Engineering
Bioprinting complex living tissue in just a few seconds  PHYS.ORG · 2 hours
Tissue engineers create artificial organs and tissues that can be used to develop and test new drugs, repair damaged tissue and even replace entire organs in the human body. However,... more
Bioprinting complex living tissue in just a few seconds  SCIENCE DAILY · 3 hours
Researchers have developed an extremely fast optical method for sculpting complex shapes in stem-cell-laden hydrogels and then vascularizing the resulting tissue. Their groundbreaking technique stands to change the field of... more
Experiments illuminate key component of plants' immune systems  SCIENCE DAILY · 4 hours
Biologists have shed new light on a crucial aspect of the plant immune response. Their discovery, revealing how plant resistance proteins trigger localized cell death, could lead to new strategies for engineering... more
Cracking a decades-old test, researchers bolster case for quantum mechanics  SCIENCE DAILY · 6 hours
Researchers have developed creative tactics to get rid of loopholes that have long confounded tests of quantum mechanics. With their innovative method, the researchers were able to demonstrate... more
Geoengineering: 'Plan B' for the planet  PHYS.ORG · 6 hours
Dismissed a decade ago as far-fetched and dangerous, schemes to tame global warming by engineering the climate have migrated from the margins of policy debates towards centre stage. more
Creating textiles and cosmetics of the future with nanotechnology  PHYS.ORG · 6 hours
By using nanocapsules, scientists and industrial partners are developing innovative garments and skin products that provide thermal comfort, and anti-aging and antimicrobial properties. more
Living Cells Can Record and Track Genomic Events with New “Designer Cell” Computer Technology  NEWS MEDICAL · 7 hours
Published in Molecular Cell, researchers at Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) have developed a new technology that uses DNA to... more
Smartphone app makes parents more attuned to their babies' needs, research shows  SCIENCE DAILY · 20 hours
A new app has been designed to help new parents become more 'tuned in' to what their babies are thinking and feeling. more
Lasers enable engineers to weld ceramics, no furnace required  SCIENCE DAILY · 21 hours
Smartphones that don't scratch or shatter. Metal-free pacemakers. Electronics for space and other harsh environments. These could all be made possible thanks to a new ceramic welding technology. The process... more
Cracking a decades-old test, researchers bolster case for quantum mechanics  PHYS.ORG · 23 hours
In a new study, researchers demonstrate creative tactics to get rid of loopholes that have long confounded tests of quantum mechanics. With their innovative method, the researchers were... more
Biomaterials smarten up with CRISPR  nanowerk · 23 hours
Programmable CRISPR-responsive smart materials could open the door to novel tissue engineering, bioelectronic, and diagnostic applications. more
Creating textiles and cosmetics of the future with nanotechnology  nanowerk · 23 hours
By using nanocapsules, scientists and industrial partners are developing innovative garments and skin products that provide thermal comfort, and anti-ageing and antimicrobial properties. more
Phase-change heterostructure enables ultralow noise and drift for memory operation  Science Magazine · 24 hours
Artificial intelligence and other data-intensive applications have escalated the demand for data storage and processing. New computing devices, e.g., phase-change random access memory (PCRAM) based neuro-inspired devices, are... more
Structure and conformational plasticity of the intact Thermus thermophilus V/A-type ATPase  Science Magazine · 1 day
V (vacuolar)/A (archaeal)-type adenosine triphosphatases (ATPases), found in archaea and eubacteria, couple ATP hydrolysis or synthesis to proton translocation across the plasma membrane using the rotary-catalysis... more
New technology may help repel water, save lives through improved medical devices  PHYS.ORG · 1 day
Imagine a better windshield that easily repels water and requires less wiping. Now imagine if that same technology could allow doctors to better detect... more
Ultrahigh thermal isolation across heterogeneously layered two-dimensional materials  PHYS.ORG · 1 day
Heterogeneous nanomaterials can now facilitate advanced electronics and photonics applications, but such progress is challenging for thermal applications due to the comparatively shorter wavelengths of heat carriers (known as phonons). In a... more
Identified: Molecular structure that breaks down an important component of smog  PHYS.ORG · 1 day
Nitrogen oxides, also known as NOx, form when fossil fuels burn at high temperatures. When emitted from industrial sources such as coal power plants, these pollutants... more
STEM: Efforts to inspire more children could be entrenching educational inequalities  PHYS.ORG · 1 day
Science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM) education is a priority for governments around the world. For example, the UK's current commitment to increasing investment in research... more
Quantum computers to become portable  PHYS.ORG · 1 day
