Evolution
Museum volunteers discover new species of extinct heron at North Florida fossil site  SCIENCE DAILY · 2 days
When the bones of an ancient heron were unearthed at a North Florida fossil site, the find wasn't made by researchers but... more
Gut microbiome diversity can be explained by dietary habits and evolution history  NEWS MEDICAL · 2 days
What determines the composition of microorganisms in the digestive tract of animals? A large study by the Vienna University of Technology and the Karl... more
Ernst Haeckel: Pioneer of modern science  SCIENCE DAILY · 2 days
Evolutionary biologist Ernst Haeckel became the first person to define the term ecology in his work published in 1866, entitled 'General Morphology of Organisms'. Science historians and biologists have now worked out just how close his... more
Fuel subsidies defy green trend amid rising climate alarm  PHYS.ORG · 2 days
Even as warnings of climate catastrophe and calls for greener economies grow ever louder, the world is still spending hundreds of billions of dollars every year to subsidise the fossil... more
Museum volunteers discover new species of extinct heron at North Florida fossil site  PHYS.ORG · 2 days
When the bones of an ancient heron were unearthed at a North Florida fossil site, the find wasn't made by researchers but... more
Study dives deep into saving endangered shark  PHYS.ORG · 2 days
Mackerel sharks are large, fast-swimming apex predators that include Hollywood heavy-hitters like great whites (Jaws), mako (Deep Blue Sea) and the now-extinct Megalodon (The Meg). One of the smallest mackerel sharks is the porbeagle—on... more
A 'high-heeled' dinosaur that walked on its tiptoes  PHYS.ORG · 2 days
A 24-tonne dinosaur may have walked in a 'high-heeled' fashion, according to University of Queensland research. more
Could better tests help reverse the rise of drug-resistant infections?  PHYS.ORG · 3 days
A growing number of infections—such as pneumonia, gonorrhea and tuberculosis—are becoming harder to treat, as bacteria evolve defenses against antibiotics faster than we can develop new drugs to... more
Bloodthirsty bedbugs have feasted on prey for 100 million years  SCIENCE-NEWS · 3 days
Research sheds light on the evolutionary history of the bloodsucking bedbugs. The first species evolved at least as early as the Cretaceous, scientists say. more
Bedbugs evolved more than 100 million years ago  SCIENCE DAILY · 3 days
Bedbugs -- some of the most unwanted human bed-mates -- have been parasitic companions with other species aside from humans for more than 100 million years, walking the earth at the same... more
Antibody responses vs. Ebola keep evolving in survivors, months after recovery  SCIENCE DAILY · 3 days
Antiviral antibodies produced by survivors of Ebola infection continue to evolve and improve after recovery, according to a study of immune responses in four people who... more
Bedbugs evolved more than 100 million years ago—and walked the earth with T. rex  PHYS.ORG · 3 days
Bedbugs—some of the most unwanted human bed-mates—have been parasitic companions with other species aside from humans for more than 100... more
Evolution in the gut  PHYS.ORG · 3 days
Evolution and dietary habits interact and determine the composition of bacteria in the digestive tract. Many microorganisms in the intestine seem to have developed in sync with their host animals over millions of years. more
Evolution in the gut  SCIENCE DAILY · 3 days
Evolution and dietary habits interact and determine the composition of bacteria in the digestive tract. Many microorganisms in the intestine seem to have developed in sync with their host animals over millions of years. more
Newly discovered fossil footprints force paleontologists to rethink ancient desert inhabitants  PHYS.ORG · 3 days
An international team of paleontologists has united to study important fossil footprints recently discovered in a remote location within Grand Canyon National Park, Arizona. A large... more
Texas A&M student identifies unique 5-million-year-old rhino species  PHYS.ORG · 3 days
Rhinoceros don't roam the prairies of Texas today, and some might not even know they once roamed the Great Plains. But one Texas A&M University student knows about rhinos: she's identified unique... more
Scientists unravel how intelligent neural network predicts the functions of proteins  NEWS MEDICAL · 3 days
Intelligent virtual companions like Alexa, Siri, and Google Assistant have long become integrated into our everyday lives. And intelligent computational programs, so-called algorithms, have also evolved... more
