Evolution
Striking variation in mechanisms that drive sex selection in frogs  SCIENCE DAILY · 9 hours
Researchers have discovered striking variation in the underlying genetic machinery that orchestrates sexual differentiation in frogs, demonstrating that evolution of this crucial biological system has moved at a... more
Researchers discover remarkable variation in genetic mechanisms that drive sexual differentiation of frogs  PHYS.ORG · 10 hours
Researchers from McMaster University have discovered striking variation in the underlying genetic machinery that orchestrates sexual differentiation in frogs, demonstrating that evolution... more
Exoplanet axis study boosts hopes of complex life, just not next door  nanowerk · 10 hours
Astrophysicists modeled a theoretical twin of Earth into other star systems called binary systems because they have two stars. They concluded that 87% of... more
New finding on origin of avian predentary in Mesozoic birds  PHYS.ORG · 11 hours
The predentary bone is one of the most enigmatic skeletal elements in avian evolution. Located at the tip of the lower jaw, this bone is absent in more... more
Researchers find secret of beetle success: Stolen genes  PHYS.ORG · 11 hours
An international team of researchers has found what appears to be one of the secrets to evolutionary success for beetles—genes stolen from bacteria and fungi. In their paper published in Proceedings of... more
Four ways to curb light pollution, save bugs  SCIENCE DAILY · 12 hours
Artificial light at night negatively impacts thousands of species: beetles, moths, wasps and other insects that have evolved to use light levels as cues for courtship, foraging and navigation. Scientists reviewed 229... more
Coming to a head: How vertebrates became predators by tweaking the neural crest  PHYS.ORG · 12 hours
Lamprey are blood-sucking vampire-like fish that attach to and eventually kill game fish, making them the bane of many a fisherman's existence.... more
UNT scientist helps advance archaeology millions of years  PHYS.ORG · 17 hours
Reid Ferring, a professor in the University of North Texas Department of Geography and the Environment, is part of an international team of scientists who have developed a breakthrough method of identifying... more
Four ways to curb light pollution, save bugs  PHYS.ORG · 1 day
Artificial light at night negatively impacts thousands of species: beetles, moths, wasps and other insects that have evolved to use light levels as cues for courtship, foraging and navigation. more
Switching to renewable energy could save thousands of lives in Africa  SCIENCE DAILY · 1 day
New research finds that if Africa chooses a future powered by fossil fuels, nearly 50,000 people could die prematurely each year from fossil fuel emissions by... more
Should scientists change the way they view (and study) same sex behavior in animals?  PHYS.ORG · 1 day
Over the years, scientists have recorded same-sex sexual behavior in more than 1,500 animal species, from snow geese to common... more
Switching to renewable energy could save thousands of lives in Africa  PHYS.ORG · 1 day
With economies and populations surging, an industrial revolution is inevitable on the African continent. The question is, what's going to power it? With renewable energy cheaper... more
Paleontologists Unearth Another Giant Penguin in New Zealand  SCI-NEWS.COM · 1 day
Paleontologists in New Zealand have uncovered a nearly complete skeleton of a giant-sized penguin that swam the oceans about 27... more
A genetic tug-of-war between the sexes begets variation  PHYS.ORG · 1 day
In species with sexual reproduction, no two individuals are alike, and scientists have long struggled to understand why there is so much genetic variation. In a new study published in Nature Ecology... more
Saving 'half Earth' for nature would affect over a billion people  PHYS.ORG · 1 day
As the extinction crisis escalates, and protest movements grow, some are calling for hugely ambitious conservation targets. Among the most prominent is sparing 50% of the... more
Are hyoliths Palaeozoic lophophorates?  PHYS.ORG · 1 day
Hyoliths are extinct invertebrates with calcareous shells that were common constituents of Cambrian fauna and formed a minor component of benthic faunas throughout the Palaeozoic until their demise in the end-Permian mass extinction. The biological affinity of hyoliths has long... more
Researchers in Japan uncover fossil of bird from Early Cretaceous  PHYS.ORG · 1 day
A combined team of researchers from Japan and China has announced the finding and study of the fossilized remains of a bird from the Early Cretaceous. In their... more
Fossil dig leads to unexpected discovery of 91-million-year-old shark new to science  PHYS.ORG · 1 day
A 91-million-year-old fossil shark newly named Cretodus houghtonorum discovered in Kansas joins a list of large dinosaur-era animals. Preserved in sediments deposited in an... more
The little duck that could: Study finds endangered Hawaiian duck endures  PHYS.ORG · 2 days
