Engineering
COSMIC-2 soars into orbit aboard SpaceX Falcon Heavy rocket  PHYS.ORG · 60 minutes
COSMIC-2, a mission of six satellites designed to improve weather forecasts and space weather monitoring, blasted into orbit at 2:30 a.m. ET today, June 25, from Cape Canaveral, Florida, aboard... more
Patients with biliary tract cancer have altered genetic architecture in immune system  NEWS MEDICAL · 1 hour
Patients with biliary tract cancer have altered genetic architecture in some immune system receptors. more
Big data and innovations for healthy bees  PHYS.ORG · 2 hours
Big data, an interactive platform and six different technological innovations are the core of the recently started Horizon 2020 project B-GOOD (http://b-good-project.eu/) in its 4-year mission to pave the way toward healthy and sustainable... more
Solar steam generators could be made with wood, fabric or sponges  PHYS.ORG · 2 hours
As the global population grows, fresh water supplies are more precious than ever. While scientists and engineers know how to purify water, making those methods sustainable... more
Researchers explore architectural design of quantum computers  PHYS.ORG · 2 hours
A recent study led by Princeton University researchers, in collaboration with University of Maryland and IBM, explored the architectural design of quantum computers (QC). In a paper presented at the 2019 ACM/IEEE International Symposium... more
Bruker announces novel phenomics solutions at Metabolomics 2019  NEWS MEDICAL · 4 hours
At Metabolomics 2019, Bruker highlights innovative MS and NMR systems, and novel high-value solutions for molecular phenomics and clinical metabolomics. more
Lessons from Columbine: New technology provides insight during active shooter situations  PHYS.ORG · 8 hours
Run, hide, fight. It has become a mantra for how to act during an active shooter situation. The idea is to escape the situation or protect... more
Role of biochip advancements in next-generation sequencing  NEWS MEDICAL · 9 hours
Biochips are essentially tiny laboratories designed to function inside living organisms, and they are driving next-generation DNA sequencing technologies. more
Study: Social robots can benefit hospitalized children  MIT · 10 hours
Interacting with a robotic teddy bear invented at MIT boosted young patients’ positive emotions, engagement, and activity level. more
Algorithm designed to map universe, solve mysteries  SCIENCE DAILY · 10 hours
Researchers have developed an algorithm designed to visualize models of the universe in order to solve some of physics' greatest mysteries. more
Mayo Clinic receives gift of $5 million to create innovative Center for Women's Health  NEWS MEDICAL · 12 hours
Mayo Clinic has received a combined gift of $5 million from Penny and Bill George, and the George Family Foundation,... more
Griffin’s assistant director for space named acting director of Space Development Agency  SPACE NEWS · 16 hours
Tournear will be 'dual-hatted' as SDA acting director and assistant director for space at the office of the undersecretary of defense for research and... more
Power of simple physical models for complex protein machines  SCIENCE DAILY · 21 hours
The function of protein machines in biological cells is so complex that even supercomputers cannot predict their cycles at atomic detail. But many aspects of their operation at mesoscales can... more
Payloads deployed by SpaceX to study space weather and spacecraft propulsion  PHYS.ORG · 22 hours
U.S. Naval Research Laboratory researchers designed and built two science payloads that went up with SpaceX's Falcon 9 Heavy rocket launch on June 25. more
Biochip advances enable next-generation sequencing technologies  PHYS.ORG · 22 hours
Biochips are essentially tiny laboratories designed to function inside living organisms, and they are driving next-generation DNA sequencing technologies. This powerful combination is capable of solving unique and important biological problems, such as single-cell, rare-cell or... more
Islands in the sun: Heatwave gives cities that sinking feeling  PHYS.ORG · 22 hours
Boffins call it a heat sink—a passive exchanger designed to dissipate heat—but when the sink is an actual city, its concrete and asphalt sweltering in the heat, it... more
Engineers automate science from remote Antarctic station  PHYS.ORG · 1 day