Voynich Manuscript Finally Decoded: Mysterious Book is Written in Proto-Romance Language  SCI-NEWS.COM · 4 days
The Voynich manuscript, sometimes described as the ‘world’s most mysterious text,’ uses proto-Romance, a... more
Fossil teeth push the human-Neandertal split back to about 1 million years ago  SCIENCE-NEWS · 4 days
A study of fossilized teeth shifts the age of the last common ancestor between Neandertals and humans. more
Mutualistic interactions reshuffle the effects of climate change on plants across the tree of life  Science Magazine · 4 days
Climatically induced local species extinctions may trigger coextinction cascades, thus driving many more species to extinction than originally... more
ALBA protein complex reads genic R-loops to maintain genome stability in Arabidopsis  Science Magazine · 4 days
The R-loop, composed of a DNA-RNA hybrid and the displaced single-stranded DNA, regulates diverse cellular processes. However, how cellular R-loops are recognized remains poorly... more
Dental evolutionary rates and its implications for the Neanderthal-modern human divergence  Science Magazine · 4 days
The origin of Neanderthal and modern human lineages is a matter of intense debate. DNA analyses have generally indicated that both lineages diverged during the middle... more
Dolphin ancestor's hearing was more like hoofed mammals than today's sea creatures  SCIENCE DAILY · 4 days
Paleontologists are looking into the evolutionary origins of the whistles and squeaks that dolphins and porpoises make -- part of the rare echolocation ability... more
Many species could be even more likely to go extinct than we realise  PHYS.ORG · 4 days
More than a million species are at risk of extinction according to a new report on biodiversity. But even some species that... more
Dolphin ancestor's hearing was more like hoofed mammals than today's sea creatures  PHYS.ORG · 4 days
Vanderbilt University paleontologists are looking into the evolutionary origins of the whistles and squeaks that dolphins and porpoises make—part of the rare echolocation ability... more
Species facing climate change could find help in odd place: Urban environments  PHYS.ORG · 4 days
When it comes to wildlife conservation efforts, urban environments could be far more helpful than we think, according to new research. A study published... more
Tooth fossils fill 6-million-year-old gap in primate evolution  PHYS.ORG · 4 days
Researchers have used fossilized teeth found near Lake Turkana in northwest Kenya to identify a new monkey species—a discovery that helps fill a 6-million-year gap in primate evolution. more
This Bird Evolved into Existence Twice — Thousands of Years Apart  LIVE SCIENCE · 5 days
A type of flightless bird evolved on an atoll or ring-shaped coral reef in the Seychelles — twice. more
First birds: Archaeopteryx gets company  SCIENCE DAILY · 5 days
Researchers describe a hitherto unknown bird from the late Jurassic period. It is the second bird capable of flight, after the famous Archaeopteryx, to be identified from this era. more
99-Million-Year-Old Ammonite Found in Burmese Amber  SCI-NEWS.COM · 5 days
An international team of paleontologists has found a piece of amber containing the beautifully preserved ammonite, several marine and land organisms that lived 99... more
Archaeopteryx gets company  PHYS.ORG · 5 days
Researchers at LMU Munich describe a hitherto unknown bird from the late Jurassic period. It is the second bird capable of flight, after the famous Archaeopteryx, to be identified from this era. more
Brazilian giant's comeback shows preservation and development of Amazon is possible  PHYS.ORG · 5 days
Several meters long and weighing hundreds of kilograms, the Amazon's pirarucu was almost fished to extinction. But the creation of sustainable development reserves in Brazil has... more
Evolutionary backing found in analysis of mammalian vertebrae  SCIENCE DAILY · 6 days
Differences in numbers of vertebrae are most extreme in mammals which do not rely on running and leaping, such as those adapted to suspensory locomotion like apes and sloths, a team of... more
Researchers find evolutionary backing in analysis of mammalian vertebrae  PHYS.ORG · 6 days
Differences in numbers of vertebrae are most extreme in mammals which do not rely on running and leaping, such as those adapted to suspensory locomotion like apes and sloths, a... more
Our History in the Stars  ASTRO WATCH · 7 days
Astronomers map the substance aluminum monoxide (AlO) in a cloud around a distant young star -- Origin Source I. The finding clarifies some important details about... more
Deep-sea fishes’ eye chemistry might let them see colors in near darkness  SCIENCE-NEWS · 1 week
