approach to find insight into the evolutionary history of the carob tree -- an economically important species with a long history in the Mediterranean. They... more
This alligator gar sucks—at lightning speeds  Science Magazine · 2 weeks
High-speed video could reveal how other fish evolved their feeding motions more
New insights into the geographical landscape of prehistoric central Tibet  SCIENCE DAILY · 2 weeks
Scientists have uncovered new evidence, using recently-discovered 25-million-year-old fossilized palm leaves, that Tibet's geography was not as 'high and dry' as previously thought. more
In Images: A New Look at T. Rex and Its Relatives  LIVE SCIENCE · 2 weeks
New reconstructions of this iconic dinosaur and its relatives draw from the latest research. more
In Images: A New Look at T. Rex and Relatives  LIVE SCIENCE · 2 weeks
New reconstructions of this iconic dinosaur and its relatives draw from the latest research. more
Dust affects tooth wear and chewing efficiency in chimpanzees  SCIENCE DAILY · 2 weeks
Periodical dust loads on foods places dietary-physiological stress on the digestive system in chimpanzees. The study implicates that extrinsic abrasive particles carried by dust-laden winds affect tooth wear and evolutionary... more
Dinosaurs Were Unaffected by Climate Change, Flourished before Asteroid Strike, Paleontologists Say  SCI-NEWS.COM · 2 weeks
Paleontologists largely agree that the Chicxulub asteroid impact, possibly coupled with intense volcanic activity in India’s Deccan Traps, wiped out non-avian dinosaurs (all dinosaurs... more
Dinosaurs were thriving before asteroid strike that wiped them out  SCIENCE DAILY · 2 weeks
Dinosaurs were unaffected by long-term climate changes and flourished before their sudden demise by asteroid strike, according to new research. more
Climate-driven evolution in trees alters their ecosystems  SCIENCE DAILY · 2 weeks
A new study explores how climate, evolution, plants, and soils are linked. The research is the first to show how climate-driven evolution in tree populations alters the way trees directly interact with their immediate... more
Some worms recently evolved the ability to regrow a complete head  SCIENCE DAILY · 2 weeks
New study reveals regeneration of amputated body parts is not always an ancient trait and scientists might need to rethink the way they compare animals with... more
New insights into the geographical landscape of prehistoric central Tibet  PHYS.ORG · 2 weeks
A team of scientists from the UK and China have uncovered new evidence, using recently-discovered 25-million-year-old fossilised palm leaves, that Tibet's geography was not as 'high and dry'... more
No high Tibetan Plateau until the Neogene  Science Magazine · 2 weeks
The Late Paleogene surface height and paleoenvironment for the core area of the Qinghai-Tibetan Plateau (QTP) remain critically unresolved. Here, we report the discovery of the youngest well-preserved fossil palm leaves from Tibet. They... more
The birth of a coronal mass ejection  Science Magazine · 2 weeks
The Sun’s atmosphere is frequently disrupted by coronal mass ejections (CMEs), coupled with flares and energetic particles. The coupling is usually attributed to magnetic reconnection at a vertical current sheet connecting the flare and... more
Climate-driven evolution in trees alters their ecosystems  PHYS.ORG · 2 weeks
A new study published in Global Change Biology and coauthored by researchers from UT, explores how climate, evolution, plants, and soils are linked. The research is the first to show how climate-driven evolution in... more
Biologists experimentally trigger adaptive radiation  SCIENCE DAILY · 2 weeks
Using host-specific parasites isolated on individual pigeon 'islands,' the scientists showed that descendants of a single population of feather lice adapted rapidly in response to preening. They found that preening drives rapid and divergent camouflage in feather lice... more
Disrupting wolf movement may be more effective at protecting caribou  PHYS.ORG · 2 weeks
Woodland caribou populations have been dwindling towards local extinction across much of their range and scientists believe that predators, and specifically wolves, are a leading cause of the... more
Scientists find worms that recently evolved the ability to regrow a complete head  PHYS.ORG · 2 weeks
An international group of researchers including biologists from the University of Maryland found that at least four species of marine ribbon worms... more
The evolution of grain yield  PHYS.ORG · 2 weeks
A high grain yield is undoubtedly a desirable trait in cereal crops. Floret fertility is a key factor that determines the number of grains per inflorescence of cereals such as bread, wheat or barley. Nonetheless, until recently, little... more