A remote and unoccupied research station in Antarctica has, for the first time, collected important scientific measurements of climate, ozone and space weather thanks to ground-breaking technology developed by British Antarctic Survey's (BAS) engineers. more
For less than $200, engineering students built a realistic robotic fish  PHYS.ORG · 1 day
Mechanical engineering students challenged themselves to make a robotic fish that not only swims like a real fish, but looks the part too, demonstrating the possibilities... more
Testing designed carbon materials to purify wastewater  PHYS.ORG · 1 day
Waste streams from industry and agriculture could be used for the production of coal that can serve as a cheap adsorbent for water purification. In her thesis at the Industrial Doctoral School, Mirva Niinipuu... more
Lab Innovations launches free advance registration for all visitors  NEWS MEDICAL · 1 day
Lab Innovations, the UK’s only trade show dedicated to the laboratory industry, has launched free advance registration for all visitors at www.lab-innovations.com. more
Which climate innovations will really limit global warming?  PHYS.ORG · 1 day
From a chemical-free spray that turns sand into lush green land, to a caterer who serves planet-friendly dishes, and from technology that makes stronger concrete with less cement, to insect farms that... more
Nanion launches HTS automated patch clamp platform  NEWS MEDICAL · 1 day
The SyncroPatch 384i is a giga-ohm seal HTS automated patch clamp platform designed for flexibility, ease-of-use and reliability. It follows a decade of collaboration between Beckman Coulter Life Science and Nanion Technologies. more
Tapping into the way cells communicate  PHYS.ORG · 1 day
A new technology discovered by UConn School of Dental Medicine researchers records cellular communication in real time—providing a closer look into the dynamics of cell secretion and a greater understanding of how cells repair tissue. more
Family Doctors play key role in imparting health education on advanced therapies  NEWS MEDICAL · 1 day
A recent study conducted jointly by the Tissue Engineering Research Group of the Department of Histology and the Family Medicine Unit of the University... more
AASLD Foundation awards $3.42 million for liver disease research and advanced hepatology training  NEWS MEDICAL · 1 day
The American Association for the Study of Liver Diseases Foundation, the largest private supporter of liver disease research and training in the... more
Engineered cell evolution may provide a path to reduce chemotherapy resistance  NEWS MEDICAL · 1 day
A significant problem when treating cancer patients remains drug resistance, which often causes chemotherapy treatments to ultimately fail. more
Engineering enzymes to turn plant waste into sustainable products  PHYS.ORG · 2 days
A new family of enzymes has been engineered to perform one of the most important steps in the conversion of plant waste into sustainable and high-value products such as nylon,... more
Visible light from 2D lead halide perovskites explained  SCIENCE DAILY · 2 days
Electrical engineers have reported solving a lingering question about how a two-dimensional crystal composed of cesium, lead and bromine emitted a strong green light, opening the door to designing better light-emitting and... more
NASA's New Salmon-Colored 'Green' Fuel Is a Much Safer Propellant  SPACE.COM · 2 days
SpaceX's next Falcon Heavy launch will carry a satellite designed to test a new type of rocket fuel, the first ever "green" propellant in space. Only it's not... more
'Nanoemulsion' gels offer new way to deliver drugs through the skin  SCIENCE DAILY · 2 days
MIT chemical engineers have devised a new way to create nanoemulsions, very tiny droplets of one liquid suspended within another. They also developed a way to... more
Play games with no latency  SCIENCE DAILY · 2 days
One of the most challenging issues for game players looks to be resolved soon with the introduction of a zero-latency gaming environment. A team has now developed technology that helps game players maintain zero-latency performance. The new technology... more
Government-funded research increasingly fuels innovation  PHYS.ORG · 2 days
For the third year in a row, the Trump administration has proposed large cuts in science funding across a variety of agencies. Although Congress restored these cuts in the past two years, increased budgetary pressures may discourage them... more