An unexpected abundance of proteins for catching dim light evolved independently in three groups of weird deep-sea fishes. more
Suppressed star formation in the early universe  PHYS.ORG · 1 week
Massive clusters of galaxies, some with more mass than a hundred Milky Way galaxies, have been detected from cosmic epochs as early as about three billion years after the big bang. Their ongoing star... more
The grandmother effect suggests that proximity is a factor in family size  PHYS.ORG · 1 week
The human species is one of the very few, along with orcas and pilot whales, where females cease to be fertile after approximately 45... more
We must rip up our environmental laws to address the extinction crisis  PHYS.ORG · 1 week
Humans are causing the Earth's sixth mass extinction event, with an estimated one million species at risk of extinction. more
Invasive species are Australia's number-one extinction threat  PHYS.ORG · 1 week
This week many people across the world stopped and stared as extreme headlines announced that one eighth of the world's species – more than a million – are threatened with extinction. more
Directed evolution opens door to new antibiotics  PHYS.ORG · 1 week
In the ongoing arms race with humans and their antibiotics on one side, and bacteria with their ability to evolve defenses to antibiotics on the other, humans have enlisted a new ally—other bacteria. more
Matter around a young star helps astronomers explore stellar history  PHYS.ORG · 1 week
Astronomers map the substance aluminum monoxide (AlO) in a cloud around a distant young star—Origin Source I. The finding clarifies some important details about how our solar system,... more
Research reveals surprisingly powerful bite of tiny early tetrapod  SCIENCE DAILY · 1 week
Micro-CT scanning of a tiny snake-like fossil discovered in Scotland has shed new light on the elusive creature, thought to be one of the earliest known tetrapods to develop teeth... more
Temporal patterning of apical progenitors and their daughter neurons in the developing neocortex  Science Magazine · 1 week
During corticogenesis, distinct subtypes of neurons are sequentially born from ventricular zone progenitors. How these cells are molecularly temporally patterned is poorly... more
Colorful solution to a chemical industry bottleneck  PHYS.ORG · 1 week
The nanoscale water channels that nature has evolved to rapidly shuttle water molecules into and out of cells could inspire new materials to clean up chemical and pharmaceutical production. KAUST researchers have tailored the... more
Discovery of the photosensor for yellow-green light-driven photosynthesis in cyanobacteria  SCIENCE DAILY · 1 week
Cyanobacteria, a type of bacteria that performs photosynthesis, utilize a photosensor to maximize their light-harvesting capacity under different light environments. A joint research team found a new photosensor... more
The bird that came back from the dead  SCIENCE DAILY · 1 week
New research has shown that the last surviving flightless species of bird, a type of rail, in the Indian Ocean had previously gone extinct but rose from the dead thanks to a... more
Tiny Jurassic Dinosaur Had Membranous Wings  SCI-NEWS.COM · 1 week
A previously unknown species of bird-like dinosaur with pterosaur-like wings has been discovered by a team of paleontologists working with the Institute of Vertebrate... more
Peering into the past, scientists discover bacteria transformed a viral threat to survive  PHYS.ORG · 1 week
Researchers at Indiana University are reporting a previously unknown way that bacteria can develop new genes to evolve and adapt to threats,... more
Smart drug design to prevent malaria treatment resistance  PHYS.ORG · 1 week
Malaria treatment resistance could be avoided by studying how resistance evolves during drug development, according to a new paper published in Cell Chemical Biology. more
Research reveals surprisingly powerful bite of tiny early tetrapod  PHYS.ORG · 1 week
Micro-CT scanning of a tiny snake-like fossil discovered in Scotland has shed new light on the elusive creature, thought to be one of the earliest known tetrapods to develop teeth... more
The bird that came back from the dead  PHYS.ORG · 1 week
New research has shown that the last surviving flightless species of bird, a type of rail, in the Indian Ocean had previously gone extinct but rose from the dead thanks to a... more
Training AI to win a dogfight  PHYS.ORG · 1 week
Artificial intelligence has defeated chess grandmasters, Go champions, professional poker players, and, now, world-class human experts in the online strategy games Dota 2 and StarCraft II. No AI currently exists, however, that can outduel a human... more
