Education
Study finds modest decrease in burnout among physicians  NEWS MEDICAL · 9 minutes
The epidemic levels of physicians reporting burnout dropped modestly in 2017, according to a study by researchers at the Stanford University School of Medicine, the Mayo Clinic and the American Medical Association. more
New International Moon/Mars Mission Launched at HI-SEAS Habitat  ASTRO WATCH · 6 hours
A two-week mission to perform scientific experiments and test technological instruments needed for the future exploration of the Moon or... more
Team in monsoon research breakthrough  PHYS.ORG · 10 hours
With average precipitation of 35 inches per four-month season over an area encompassing most of the Indian subcontinent, the South Asia summer monsoon is intense, only partly understood, and notoriously difficult to predict. Until now, according to findings... more
Researchers engineer a tougher fiber  PHYS.ORG · 10 hours
North Carolina State University researchers have developed a fiber that combines the elasticity of rubber with the strength of a metal, resulting in a tougher material that could be incorporated into soft robotics, packaging materials or next-generation textiles. more
Good dog? Bad dog? Their personalities can change  PHYS.ORG · 12 hours
When dog-parents spend extra time scratching their dogs' bellies, take their dogs out for long walks and games of fetch, or even when they feel constant frustration over their dogs' naughty chewing... more
Study of human impact on food webs and ecosystems yields unexpected insights  PHYS.ORG · 14 hours
When the Australian government relocated Martu hunter-gatherers from their Western Australia lands in the 1960s, no one could have predicted the massive impact their... more
Research highlights the impact of the recession on stress within families  PHYS.ORG · 14 hours
Growing Up in Ireland publishes a new report on the lives of children who were 3 years old in the middle of the Great Recession. The... more
Studying species interactions using remote camera traps  PHYS.ORG · 14 hours
Species are often involved in complex interactions with other species, which can affect their occurrence, abundance, feeding habits and disease transmission. Observing and studying species interactions can be difficult. To circumvent this problem, ecologists... more
Researchers get to the bottom of fairy circles  PHYS.ORG · 14 hours
Fairy circles are round gaps in arid grassland that are distributed very uniformly over the landscape and only occur along the Namib Desert in southern Africa and in parts of Australia. Various... more
Pharmaceutical residues in fresh water pose a growing environmental risk  PHYS.ORG · 15 hours
Over the past 20 years, concentrations of pharmaceuticals have increased in freshwater sources all over the world, as research by environmental experts at Radboud University has revealed. Levels... more
New instrument unravels landscape longevity  PHYS.ORG · 15 hours
How many years can a mountain exist? Bob Dylan's rhetorical question has just received yet another scientifically based answer. Researchers from Wageningen University & Research (WUR) and Denmark's Technical University (DTU) have developed a new method that can... more
A way to use a two-nickel catalyst to synthesize cyclopentenes  PHYS.ORG · 15 hours
A pair of researchers at Purdue University has found a way to use a diatomic Ni-Ni catalyst to synthesize cyclopentenes. In their paper published in the journal Science,... more
A nonvolatile spintronics-based 50uW microcontroller unit operating at 200MHz  PHYS.ORG · 16 hours
Researchers at Tohoku University have announced the development of a nonvolatile microcontroller unit (MCU) which achieves both high performance and ultra-low power by utilizing spintronics-based VLSI design technology. more
Physicists train the oscillatory neural network to recognize images  PHYS.ORG · 16 hours
Physicists from Petrozavodsk State University have proposed a new method for oscillatory neural network to recognize simple images. Such networks with an adjustable synchronous state of individual neurons have, presumably,... more
Preventing the production of toxic mitochondrial proteins—a promising treatment target  PHYS.ORG · 16 hours
Researchers at the University of Helsinki uncovered the mechanisms for a novel cellular stress response arising from the toxicity of newly synthesized proteins. Activation of the stress response... more
LO­FAR Ra­dio Tele­scope Re­veals Secrets of Solar Storms  ASTRO WATCH · 18 hours
An international team of scientists led by a researcher from Trinity College Dublin and University of Helsinki announced a major... more
UVA scientist receives $1 million award to map out submicroscopic world  NEWS MEDICAL · 21 hours
A scientist at the University of Virginia School of Medicine has received a prestigious three-year, $1 million award from the William M. Keck Foundation to develop... more
$1.5 million grant to develop opioid treatment program for jail detainees  NEWS MEDICAL · 21 hours