Together with the University of Innsbruck, the ETH Zurich and Interactive Fully Electrical Vehicles SRL, Infineon Austria is researching specific questions on the commercial use of quantum computers. With new innovations in design and manufacturing, the partners from... more
Breakthroughs seen in artificial eye and muscle technology  PHYS.ORG · 1 day
Inspired by the human eye, researchers at the Harvard John A. Paulson School of Engineering and Applied Sciences (SEAS) have developed an adaptive metalens that is essentially a flat, electronically controlled artificial... more
The Francis Crick Institute, Making Lab  NEWS MEDICAL · 2 days
Henniker Plasma Technology supporting research at the Innovative Life Science Research Lab more
Scientists propose network of imaging centers to drive innovation in biological research  SCIENCE DAILY · 2 days
When sparks fly to innovate new technologies for imaging life at the microscopic scale, often diverse researchers are nudging each other with a kind... more
New pharmaceutical target reverses osteoporosis in mice  SCIENCE DAILY · 2 days
Biomedical engineers have discovered that an adenosine receptor called A2B can be pharmaceutically activated to reverse bone degradation caused by osteoporosis in mouse models of the disease. more
Scientists propose network of imaging centers to drive innovation in biological research  PHYS.ORG · 2 days
When sparks fly to innovate new technologies for imaging life at the microscopic scale, often diverse researchers are nudging each other with a kind... more
NASA awards Aerospace Corp. contract worth up to $621 million  SPACE NEWS · 2 days
NASA awarded the Aerospace Corp. an engineering, evaluation and testing support contract with a maximum potential... more
'Kissing loops' in RNA molecule essential for its role in tumor suppression  SCIENCE DAILY · 2 days
Researchers have discovered that the tumor suppressor MEG3 adopts a complex three-dimensional structure to fulfill its function. Furthermore, they were able to fine-tune its... more
Applying machine learning in intelligent weather consultation  PHYS.ORG · 2 days
Weather forecasting is a typical problem of coupling big data with physical-process models, according to Prof. Pingwen Zhang, an academician of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Director of the National Engineering Laboratory for Big Data... more
Engineers make transistors and electronic devices entirely from thread  nanowerk · 2 days
Transistors and integrated circuits made from threads are combined with thread-based sensors to create fully flexible devices. more
Self-assembled membrane with water-continuous transport pathways for precise nanofiltration  PHYS.ORG · 2 days
Self-assembled materials are attractive for next-generation materials, but their potential to assemble at the nanoscale and form nanostructures (cylinders, lamellae etc.) remains challenging. In a recent report, Xundu Feng and... more
Engineers make transistors and electronic devices entirely from thread  SCIENCE DAILY · 2 days
A team of engineers has developed a transistor made from linen thread, enabling them to create electronic devices made entirely of thin threads that could be woven into fabric, worn... more
Engineers make transistors and electronic devices entirely from thread  PHYS.ORG · 2 days
A team of engineers has developed a transistor made from linen thread, enabling them to create electronic devices made entirely of thin threads that could be woven into fabric, worn... more
MEG3 kissing loops essential for tumor suppression  PHYS.ORG · 2 days
A team of researchers in the Marcia group at EMBL Grenoble have discovered that the tumor suppressor MEG3 adopts a complex three-dimensional structure to fulfill its function. Furthermore, they were able to fine-tune its... more
Seeking innovative ideas for exploring lunar caves  ESA · 2 days
How would you design a system to detect, map and explore caves on the Moon? Our latest hunt for ideas is seeking novel initiatives... more
NeuroCatch platform used to conduct clinical study on pediatric concussion  NEWS MEDICAL · 3 days
NeuroCatch Inc., a brain-focused health technology company committed to translating research innovations into real-world medical devices and applications, is pleased to announce a research collaboration in brain vital... more
Mathematical framework turns any sheet of material into any shape using kirigami cuts  PHYS.ORG · 3 days
Researchers from the Harvard John A. Paulson School of Engineering and Applied Sciences (SEAS) have developed a mathematical framework that can turn... more
Machine learning models help clinicians identify people who need advanced depression care  SCIENCE DAILY · 3 days
Researchers have created decision models capable of predicting which patients might need more treatment for their depression than what their primary care provider can... more
Cost-effective fuel cell technology  SCIENCE DAILY · 3 days
Researchers have identified ammonia as a source for engineering fuel cells that can provide a cheap and powerful source for fueling cars, trucks and buses with a reduced carbon footprint. more
Indigenous scholars confront the power, limitations of genomics  PHYS.ORG · 3 days
They traveled to central Illinois from Manitoba, Mexico City, Nova Scotia and 18 U.S. states, bringing expertise in a variety of fields, including anthropology, biomedical engineering, ethics, health and environmental policy, law,... more