Querying big data just got universal  PHYS.ORG · 2 days
To solve one of the key obstacles in big-data science, KAUST researchers have created a framework for searching very large datasets that runs easily on different computing architectures. Their achievement allows researchers to concentrate on advancing... more
Two new resources to enhance level of care for patients with obesity  NEWS MEDICAL · 2 days
Advocates for obesity prevention and treatment have designed two new resources for medical educators, healthcare providers and community programs that will enhance the level... more
ScreenIn3D receives technology innovation prize  NEWS MEDICAL · 2 days
ScreenIn3D, a partner of AMSBIO, has received a share of the £1 million plus prize pot and will receive ongoing support from partners of Scottish Edge - a respected regional business support agency. more
Play games with no latency  PHYS.ORG · 2 days
One of the most challenging issues for game players looks to be resolved soon with the introduction of a zero-latency gaming environment. A KAIST team developed a technology that helps game players maintain zero-latency performance. The new technology... more
Scientists develop climate-ready wheat that can survive drought conditions  PHYS.ORG · 2 days
Wheat plants engineered to have fewer microscopic pores—called stomata—on their leaves are better able to survive drought conditions associated with climate breakdown, according to a new study. more
New technology helps search teams find people in wilderness  PHYS.ORG · 2 days
Yesenia D'Alessandro loaded a GPS tracking app on her cellphone and trudged into a remote Hawaii forest, joining more than 100 other volunteers looking for a missing hiker. more
Texas A&M researchers receive grant to develop super-repellent, anti-fouling food surfaces  NEWS MEDICAL · 2 days
Texas A&M AgriLife Research and the Texas A&M Engineering Experiment Station, TEES, were recently awarded a grant from the U.S. Department of Agriculture's National Institute of... more
Northeast Hub receives grant to build cross-sector data science partnerships  NEWS MEDICAL · 2 days
The Northeast Big Data Innovation Hub has been awarded a four year, $4 million grant from the National Science Foundation to continue its work in building cross-sector data... more
Harmful algal blooms in lakes, reservoirs  SCIENCE DAILY · 4 days
With limited resources to monitor often-unpredictable algae blooms, water managers are turning to new technologies from NASA and its partners to detect and keep track of potential hazards. more
New Type of Computer Memory Invented  SCI-NEWS.COM · 5 days
An oxide-free, floating-gate memory cell invented and patented by Lancaster University researchers promises to transform daily life with its ultra-low energy consumption. The new... more
High-speed black phosphorus field-effect transistors approaching ballistic limit  Science Magazine · 5 days
As a strong candidate for future electronics, atomically thin black phosphorus (BP) has attracted great attention in recent years because of its tunable bandgap and high carrier mobility. Here, we show that... more
Blue pigment from engineered fungi could help turn the textile industry green  PHYS.ORG · 5 days
Often, the findings of fundamental scientific research are many steps away from a product that can be immediately brought to the public. But every... more
MIT engineers devise new way to create nanoemulsions  NEWS MEDICAL · 5 days
MIT chemical engineers have devised a new way to create very tiny droplets of one liquid suspended within another liquid, known as nanoemulsions. more
Climbing droplets driven by mechanowetting on transverse waves  PHYS.ORG · 5 days
Modern applications use self-cleaning strategies and digital microfluids to control individual droplets of fluids on flat surfaces but existing techniques are limited by the side-effects of high electric fields and high temperatures.... more
Researchers make steps toward debugging tools for quantum computers  PHYS.ORG · 5 days
In classical computing, debugging programs is one of the most time-consuming tasks in software development. Successful debugging relies on software development tools and also on the experience of the programmer.... more
New DNA Microscopy Technique Offers Novel Insight into Genomic Information in Cells  NEWS MEDICAL · 5 days