In what could serve as a model for tackling one of the nation's top public health crises, a University of Massachusetts Amherst epidemiology researcher is teaming... more
CPRIT awards nearly $20 million to The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center  NEWS MEDICAL · 21 hours
The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center today was awarded $19.6 million from the Cancer Prevention and Research Institute... more
Triclosan added to consumer products impairs response to antibiotic treatment  PHYS.ORG · 22 hours
Grocery store aisles are stocked with products that promise to kill bacteria. People snap up those items to protect themselves from the germs that make them sick. However,... more
Biologist uses new grant to find ways to eliminate schistosomiasis  NEWS MEDICAL · 22 hours
A biologist at The University of Texas at Arlington is using a new grant to look for ways to finish off a disease that has stubbornly resisted all... more
Breast cancer study: Family-history-based models perform better than non-family-history based models  NEWS MEDICAL · 22 hours
A team of researchers led by Columbia University Mailman School of Public Health Professor Mary Beth Terry, PhD, evaluated four commonly used breast cancer prediction models... more
First motor-controlled heart valves implanted by Mainz University Medical Center  NEWS MEDICAL · 22 hours
Patients of the Mainz University Medical Center with heart valve disease have recently been able to benefit from a new treatment option for a narrowed aortic valve. more
Study shows almost two-thirds of U.S. children live in asset poverty  NEWS MEDICAL · 22 hours
More than 63 percent of American children and 55 percent of Americans live in "asset" poverty, meaning they have few or no assets to rely on... more
Transparency on healthcare prices played key role in Arizona health system's turnaround  NEWS MEDICAL · 22 hours
Efforts to understand costs and openly share information on healthcare prices played a key role in a major Arizona health system's successful turnaround from... more
Onset of puberty depends on gap between parents' and child's height  NEWS MEDICAL · 22 hours
Ben-Gurion University of the Negev researchers have found that the age puberty hits is based on the gap between the parents' and child's ultimate height, not... more
Frog-skin bacteria more diverse in cold and variable temperature regions, finds study  NEWS MEDICAL · 24 hours
Amphibians are victims of lethal skin-disease epidemics. In the first global-scale study, researchers from 31 universities and research centers, including the Smithsonian Tropical Research... more
Study: Women with more social support have low risk of dying  NEWS MEDICAL · 24 hours
Women aged 50-79 who believed they had more social support were less likely to die during the course of the study, according to a new study... more
Newly designed molecule could benefit people with Friedrich's Ataxia  NEWS MEDICAL · 1 day
Skin cells taken from patients with a rare genetic disorder are up to ten times more sensitive to damage from ultraviolet A radiation in laboratory tests, than those from a... more
New blood test detects genetic disorders in fetuses  NEWS MEDICAL · 1 day
Tel Aviv University researchers have developed a new blood test for genetic disorders that may allow parents to learn about the health of their baby as early as 11 weeks into pregnancy. more
Mitochondrial proteotoxicity appears to be epicentre of molecular pathogenesis  NEWS MEDICAL · 1 day
Researchers at the University of Helsinki uncovered the mechanisms for a novel cellular stress response arising from the toxicity of newly synthesized proteins. more
Study doesn’t find enough evidence related to effects of noncaloric sweeteners on gut microbiota  NEWS MEDICAL · 1 day
The study, carried out by the UGR professor of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology Ángel Gil and his research team, has... more
New method helps quantify very low concentrations of neonicotinoid pesticides in honey  NEWS MEDICAL · 1 day
Researchers from the University of Neuchâtel, Switzerland have developed an ultra-sensitive method to quantify extremely low concentrations of neonicotinoid pesticides in honey. more
With nanopore sensing, physics researchers detect subtle changes in single particles  PHYS.ORG · 1 day
Researchers in Virginia Commonwealth University's Department of Physics have discovered that a technique known as nanopore sensing can be used to detect subtle changes in clusters,... more
DeepSqueak: Deep Learning-Based System Decodes Rodent Chatter  SCI-NEWS.COM · 1 day
Deep learning has recently revolutionized the field of machine hearing and vision, by allowing computers to perform human-like activities including seeing, listening,... more
Genetic defect linked to pediatric liver disease identified  NEWS MEDICAL · 1 day