The endangered Hawaiian duck, or koloa, the only endemic duck remaining on the main Hawaiian Islands, is threatened with genetic extinction due to interbreeding with feral... more
Water could modulate the activity and selectivity of carbon dioxide reduction  PHYS.ORG · 4 days
As an alternative to the depletion of fossil resources, the reduction of CO2 emitted from fossil fuel combustion into valuable chemicals and fuel has drawn increasing... more
Atomically dispersed Ni is coke-resistant for dry reforming of methane  PHYS.ORG · 4 days
Dry reforming of methane (DRM) is the process of converting methane (CH4) and carbon dioxide (CO2) into synthesis gas (syngas). Since CO2 and CH4 are the two most... more
Lichens are way younger than scientists thought  SCIENCE DAILY · 4 days
Lichens -- a combo of fungus and algae -- can grow on bare rocks, so scientists thought that lichens were some of the first organisms to make their way onto land from the water,... more
New Dinosaur-Era Bird Discovered in Japan: Fukuipteryx prima  SCI-NEWS.COM · 5 days
A new genus and species of non-ornithothoracine bird has been identified from bones collected in Japan. The ancient bird lived... more
Scarier than fiction: climate worry driving 'cli-fi' boom  PHYS.ORG · 5 days
Imagine a world where storms inundate coastal megacities, entire species become extinct in the blink of an eye, and conflicts are fought over dwindling natural resources. more
EU bank to stop funding fossil fuels in 'landmark decision'  PHYS.ORG · 5 days
The European Union's investment arm said Thursday it will stop funding fossil fuel projects from 2022 as part of a new strategy aimed at fighting climate change, in... more
Intermediate bosonic metallic state in the superconductor-insulator transition  Science Magazine · 5 days
Whether a metallic ground state exists in a two-dimensional system beyond Anderson localization remains an unresolved question. Here, we study how quantum phase coherence evolves across superconductor-metal-insulator transitions via magneto-conductance quantum oscillations... more
Response to Comment on "Eocene Fagaceae from Patagonia and Gondwanan legacy in Asian rainforests"  Science Magazine · 5 days
Denk et al. agree that we reported the first fossil Fagaceae from the Southern Hemisphere. We appreciate their general enthusiasm... more
Cellular quality control by the ubiquitin-proteasome system and autophagy  Science Magazine · 5 days
To achieve homeostasis, cells evolved dynamic and self-regulating quality control processes to adapt to new environmental conditions and to prevent prolonged damage. We discuss the importance of two major quality... more
Comment on "Eocene Fagaceae from Patagonia and Gondwanan legacy in Asian rainforests"  Science Magazine · 5 days
Wilf et al. (Research Articles, 7 June 2019, eaaw5139) claim that Castanopsis evolved in the Southern Hemisphere from where it spread to its modern... more
Butterflies take different paths to arrive at same color pattern  SCIENCE DAILY · 5 days
An international team of scientists working with Heliconius butterflies in Panama was faced with a mystery: how do pairs of unrelated butterflies from Peru to Costa Rica evolve... more
Evolution can reconfigure gene networks to deal with environmental change  SCIENCE DAILY · 5 days
Scientists have unraveled the genetic mechanisms behind tiny waterfleas' ability to adapt to increased levels of phosphorus pollution in lakes. more
Dinosaur-Era Bird Preserved in 3D Could Rewrite History of Flight  LIVE SCIENCE · 5 days
A previously unknown species of primitive bird has a tail feature associated with flight in modern birds. more
NASA's Mars 2020 will hunt for microscopic fossils  SCIENCE DAILY · 5 days
Scientists with NASA's Mars 2020 rover have discovered what may be one of the best places to look for signs of ancient life in Jezero Crater, where the rover will land on... more
Is evolution predictable?  PHYS.ORG · 5 days
An international team of scientists working with Heliconius butterflies at the Smithsonian Tropical Research Institute (STRI) in Panama was faced with a mystery: How do pairs of unrelated butterflies from Peru to Costa Rica evolve nearly the same wing-color patterns... more
Is your cat in pain? Its facial expression could hold a clue  PHYS.ORG · 5 days
They say that eyes are windows to the soul. Indeed, research suggests this might also be true for our four-legged friends. Since the days... more
Gigantopithecus is Related to Modern-Day Orangutans, New Study Shows  SCI-NEWS.COM · 5 days
Orangutans (genus Pongo) are the closest living relatives of Gigantopithecus blacki, the biggest primate that ever walked the... more
Turning waste heat into hydrogen fuel  nanowerk · 5 days
Hydrogen as an energy carrier can help us move away from fossil fuels, but only if it is created efficiently. One way to improve efficiency is to use waste heat that's left over from other industrial... more
New Species of Herbivorous Dinosaur Identified in Canada  SCI-NEWS.COM · 6 days