Scientists are now able to see inside cells to a genomic level with a newly invented imaging technique called DNA microscopy. Using DNA “bar... more
New e-tattoo beats conventional methods at monitoring heart health  NEWS MEDICAL · 5 days
Engineers at the University of Texas at Austin have developed a new “e-tattoo” that could enable easier and more accurate heart monitoring than the current technology allows. more
Mars 2020 rover gets its wheels  PHYS.ORG · 5 days
In this image, taken on June 13, 2019, engineers at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Pasadena, California, install the starboard legs and wheels—otherwise known as the mobility suspension—on the Mars 2020 rover. They installed the port... more
How NASA’s portable atomic clock could revolutionize space travel  SCIENCE-NEWS · 5 days
An atomic clock designed to enable self-driving spaceships and GPS-like navigation on other planets is about to take a yearlong test flight. more
Lean manufacturing methods spur innovations in the testing of drug delivery devices  NEWS MEDICAL · 5 days
The number of people who live with diabetes is on the rise. By estimates of the World Health Organization (WHO), one in eleven people... more
MIT engineers design pliable 3D-printed mesh materials for ankle and knee braces  NEWS MEDICAL · 5 days
Hearing aids, dental crowns, and limb prosthetics are some of the medical devices that can now be digitally designed and customized for individual patients,... more
'Nanoemulsion' gels offer new way to deliver drugs through the skin  PHYS.ORG · 5 days
MIT chemical engineers have devised a new way to create very tiny droplets of one liquid suspended within another liquid, known as nanoemulsions. Such emulsions are... more
New technology replaces the standard way to repair a hole in the heart  NEWS MEDICAL · 5 days
Rush University Medical Center is the first hospital in Chicago to use a new technology that enables specially trained physicians to use... more
MIT engineers design pliable, 3-D-printed mesh materials  NEWS MEDICAL · 5 days
Hearing aids, dental crowns, and limb prosthetics are some of the medical devices that can now be digitally designed and customized for individual patients, thanks to 3-D printing. more
Perfect quantum portal emerges at exotic interface  SCIENCE DAILY · 5 days
Researchers have captured the most direct evidence to date of Klein tunneling, a quantum quirk that allows particles to tunnel through a barrier like it's not even there. The result may enable engineers to... more
New platform flips traditional on-demand supply chain approach on its head  SCIENCE DAILY · 6 days
Engineers have demonstrated how a hierarchical model that provides suppliers with a certain amount of choice could improve supply and demand matching for underutilized resources --... more
Researchers invent graphene-based biosensor to detect stomach-cancer causing bacteria  NEWS MEDICAL · 6 days
Biosensors are currently used in healthcare to monitor blood glucose; however, they also have the potential to detect bacteria. more
Engineers 3D print flexible mesh for ankle and knee braces  SCIENCE DAILY · 6 days
Engineers have designed pliable, 3D-printed mesh materials whose flexibility and toughness they can tune to emulate and support softer tissues such as muscles and tendons. They can tailor... more
Particle analogs of electrons in colloidal crystals  Science Magazine · 6 days
A versatile method for the design of colloidal crystals involves the use of DNA as a particle-directing ligand. With such systems, DNA-nanoparticle conjugates are considered programmable atom equivalents (PAEs), and design rules have been... more
Slack Technologies rises in Wall Street debut  PHYS.ORG · 6 days
Software company Slack Technologies climbed on the New York Stock Exchange Thursday after entering in a direct listing in the latest sign of Wall Street's appetite for new technology entrants. more
Researchers study super-repellent surfaces for safer fruits, vegetables  PHYS.ORG · 6 days
Texas A&M AgriLife Research and the Texas A&M Engineering Experiment Station, TEES, were recently awarded a grant from the U.S. Department of Agriculture's National Institute of Food and Agriculture to study and... more
Synthetic joint lubricant holds promise for osteoarthritis  SCIENCE DAILY · 6 days
A new type of treatment for osteoarthritis, currently in canine clinical trials, shows promise for eventual use in humans. The treatment, developed by biomedical engineers, is a synthetic version of a naturally occurring joint... more