Earliest animals developed later than assumed  PHYS.ORG · 2 weeks
Sponges belong to our earliest ancestors. However, fossils, molecules and genes disagree on the rise of these early animals. A large international team of researchers around Christian Hallmann and Benjamin Nettersheim from the Max Planck Institute... more
Dinosaur tracks make fresh impression at Valley Forge park  PHYS.ORG · 2 weeks
The national park on the site where George Washington and the struggling Continental Army endured a tough winter during the American Revolution boasts a new feature that's a couple of... more
Dinosaurs were thriving before asteroid strike that wiped them out  PHYS.ORG · 2 weeks
Dinosaurs were unaffected by long-term climate changes and flourished before their sudden demise by asteroid strike. more
China's Hainan province to end fossil fuel car sales in 2030  PHYS.ORG · 2 weeks
China's southern Hainan island will end sales of fossil fuel-only cars in 2030, officials said, becoming the first province to announce a target end date for... more
Galactic wind provides clues to evolution of galaxies  PHYS.ORG · 2 weeks
The Cigar Galaxy (also known as M82) is famous for its extraordinary speed in making new stars, with stars being born 10 times faster than in the Milky Way. Now, data from... more
Researchers uncover new facets of HIV's 'arms race' with human defense system  SCIENCE DAILY · 2 weeks
A new study reveals details about the evolutionary contest between HIV and the human immune system that could one day improve treatment. more
How new species arise in the sea  PHYS.ORG · 2 weeks
For a new species to evolve, two things are essential: a characteristic—such as a colour—unique to one species and a mating preference for this characteristic. For example, individuals from a blue fish species prefer... more
Evolutionary expansion of the human brain is under strong genetic control  NEWS MEDICAL · 2 weeks
An analysis of brain scans from more than 600 children and adolescents reveals correlations between size of brain regions unique to humans and intelligence test scores. more
How megalodon's teeth evolved into the 'ultimate cutting tools'  SCIENCE DAILY · 2 weeks
Megalodon, the largest shark that ever lived, is known only from its gigantic bladelike teeth. But these teeth took millions of years to evolve into their final, iconic form. more
Biodiversity crisis: Technological advances in agriculture are not a sufficient response  PHYS.ORG · 2 weeks
Rapid population and economic growth are destroying biological diversity—especially in the tropics. This was reported by a research team led by the German Centre for Integrative... more
Thirteen mammal extinctions prevented by havens  PHYS.ORG · 2 weeks
A stocktake of Australia's animal havens – conservation areas free of cats and foxes – has found that they have already prevented 13 mammal extinctions. more
Biologists experimentally trigger adaptive radiation  PHYS.ORG · 2 weeks
When naturalist Charles Darwin stepped onto the Galapagos Islands in 1835, he encountered a bird that sparked a revolutionary theory on how new species originate. From island to island, finches had wildly varied beak designs that reflected their... more
Microbes causing cystic fibrosis change rapidly within 2-3 years after first infection  NEWS MEDICAL · 2 weeks
A new study, recently published in Nature Communications, has looked at infections in Danish youth with CF over a period of 10 years. This... more
Alien species are primary cause of recent global extinctions  SCIENCE DAILY · 2 weeks
Alien species are the main driver of recent extinctions in both animals and plants, according to a new study. Scientists found that since 1500, alien species have been solely responsible... more
Genetic factors influence human brain expansion  SCIENCE DAILY · 2 weeks
An analysis of brain scans from more than 600 children and adolescents reveals genetically-mediated associations between the size of evolutionarily novel brain regions and intelligence test scores. Genetic influences on the brain follow the patterns of... more
NeanderthalsExtinctionSentienceDinosaurs
Video: Small angle neutron scattering
PHYS.ORG
This alligator gar sucks—at lightning speeds
Science Magazine
How megalodon's teeth evolved into the 'ultimate cutting tools'
PHYS.ORG
'Micro snails' scraped from sidewalk cracks help unlock details of ancient Earth's biological evolution
PHYS.ORG
Paleontologists identify small fossils as that of oldest frog relative found in North America
PHYS.ORG
World's biggest bee found
SCIENCE DAILY
New species of tiny tyrannosaur foreshadows rise of T. rex
PHYS.ORG
Ancient 'night' marsupial faced four months of winter darkness
PHYS.ORG
Fresh