Methods for reducing the risks of melting glaciers  PHYS.ORG · 3 days
Under a pilot project being spearheaded by the Swiss Agency for Development and Cooperation (SDC), a team of experts—including civil and environmental engineers from EPFL—are studying methods to help protect a region... more
Catalysts for climate protection  PHYS.ORG · 3 days
How can we achieve the internationally agreed climate targets? The Fraunhofer Institute for Interfacial Engineering and Biotechnology IGB makes the greenhouse gas CO2 usable as a carbon source for the chemical industry. With a patented catalyst synthesis, screening for the... more
Abcam collaborates with Visikol to develop new tools for improved tissue clearing and 3D imaging  NEWS MEDICAL · 3 days
Abcam, a global innovator in life science reagents and tools, and Visikol, a contract research organization focused on... more
Using principles of mechanics and physics to identify state of individual cells  NEWS MEDICAL · 3 days
Researchers at the NYU Tandon School of Engineering have discovered a new way to identify the state of individual cells by bringing principles of... more
Medical News Today: Wearable tech works like a Band-Aid to monitor health  MNT · 4 days
Stanford researchers introduce an innovative, wearable tech device that monitors breathing, heart rate, and movements without batteries, wires, or chips. more
Research using mechanics and physics could predict diseases that 'stress out' cells  PHYS.ORG · 4 days
Researchers at the NYU Tandon School of Engineering have discovered a new way to identify the state of individual cells by bringing principles of... more
Materials that can revolutionize how light is harnessed for solar energy  SCIENCE DAILY · 4 days
Scientists have designed organic molecules capable of generating two excitons per photon of light, a process called singlet fission. The excitons can live for much longer... more
How NASA is becoming more business friendly  PHYS.ORG · 4 days
A new case study demonstrates the steps being taken by the U.S. National Aeronautics and Space Agency (NASA) to make it easier for small businesses and entrepreneurs to understand its needs and do business... more
A laser-driven programmable non-contact transfer printing technique  PHYS.ORG · 4 days
A laser-driven programmable non-contact transfer printing technique via an active elastomeric micro-structured stamp, which offers continuously thermal-controlled tunable adhesion with a large switchability of more than 103 at a temperature increase below 100 °C,... more
Scientists uncover mystery of DNA methylation  SCIENCE DAILY · 4 days
To a large extent, DNA methylation, which regulates vital cell functions, is still a big mystery to the scientific world. Now,, scientists have developed a method to quickly couple methylation enzymes to their respective methylation pattern.... more
Innovative valve train saves 20% fuel  SCIENCE DAILY · 4 days
Scientists have developed an innovative, electrohydraulically actuated valve train for internal combustion engines, that enables completely free adjustment of stroke and timing, while at the same time being robust and cost effective. This valve train was... more
Uncertainty in emissions estimates in the spotlight  PHYS.ORG · 4 days
National or other emissions inventories of greenhouse gases that are used to develop strategies and track progress in terms of emissions reductions for climate mitigation contain a certain amount of uncertainty, which inevitably has... more
Scientists complete LSST's digital sensor array  PHYS.ORG · 4 days
After 16 years of dedicated planning and engineering, scientists at the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Brookhaven National Laboratory have completed a 3.2 gigapixel sensor array for the camera that will be used in the Large... more
Type of brain cell involved in stuttering identified  SCIENCE DAILY · 4 days
Researchers believe that stuttering -- a potentially lifelong and debilitating speech disorder -- stems from problems with the circuits in the brain that control speech, but precisely how and where these problems... more
Uncertainty in greenhouse gas emissions estimates  SCIENCE DAILY · 4 days
National or other emissions inventories of greenhouse gases that are used to develop strategies and track progress in terms of emissions reductions for climate mitigation contain a certain amount of uncertainty, which inevitably has an impact... more
Highly uniform and low hysteresis pressure sensor to increase practical applicability  SCIENCE DAILY · 4 days
Researchers have designed a flexible pressure sensor that is expected to have a much wider applicability. A research team fabricated a piezoresistive pressure sensor of high... more
Highly uniform and low hysteresis pressure sensor to increase practical applicability  PHYS.ORG · 4 days
Researchers have designed a flexible pressure sensor that is expected to have a much wider applicability. A KAIST research team fabricated a piezoresistive pressure sensor of... more
Green chemistry labs teach students a sustainable and innovative mindset  PHYS.ORG · 4 days
The chemical industry has been responsible for numerous technological advancements, but also many environmental problems and disasters. Principles applied through what's called green chemistry seek to reduce or... more