Cancer test, plastic recycling win Europe inventor awards  PHYS.ORG · 6 days
A diagnostic tool to assess the risk of a cancer relapse, machines for plastic recycling, an alternative to toxic ship paint— all were among the inventions honoured at the European Inventor Awards... more
Using graphene and tiny droplets to detect stomach-cancer causing bacteria  PHYS.ORG · 6 days
Biosensors are currently used in healthcare to monitor blood glucose; however, they also have the potential to detect bacteria. Researchers at Osaka University have invented a new biosensor... more
Future cities will need a holistic vision 'for the benefit of the entire society'  PHYS.ORG · 6 days
Catherine Peters, chair and professor of civil and environmental engineering, discusses the future of infrastructure, the urgency of integrating large-scale... more
A new route for plant nutrient delivery  PHYS.ORG · 6 days
Agriculture around the globe requires new solutions for food and water sustainability. With more frequent climate extremes, growing populations, increased food demand, and global crop threats, environmental engineers are searching for solutions to manage... more
Using graphene and tiny droplets to detect stomach-cancer causing bacteria  nanowerk · 6 days
Scientists have invented a new biosensor using graphene to detect bacteria such as those that attack the stomach lining and that have been linked to stomach cancer. When... more
Researchers improve semiconductor laser on silicon  PHYS.ORG · 6 days
Electrical engineering researchers have boosted the operating temperature of a promising new semiconductor laser on silicon substrate, moving it one step closer to possible commercial application. more
Machine learning unlocks mysteries of quantum physics  PHYS.ORG · 6 days
Understanding electrons' intricate behavior has led to discoveries that transformed society, such as the revolution in computing made possible by the invention of the transistor. more
Survey: Slow adoption of new technology is impacting pharmacy services  NEWS MEDICAL · 6 days
A new survey released today (20th June 2019), has found that 87% of pharmacists believe the profession has been slow in its adoption of new technology when compared... more
UT Dallas adds MILabs Hybrid OI/CT system to its innovative medical imaging solutions  NEWS MEDICAL · 6 days
The Department of Bioengineering at the UT Dallas is adding a MILabs Hybrid OI/CT system to its innovative medical imaging solutions. more
Scientists chart course toward a new world of synthetic biology  SCIENCE DAILY · 7 days
A team has compiled a roadmap for the future of synthetic or engineering biology, based on the input of 80 leaders in the field from more than 30... more
A miniature robot that could check colons for early signs of disease  SCIENCE DAILY · 7 days
Engineers have shown it is technically possible to guide a tiny robotic capsule inside the colon to take micro-ultrasound images. Known as a Sonopill,... more
There's More To Look Forward To After Peaking Professionally  NPR · 7 days
Social scientist Arthur Brooks set out to figure out how life after 50 can be more professionally fulfilling. His advice? "Stop being an innovator and start being an instructor." more
Scientists chart course toward a new world of synthetic biology  PHYS.ORG · 7 days
Genetically engineered trees that provide fire-resistant lumber for homes. Modified organs that won't be rejected. Synthetic microbes that monitor your gut to detect invading disease organisms and kill... more
Phage display for engineering blood-contacting surfaces  PHYS.ORG · 7 days
Surfaces that enable endothelial cell attachment without causing blood clotting are needed for various tissue engineering efforts. A new approach involving phage display has been used to identify unique peptides with these typically divergent characteristics. The... more
Perfect quantum portal emerges at exotic interface  PHYS.ORG · 7 days
Researchers at the University of Maryland have captured the most direct evidence to date of a quantum quirk that allows particles to tunnel through a barrier like it's not even there. The result, featured... more
Fifty years after the Cuyahoga conflagration  PHYS.ORG · 7 days