Evolution of magnetic field in the star-forming complex G9.62+0.19 revealed by ALMA  PHYS.ORG · 1 week
Using the Atacama Large Millimeter Array (ALMA), European astronomers have investigated the magnetic field of the high-mass star-forming region known as G9.62+0.19. Results of... more
Genome of the endangered pygmy hog reveals interbreeding with several pig species  PHYS.ORG · 1 week
The little pygmy hog turns out to be a big piece in resolving the complex evolutionary puzzle of wild boar speciation. Researchers from Wageningen... more
New Jurassic non-avian theropod dinosaur sheds light on origin of flight in Dinosauria  PHYS.ORG · 1 week
A new Jurassic non-avian theropod dinosaur from 163 million-year-old fossil deposits in northeastern China provides new information regarding the incredible richness of... more
Statistical study finds it unlikely South African fossil species is ancestral to humans  SCIENCE DAILY · 2 weeks
Paleontologists finds that it is unlikely that a two-million-year-old, apelike fossil from South Africa is a direct ancestor of Homo, the genus... more
Genetic architecture and sex-specific selection govern modular, male-biased evolution of doublesex  Science Magazine · 2 weeks
doublesex regulates early embryonic sex differentiation in holometabolous insects, along with the development of species-, sex-, and morph-specific adaptations during pupal stages. How does a highly... more
Temporal evidence shows Australopithecus sediba is unlikely to be the ancestor of Homo  Science Magazine · 2 weeks
Understanding the emergence of the genus Homo is a pressing problem in the study of human origins. Australopithecus sediba has recently been... more
Evolutionary parallelisms of pectoral and pelvic network-anatomy from fins to limbs  Science Magazine · 2 weeks
Lobe-fins transformed into limbs during the Devonian period, facilitating the water-to-land transition in tetrapods. We traced the evolution of well-articulated skeletons across the fins-to-limbs transition, using... more
Statistical study finds it unlikely South African fossil species is ancestral to humans  PHYS.ORG · 2 weeks
Statistical analysis of fossil data shows that it is unlikely that Australopithecus sediba, a nearly two-million-year-old, apelike fossil from South Africa, is... more
Bat-winged dinosaur was intriguing detour in evolution of flight  REUTERS · 2 weeks
A fossil unearthed in northeastern China of a feathered dinosaur a bit bigger than a blue jay that... more
New batlike dinosaur was early experiment in flight  Science Magazine · 2 weeks
Find suggests many dinosaur species may have taken to the skies in unexpected ways during the Jurassic period more
Threatened sturgeon learns for the fitness  PHYS.ORG · 2 weeks
An international team led by IGB is providing one of the first proofs of the complex learning behaviour of fish in a recent study. The Atlantic sturgeon is considered extinct in Germany. The IGB is coordinating... more
Nonhuman life should be central to sustainability problem-solving  PHYS.ORG · 2 weeks
A landmark new United Nations report warns that the rate of species extinctions is accelerating, and that upwards of one million species are gravely at risk. more
1 million species are under threat. Here are 5 ways we speed up extinctions  SCIENCE-NEWS · 2 weeks
One million of the world’s plant and animal species are now under threat of extinction, a new report finds. more
A tiny mystery dinosaur from New Mexico is officially T. rex’s cousin  SCIENCE-NEWS · 2 weeks
A newly identified dinosaur species called Suskityrannus hazelae fills a gap in tyrannosaur lineage. more
The evolution of skyrmions in multilayers and their topological Hall signature  SCIENCE DAILY · 2 weeks
The topological Hall effect (THE) is the Hall response to an emergent magnetic field, a manifestation of the skyrmion Berry-phase. As the magnitude of THE in... more
Threatened sturgeon learns for the fitness  SCIENCE DAILY · 2 weeks
An international team is providing one of the first proofs of the complex learning behavior of fish in a recent study. The Atlantic sturgeon is thought to be locally extinct in Germany. Scientists are working toward... more
Markets missing fossil fuel exposure to climate risk: analysis  PHYS.ORG · 2 weeks
Investors are overlooking the long-term risks climate change poses to oil and gas infrastructure firms, which face tens of billion of dollars worth of stranded assets as the world transitions... more
Study explores genetics behind evolution of flightless birds  PHYS.ORG · 2 weeks