Paleontologists in Canada have found the fossil fragments from a new species of leptoceratopsid dinosaur that walked the Earth during the... more
Climate change poses 'lifelong' child health risk  PHYS.ORG · 6 days
Climate change will damage the health of an entire generation unless there are immediate cuts to fossil fuel emissions, from a rise in deadly infectious diseases to surging malnutrition, experts warned Thursday. more
Extinct giant ape directly linked to the living orangutan  SCIENCE DAILY · 6 days
Researchers have succeeded in reconstructing the evolutionary relationship between a two million year old giant primate and the living orangutan. It is the first time genetic material this old has... more
Evolution can reconfigure gene networks to deal with environmental change  PHYS.ORG · 6 days
Scientists at the University of Birmingham have unravelled the genetic mechanisms behind tiny waterfleas' ability to adapt to increased levels of phosphorus pollution in lakes. more
Predicting evolution: Not just 'survival of the fittest'  SCIENCE DAILY · 6 days
A new method of 're-barcoding' DNA allows scientists to track rapid evolution in yeast. The approach has implications for the prediction of dominant viral strains. more
New artificial intelligence system automatically evolves to evade internet censorship  SCIENCE DAILY · 6 days
Researchers developed a tool called Geneva (short for Genetic Evasion), which automatically learns to circumvent censorship. Tested in China, India and Kazakhstan, Geneva found dozens of ways to... more
Closest Living Relative of Extinct 'Bigfoot' Found  LIVE SCIENCE · 6 days
Gigantopithecus, an enormous extinct ape that lived in Asia millions of years ago, was a close relative of the modern orangutan. more
Closest Relative of Extinct 'Bigfoot' Found  LIVE SCIENCE · 6 days
Gigantopithecus, an enormous extinct ape that lived in Asia millions of years ago, was a close relative of the modern orangutan. more
Evolutionarily conserved regulation of sleep by epidermal growth factor receptor signaling  Science Magazine · 6 days
The genetic bases for most human sleep disorders and for variation in human sleep quantity and quality are largely unknown. Using the zebrafish, a diurnal vertebrate,... more
Paleontologists Find Fossilized Feathers of Cretaceous Polar Dinosaurs and Birds  SCI-NEWS.COM · 6 days
Paleontologists have discovered the fossilized feathers of dinosaurs and birds that lived 118 million years ago... more
China's huge mysterious extinct ape 'Giganto' was an orangutan cousin  REUTERS · 6 days
Genetic material extracted from a 1.9 million-year-old fossil tooth from southern China shows that the world's... more
Something old, something new in the ocean's blue  PHYS.ORG · 6 days
Charles Darwin suspected something in the "clear blue water" of the ocean that was even smaller than the protozoa he could see under the microscope. "Today we know that every liter of... more
Extinct giant ape directly linked to the living orangutan  PHYS.ORG · 6 days
By using ancient protein sequencing, researchers have retrieved genetic information from a 1.9 million year old extinct, giant primate that used to live in a subtropical area in southern China.... more
Spot the difference: Two identical-looking bird species with very different genes  SCIENCE DAILY · 6 days
While reports of species going extinct are sadly becoming common, an international team of scientists has identified a new species of bird living on the Southern... more
Explosion in Tianjin Port enhanced atmospheric nitrogen deposition over the Bohai Sea  PHYS.ORG · 6 days
Total production and the scale of industrial enterprises in China have expanded greatly since late 1970s. As such, long-term accumulated environmental risks have evolved... more
Bats don't rely on gut bacteria the way humans do  SCIENCE DAILY · 6 days
Just about all mammals, including humans, rely on a community of helpful bacteria living in our guts to help us digest food and fight off diseases. We've evolved... more
Climate impact of hydropower varies widely  SCIENCE DAILY · 6 days
Hydropower is broadly considered to be much more environmentally friendly than electricity generated from fossil fuels, and in many cases this is true. However, a new study reveals that the climate impact of hydropower facilities varies... more
Oldest carnivorous dinosaur fossil unearthed in Brazil  PHYS.ORG · 6 days
A team of researchers from Universidade Federal de Santa Maria and Universidade de São Paulo, both in Brazil, has found and identified the oldest carnivorous dinosaur fossil to date. In their paper published in... more
What is a 'mass extinction' and are we in one now?  PHYS.ORG · 6 days
For more than 3.5 billion years, living organisms have thrived, multiplied and diversified to occupy every ecosystem on Earth. The flip side to this explosion of... more
Scientists find two identical-looking bird species have very different genes  PHYS.ORG · 7 days
While reports of species going extinct are sadly becoming common, an international team of scientists has identified a new species of bird living on the Southern coast of... more