On June 22, 1969, the Cuyahoga River, which flows through Cleveland, Ohio, caught fire. Although firefighters extinguished the blaze within 30 minutes, the shocking event helped galvanize the U.S. environmental movement. Fifty years later, the river... more
Nature-inspired materials can be used in applications ranging from tunneling to space  PHYS.ORG · 7 days
Optimal materials for cutting tools of tunnel boring machines (TBM) were developed in the recently finished three-year long project "Innovative polycrystalline diamond (PDC) drag... more
A forest of nano-mushroom structures keep this plastic clean and stain-free  PHYS.ORG · 7 days
Technologies like solar panels and LEDs require a cover material that repels water, dirt and oil while still letting plenty of light through. There is also... more
Fatty fish without environmental pollutants protect against type 2 diabetes  SCIENCE DAILY · 7 days
If the fatty fish we eat were free of environmental pollutants, it would reduce our risk of developing type 2 diabetes. However, the pollutants in the fish have... more
Upcycling process brings new life to old jeans  PHYS.ORG · 7 days
A growing population, rising standards of living and quickly changing fashions send mountains of clothing waste to the world's landfills each year. Although processes for textile recycling exist, they tend to be... more
Secure quantum communications in the microwave range for the first time  PHYS.ORG · 7 days
Mikel Sanz, of the Physical Chemistry Department of UPV/EHU, leads the theoretical group for an experiment published by the prestigious journal, Nature Communications. The experiment has... more
Researchers enhance security in proof of stake blockchain protocols  PHYS.ORG · 7 days
Blockchain Technology is known to be one of the top disruptive technologies of today that is driving the fourth industrial revolution. A blockchain, designed to be resistant to the modification... more
Image: Metal bracket in Ariane 5 is 3-D-printed in titanium  PHYS.ORG · 1 week
This organically-styled bracket, designed for the interior of an Ariane 5 launcher, was 3-D printed in space-worthy titanium alloy for an R&D project. more
Engineers 3-D print flexible mesh for ankle and knee braces  MIT · 1 week
Techniques could lead to personalized wearable and implantable devices. more
Spinning star scientists  PHYS.ORG · 1 week
Scientists at a research university often play a formative role in the commercialization of intellectual property and inventions emerging from their laboratories. Often, the "spinning off" of a startup company will be to the benefit of society as a whole... more
AI, robots, data software helping create new approach for planning cities of the future  PHYS.ORG · 1 week
Artificial intelligence and robots are playing significant roles as planners develop the cities of the future. The architecture, engineering and... more
Advancing AI for video: Startup launches powerful video processing platform  PHYS.ORG · 1 week
Voxel51, a University of Michigan startup, today launched its flagship product—a software platform designed to make it easier, faster and more affordable to access the untapped potential of... more
New technology by Neurodata Lab acquires accurate physiological data  NEWS MEDICAL · 1 week
New technology by Neurodata Lab is capable to acquire physiological data by simply pointing a webcam at one’s face, with accuracy comparable to special wearable equipment. more
NEEMO: Testing space gear under the sea  PHYS.ORG · 1 week
NASA's Extreme Environment Mission Operations takes place more than 18 meters below the surface of the Atlantic Ocean. For nine days, astronauts, engineers, and scientists live and work underwater, testing new technologies for space. more
Lessons from Columbine: New technology provides insight during active shooter situations
PHYS.ORG
For less than $200, engineering students built a realistic robotic fish
PHYS.ORG
Researchers study super-repellent surfaces for safer fruits, vegetables
PHYS.ORG
A new route for plant nutrient delivery
PHYS.ORG
Engineers boost output of solar desalination system by 50%
PHYS.ORG
Starshade would take formation flying to extremes
PHYS.ORG
Researchers develop new metamaterial that can improve MRI quality and reduce scan time
PHYS.ORG
InSight's team tries new strategy to help the 'mole'
PHYS.ORG
At-line Food Production Analysis using an Innovative NIR Spectrometer
NEWS MEDICAL
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