Organic food health benefits have been hard to assess, but that could change  PHYS.ORG · 4 days
"Organic" is more than just a passing fad. Organic food sales totaled a record US$45.2 billion in 2017, making it one of... more
Chemical and physical origins of friction on surfaces with atomic steps  PHYS.ORG · 4 days
Friction results from a set of complex processes that act together to resist relative motion. Despite this complexity, friction is often described using simple phenomenological expressions... more
Climate misinformation may be thriving on YouTube, a social scientist warns  SCIENCE-NEWS · 4 days
Analyzing 200 climate-related videos on YouTube shows that a majority challenge widely accepted views about climate change and climate engineering. more
A new perspective on evolution provided by fly testes  NEWS MEDICAL · 5 days
The male testes are important areas for biological innovation, as well as being a factory for sperm. In exciting new biological research a team of scientists has found that the... more
Using Wall Street secrets to reduce the cost of cloud infrastructure  MIT · 5 days
“Risk-aware” traffic engineering could help service providers such as Microsoft, Amazon, and Google better utilize network infrastructure. more
Stanford engineers develop stickers to detect physiological signals emanating from the skin  NEWS MEDICAL · 5 days
We tend to take our skin's protective function for granted, ignoring its other roles in signaling subtleties like a fluttering heart or a flush... more
Wireless stick-on sensors pick up physiological signals emanating from the skin  nanowerk · 6 days
Engineers have developed experimental stickers that pick up physiological signals emanating from the skin, then wirelessly beam these health readings to a receiver clipped onto clothing.... more
From the tiny testes of flies, new insight into how genes arise  SCIENCE DAILY · 7 days
A common birthplace of new genes, the male testes are a hotspot for biological innovation. Within these organs, scientists have found a trove of... more
From the tiny testes of flies, new insight into how genes arise  PHYS.ORG · 7 days
In the battle of the sexes, males appear to have the innovative edge—from a genetic standpoint, at least. Scientists are finding that the testes... more
Solution-processed transparent ferroelectric nylon thin films  Science Magazine · 1 week
Ferroelectricity, a bistable ordering of electrical dipoles in a material, is widely used in sensors, actuators, nonlinear optics, and data storage. Traditional ferroelectrics are ceramic based. Ferroelectric polymers are inexpensive lead-free materials that offer unique features... more
Wireless sensors that stick to the skin to track our health  SCIENCE DAILY · 1 week
Engineers have developed experimental stickers that pick up physiological signals emanating from the skin, then wirelessly beam these health readings to a receiver clipped onto clothing.... more
Vision Engineering launches world's first digital stereoscopic 3D-view microscope  NEWS MEDICAL · 1 week
Vision Engineering, a manufacturer of high quality visual inspection and measurement technologies, launches its latest, innovative flagship product Deep Reality Viewer (DRV-Z1) microscope. more
Ziath launches new YouTube channel to share its expertise with laboratories  NEWS MEDICAL · 1 week
Ziath is launching a new YouTube channel that will house informative videos previewing the latest innovations in the field of drug discovery and bio-banking sample management... more
Air Force soliciting bids for small, medium satellite launch program  SPACE NEWS · 1 week
OSP-4 is designed to accommodate payloads greater than 400 lbs. The Air Force projects it will... more
These Experimental Shorts Are An 'Exosuit' That Boosts Endurance On The Trail  NPR · 1 week
No ordinary pair of shorts, these were designed by Harvard scientists to work with the wearer's own leg muscles when walking or running, and... more
Drug interaction research: Evolution clues  SCIENCE DAILY · 1 week
A new article has shown that a key biological component in the communication system of the nematode C. Elegans can be repurposed to take on a different job,. This critical finding about the workings of evolution could one... more
Teosinte ligule allele narrows plant architecture and enhances high-density maize yields  Science Magazine · 1 week
Increased planting densities have boosted maize yields. Upright plant architecture facilitates dense planting. Here, we cloned UPA1 (Upright Plant Architecture1) and UPA2, two quantitative trait loci... more
In product design, imagining end user's feelings leads to more original outcomes  PHYS.ORG · 1 week
Developing original and innovative products is critical to a company's long-term success and competitive advantage. Thus, gaining a better idea of what factors impact... more
To boldly go, again!  ESA · 1 week
The award-winning Space Rocks returns to the indigo at The O2 in London on 21 September for another celebration of space science and engineering, along with the art,... more
An autonomous vehicle coupled with a robotic laboratory proves its worth  PHYS.ORG · 1 week
Every drop of seawater contains thousands of cells that can reveal the diversity of life in our ocean. Using a self-contained robotic laboratory and an autonomous... more