NASA's Mars 2020 will hunt for microscopic fossils  PHYS.ORG · 7 days
Scientists with NASA's Mars 2020 rover have discovered what may be one of the best places to look for signs of ancient life in Jezero Crater, where the rover will land on... more
Climate impact of hydropower varies widely  PHYS.ORG · 7 days
Hydropower is broadly considered to be much more environmentally friendly than electricity generated from fossil fuels, and in many cases this is true. However, a new study reveals that the climate impact of hydropower facilities varies... more
Deep neural networks speed up weather and climate models  PHYS.ORG · 7 days
When you check the weather forecast in the morning, the results you see are more than likely determined by the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model, a comprehensive model that... more
Deep neural networks speed up weather and climate models  SCIENCE DAILY · 1 week
A team of environmental and computation scientists is using deep neural networks, a type of machine learning, to replace the parameterizations of certain physical schemes in the Weather Research and... more
Songbirds sing species-specific songs  SCIENCE DAILY · 1 week
The generation of species-specific singing in songbirds is associated with species-specific patterns of gene activity in brain regions called song nuclei, according to a new study. According to the authors, the findings could be a promising step toward a better... more
Songbirds sing species-specific songs  PHYS.ORG · 1 week
The generation of species-specific singing in songbirds is associated with species-specific patterns of gene activity in brain regions called song nuclei, according to a study published November 12 in the open-access journal PLOS Biology by Kazuhiro Wada of Hokkaido University... more
Whale shark hot spot offers new conservation insights  PHYS.ORG · 1 week
According to the International Union for Conservation of Nature (IUCN), whale sharks are considered endangered, which means the species has suffered a population decline of more than 50% in the past three... more
New collection showcases cutting-edge techniques in insect morphology and systematics  PHYS.ORG · 1 week
While the field of morphology—the study of the form and function of organisms—is centuries old, the last two decades have brought incredible leaps forward through the emergence of... more
Bats don't rely on gut bacteria the way humans do  PHYS.ORG · 1 week
Right now, there are trillions of bacteria living in your gut, making up about one percent of your body weight. They're supposed to be there—we need them to... more
New research explains how HIV avoids getting ZAPped  SCIENCE DAILY · 1 week
Humans have evolved dynamic defense mechanisms against the viruses that seek to infect our bodies -- proteins that specialize in identifying, capturing and destroying the genetic material that viruses try to sneak... more
First evidence of feathered polar dinosaurs found in Australia  SCIENCE DAILY · 1 week
A cache of 118 million-year-old fossilized dinosaur and bird feathers has been recovered from an ancient lake deposit that once lay beyond the southern polar circle. more
Applying biodiversity conservation research in practice  SCIENCE DAILY · 1 week
One million species are threatened with extinction, many of them already in the coming decades. This unprecedented loss of biodiversity threatens valuable ecosystems and human well-being. But what is holding us back from putting conservation research... more
Applying biodiversity conservation research in practice  PHYS.ORG · 1 week
One million species are threatened with extinction, many of them already in the coming decades. This unprecedented loss of biodiversity threatens valuable ecosystems and human well-being. But what is holding us back from putting conservation research... more
Putting a conservation finger on the internet's pulse  PHYS.ORG · 1 week
Scientists from the University of Helsinki have figured out how to mine people's online reactions to endangered animals and plants so that they can reduce the chance of pushing species toward extinction. more
First evidence of feathered polar dinosaurs found in Australia  PHYS.ORG · 1 week
A cache of 118 million-year-old fossilized dinosaur and bird feathers has been recovered from an ancient lake deposit that once lay beyond the southern polar circle. more
Humans' ability to read dog facial expressions is learned, not innate  PHYS.ORG · 1 week
In a recent study published in Scientific Reports, a team of researchers from Germany and the United Kingdom assessed how experience with dogs affects humans' ability... more
New catalyst efficiently produces hydrogen from seawater  SCIENCE DAILY · 1 week
Seawater is one of the most abundant resources on earth, offering promise both as a source of hydrogen and of drinking water in arid climates. Now researchers have reported a significant breakthrough with a... more
New fossil pushes back physical evidence of insect pollination to 99 million years ago  SCIENCE DAILY · 1 week