Since Darwin's era, scientists have wondered how flightless birds like emus, ostriches, kiwis, cassowaries, and others are related, and for decades the assumption was that they must all share a common ancestor... more
Cannibalism was profitable for Homo antecessor  PHYS.ORG · 2 weeks
Jesús Rodríguez, Ana Mateos and Guillermo Zorrilla, scientists at the Centro Nacional de Investigación sobre la Evolución Humana (CENIEH), have just published a study in the Journal of Human Evolution in which they analyze the cannibalistic... more
The fossilization process of dinosaur remains  PHYS.ORG · 2 weeks
A study conducted between the UPV/EHU-University of the Basque Country and the University of Zaragoza has conducted an in-depth analysis of the dinosaur fossils at La Cantalera-1, one of the Iberian sites belonging to the Lower... more
Predicting early spring budburst with genetics against a climate change backdrop  PHYS.ORG · 2 weeks
Although climate skeptics might find it hard to believe with this year's endless snow and freezing temperatures, climate change is making warm, sunny early springs increasingly... more
Small T. rex Relative Found in New Mexico: Suskityrannus hazelae  SCI-NEWS.COM · 2 weeks
A new species of predatory tyrannosauroid dinosaur that lived about 92 million years ago (Cretaceous period)... more
Banning offshore oil and gas drilling  PHYS.ORG · 2 weeks
Last week, New York's Governor Andrew Cuomo signed a bill passed in February that banned oil and gas drilling off New York's coastline. The state's action was in part a response to the Trump Administration's plan... more
News Brief: U.S.-China Trade Talks, Humans Accelerate Species' Extinction  NPR · 2 weeks
The White House is fighting China in trade talks, but a new report found top advisers battled over whether to impose tariffs on Chinese imports. The U.N. warns which species... more
News Brief: U.S. China Trade Talks, Humans Excelerate Species' Extinction  NPR · 2 weeks
The White House is fighting China in trade talks, but a new report found top advisers battled over whether to impose tariffs on Chinese imports. The U.N. warns... more
New 3-foot-tall relative of Tyrannosaurus rex  SCIENCE DAILY · 2 weeks
'Suskityrannus gives us a glimpse into the evolution of tyrannosaurs just before they take over the planet,' said Sterling Nesbit. more
Radical desalination approach may disrupt the water industry  PHYS.ORG · 2 weeks
Hypersaline brines—water that contains high concentrations of dissolved salts and whose saline levels are higher than ocean water—are a growing environmental concern around the world. Very challenging and costly to treat, they... more
Failure to account for genetic variation can result in overestimating extinction risk  PHYS.ORG · 2 weeks
New research led by the University of Southampton has shown that the threat of range losses for some species as a result of climate... more
Photos: Tiny Tyrannosaur Dinosaur Was About As Big As T. Rex's Skull  LIVE SCIENCE · 2 weeks
This 92-million-year-old tyrannosaur was so small, it was only slightly larger than the skull of its mighty relative, Tyrannosaurus rex. more
Newfound 'Mini T. Rex' Was a Tiny Terror at Just 3 Feet Tall  LIVE SCIENCE · 2 weeks
A previously unknown tyrannosaur terrorized prey about 92 million years ago, but unlike its relative — the mighty Tyrannosaurus rex — this... more
Oxygen linked with the boom and bust of early animal evolution  SCIENCE DAILY · 2 weeks
Extreme fluctuations in atmospheric oxygen levels corresponded with evolutionary surges and extinctions in animal biodiversity during the Cambrian explosion, finds a new study. more
1 Million Animal And Plant Species Are At Risk Of Extinction, U.N. Report Says  NPR · 2 weeks
"Protecting biodiversity amounts to protecting humanity," says UNESCO Director-General Audrey Azoulay, who warns that species are being lost at an... more
NeanderthalsExtinctionSentienceDinosaurs
Peering into the past, scientists discover bacteria transformed a viral threat to survive
PHYS.ORG
Radical desalination approach may disrupt the water industry
PHYS.ORG
Dealing with the absurdity of human existence in the face of converging catastrophes
PHYS.ORG
Scientists explore the evolution of animal homosexuality
PHYS.ORG
A jawbone shows Denisovans lived on the Tibetan Plateau long before humans
SCIENCE-NEWS
Using DNA templates to harness the sun's energy
PHYS.ORG
Chemical engineers replicate feed, fight and flight responses in catalytic chemical reactions
PHYS.ORG
A Neanderthal tooth discovered in Serbia reveals human migration history
PHYS.ORG
To save life on Earth, here's the $100 billion-a-year solution
PHYS.ORG
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