Biosensor can detect a small presence of salmonella in food in just hours  PHYS.ORG · 1 week
When food is recalled due to contamination from bacteria such as salmonella, one may wonder how a tainted product ended up on... more
Researchers build cannon to test seals in coal mines  PHYS.ORG · 1 week
Mining and explosives engineering researchers at Missouri S&T began testing concrete seals used to close coal mine tunnels this month by loading a cannon with projectiles, shooting them at the... more
New cloaking devices could hide objects from water waves and currents  SCIENCE-NEWS · 1 week
Specially designed materials could help prevent boats from rocking too violently in harbors, researchers say. more
Helping bacteria be better friends  SCIENCE DAILY · 1 week
Bacteria, like people, have complicated relationships. A group of researchers was able to engineer the genomes of 4 species of gut bacteria to make them rely on each other for essential nutrients rather than competing for them, and... more
Engineering multiple bacterial strains reverses antagonistic interactions and results in more balanced consortia  PHYS.ORG · 1 week
Bacteria, like people, have complicated relationships: they can either be friendly, neutral, or antagonistic toward each other, and those relationships can change... more
BRAF inhibitors promote intermediate BRAF(V600E) conformations and binary interactions with activated RAS  Science Magazine · 1 week
Oncogenic BRAF mutations initiate tumor formation by unleashing the autoinhibited kinase conformation and promoting RAS-decoupled proliferative RAF-MEK-ERK signaling. We have engineered luciferase-based biosensors to... more
Noninvasive monitoring of chronic kidney disease using pH and perfusion imaging  Science Magazine · 1 week
Chronic Kidney Disease (CKD) is a cardinal feature of methylmalonic acidemia (MMA), a prototypic organic acidemia. Impaired growth, low activity, and protein restriction affect muscle mass... more
Engineered collagen-binding serum albumin as a drug conjugate carrier for cancer therapy  Science Magazine · 1 week
Serum albumin (SA) is used as a carrier to deliver cytotoxic agents to tumors via passive targeting. To further improve SA’s tumor targeting capacity,... more
Drug-encapsulated carbon (DECON): A novel platform for enhanced drug delivery  Science Magazine · 1 week
Current drug-delivery systems are designed primarily for parenteral applications and are either lipid or polymer drug conjugates. In our quest to inhibit herpes simplex virus infection via the... more
Study shows positive lab environment critical for undergraduate success in research  PHYS.ORG · 1 week
Getting involved in research as an undergraduate can have significant benefits, such as enhancing a student's ability to think critically, increasing their understanding of how to... more
Physical and mental exercise lower chances for developing delirium after surgery  SCIENCE DAILY · 1 week
A team of researchers has designed a study to see whether older adults who are physically active before having surgery had less delirium after surgery. The... more
New drug shows encouraging survival in pancreatic cancer  SCIENCE DAILY · 1 week
A phase 1 clinical trial testing a new drug in pancreatic cancer had promising initial results, report researchers. The trial looked at AZD1775, an inhibitor designed to block an enzyme called Wee1,... more
Breakthrough in understanding of magnetic monopoles could signal new technologies  SCIENCE DAILY · 1 week
A breakthrough in understanding how the quasi-particles known as magnetic monopoles behave could lead to the development of new technologies to replace electric charges. more
Breakthrough in understanding of magnetic monopoles could signal new technologies  PHYS.ORG · 1 week
A breakthrough in understanding how the quasi-particles known as magnetic monopoles behave could lead to the development of new technologies to replace electric charges. more
Greener, faster and cheaper way to make patterned metals for solar cells and electronics  SCIENCE DAILY · 1 week
An innovative way to pattern metals could make the next generation of solar panels more sustainable and cheaper. more
Shard reveals how Cyprus' ancient kingdoms managed economy  PHYS.ORG · 1 week
An archaeologist says the discovery of a small clay shard inscribed with a partial inventory of goods at a 2,500-year-old citadel suggests that Cyprus' ancient city states "more than likely" managed their... more
Abnormal blood pressure in middle and late life influences dementia risk  SCIENCE DAILY · 1 week
In a study that spanned two and a half decades and looked at data from more than 4,700 participants, researchers have added to evidence that abnormal... more
Assessing the strengths of solar thermal desalination  nanowerk · 1 week
Researchers propose an elegant theoretical framework to help others in the field better understand how various technological innovations can enhance solar thermal desalination (STD) performance. The framework is summed up in a straightforward equation... more
Greener, faster and cheaper way to make patterned metals for solar cells and electronics  PHYS.ORG · 1 week
An innovative way to pattern metals has been discovered by scientists in the Department of Chemistry at the University of... more
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