Researchers have pushed back the first-known physical evidence of insect flower pollination to 99 million years ago, during the mid-Cretaceous... more
New fossil pushes back physical evidence of insect pollination to 99 million years ago  PHYS.ORG · 1 week
A new study co-led by researchers in the U.S. and China has pushed back the first-known physical evidence of insect... more
New research explains how HIV avoids getting ZAPped  PHYS.ORG · 1 week
Humans have evolved dynamic defense mechanisms against the viruses that seek to infect our bodies—proteins that specialize in identifying, capturing and destroying the genetic material that viruses try to sneak into our... more
Evolutionary diversity is associated with Amazon forest productivity  SCIENCE DAILY · 1 week
An international team of researchers have revealed for the first time that Amazon forests with the greatest evolutionary diversity are the most productive. more
Gimme shelter: Seven new leech species call freshwater mussels home  SCIENCE DAILY · 1 week
The frequent presence of leeches with a hidden lifestyle in the mantle cavity of freshwater mussels has been recorded since the second half of the 19th century. Yet... more
Vietnam deer rediscovered after nearly 30 years  PHYS.ORG · 1 week
A very rare species of small, deer-like animal thought to be on the verge of extinction has been spotted in the northwestern jungle of Vietnam for the first time in nearly 30 years. more
Antarctica's first zero-emission research station shows that sustainable living is possible anywhere  PHYS.ORG · 1 week
As a scientist investigating climate change, I'm embarrassed by the high carbon footprint I have when I travel to, and work in, Antarctica. Researchers... more
Evolutionary diversity is associated with Amazon forest productivity  PHYS.ORG · 1 week
An international team of researchers led by the University of Leeds have revealed for the first time that Amazon forests with the greatest evolutionary diversity are the most productive. more
What's the story, morning glory? Taxonomy, evolution and sweet potatoes  PHYS.ORG · 1 week
This indicates that the storage root was an already-existing trait that predisposed the plant for cultivation and not solely the result of human domestication, as previously thought. This... more
Humans' ability to read dogs' facial expressions is learned, not innate  SCIENCE DAILY · 1 week
Researchers assessed how experience with dogs affects humans' ability to recognize dog emotions. Participants who grew up in a cultural context with a dog-friendly attitude were... more
The mysterious 'Tully Monster' fossil just got more mysterious  PHYS.ORG · 1 week
Every now and again, scientists discover fossils that are so bizarre they defy classification, their body plans unlike any other living animals or plants. Tullimonstrum (also known as the Tully... more
Net zero emissions: What's in a date?  PHYS.ORG · 1 week
Arguably the principal environmental burden facing inhabitants of Planet Earth is the prospect of "global warming" (or "global heating" as recently suggested as a more appropriate term by a senior UK Met Office scientist)... more
Paleontologists Find 170-Million-Year-Old Giant Pliosaur Fossil  SCI-NEWS.COM · 1 week
Paleontologists in Switzerland have unearthed an exceptionally rare fossil jaw of an ancient creature known as a pliosaur. Pliosaurs were a type of short-necked... more
Galactic Fountains and Carousels: Order Emerging from Chaos  ASTRO WATCH · 1 week
Scientists from Germany and the United States have unveiled the results of a newly-completed, state of the art simulation of... more
Gimme shelter: Seven new leech species call freshwater mussels home  PHYS.ORG · 1 week
The frequent presence of leeches with a hidden lifestyle in the mantle cavity of freshwater mussels has been recorded since the second half of the 19th century. Yet... more
Methotrexate appears to facilitate bone remodeling in patients with osteoarthritis  NEWS MEDICAL · 1 week
According to new research findings presented at the 2019 ACR/ARP Annual Meeting, methotrexate did not demonstrate superior efficacy over placebo for pain relief and function evolution at three... more
New sphenisciform fossil further resolves bauplan of extinct giant penguins  PHYS.ORG · 2 weeks
Penguins are descendants of seabirds that lost the ability to fly more than 60 million years ago in exchange for chasing the abundant food available in the ocean.... more
NeanderthalsExtinctionSentienceDinosaurs
MORE SCIENCE VIDEO
NASA's Mars 2020 will hunt for microscopic fossils
PHYS.ORG
Vietnam deer rediscovered after nearly 30 years
PHYS.ORG
Emperor penguins could march to extinction if nations fail to halt climate change
PHYS.ORG
Galactic fountains and carousels: order emerging from chaos
PHYS.ORG
How do we know when a species at risk has recovered? It's not just a matter of numbers
PHYS.ORG
What Is Convergent Evolution?
LIVE SCIENCE
Monkey fossils found in Serbia offer clues about life in a warmer world millions of years ago
PHYS.ORG
FRESH SCIENCE