Researchers from the University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus, in collaboration with several other institutions, have discovered a genetic defect linked to Biliary atresia, the most common pediatric cause of end-stage liver... more
Unhealthy diet linked to poor mental health  NEWS MEDICAL · 1 day
A study has found that poor mental health is linked with poor diet quality -- regardless of personal characteristics such as gender age, education, age, marital status and income level. more
Study finds motor skills problems in children exposed during pregnancy to plasticizer chemicals  NEWS MEDICAL · 1 day
Scientists with the Columbia Center for Children's Environmental Health at the Columbia University Mailman School of Public Health report motor skills problems... more
New biochemical pathway that may develop more resilient crop varieties  PHYS.ORG · 1 day
Researchers from the Department of Plant Sciences, University of Oxford, have discovered a new biochemical pathway in plants which they have named CHLORAD. more
How bird feather patterns form  PHYS.ORG · 1 day
Feathers evolved in dinosaurs and are a key characteristic of birds today. They are arranged in a precise hexagonal pattern in a bird's skin, but it has been unclear how this happens. According to a new study published... more
Study: Teacher retention bonuses lead to positive results  PHYS.ORG · 1 day
Offering teachers a retention bonus to stay at low-performing schools may increase test score gains among students in both reading and mathematics, according to a new study. more
Dermal disruption: Amphibian skin bacteria is more diverse in cold, variable environments  PHYS.ORG · 1 day
Amphibians are victims of lethal skin-disease epidemics. In the first global-scale study, researchers from 31 universities and research centers, including the Smithsonian Tropical Research... more
Believing in yourself can backfire when investing in equity crowdfunded ventures  PHYS.ORG · 1 day
Normally, it's good to believe in yourself. But research from Indiana University's Kelley School of Business indicates that it can be bad advice for amateurs investing... more
Pioneering study could offer protection to patients with rare genetic disease  PHYS.ORG · 1 day
Skin cells taken from patients with a rare genetic disorder are up to ten times more sensitive to damage from ultraviolet A (AVA) radiation in laboratory... more
The 'Laminar Express': Engineers dissect the two-seam fastball  PHYS.ORG · 1 day
The worlds of engineering and baseball have collided. Researchers at Utah State University are breaking down the physics of a new baseball pitch that's been getting a lot of attention. more
Antibody therapy training phagocytes to destroy tumors now tested on patients  SCIENCE DAILY · 2 days
An immunotherapeutic antibody therapy re-educates macrophages to activate passivated cytotoxic T cells to kill cancer. The antibody therapy prevented the growth of tumours in several mouse... more
Food industry waste becomes profitable biogas  PHYS.ORG · 2 days
Huge gains can be made by using waste from the food industry for biogas production, no matter whether the biogas is used in vehicles or to produce electricity and heat. This is the conclusion of researchers... more
Radio-tracking dolphins reveals intimate details about their behavior  PHYS.ORG · 2 days
Using telemetry units in hospitals to monitor patient health is standard practice. Now, a similar approach is proving to be invaluable for dolphins, too. Researchers from Florida Atlantic University's Harbor Branch Oceanographic... more
Biodegradable Mardi Gras beads update  PHYS.ORG · 2 days
LSU Department of Biological Sciences Professor Naohiro Kato is refining the process to make biodegradable Mardi Gras beads. He has patent applications pending on various formulations and methods of making the biodegradable beads that could help prevent tens... more
Evening exercise does not negatively affect sleep, may also reduce hunger  NEWS MEDICAL · 2 days
Must cook dinner. Need to pick the kids up from school. Have to catch up on my favorite TV series. Live too far from the gym.... more
Applying computational chemistry to simulate realistic chemical processes  PHYS.ORG · 2 days
The waters of science are muddy these days—especially at the University of California San Diego where all that separates a chemist from a physicist in some cases is office drywall. Chemists ask... more
Nearly two-thirds of American children live in asset poverty, new study shows  PHYS.ORG · 2 days
More than 63 percent of American children and 55 percent of Americans live in "asset" poverty, meaning they have few or no assets to... more
Automated speed enforcement doesn't just reduce collisions—it helps reduce crime  PHYS.ORG · 2 days
It's widely accepted that automated photo enforcement programs targeting speeding help reduce collisions and promote safe driving. Now a new University of British Columbia study suggests they can... more
Cell division in plants: How cell walls are assembled  PHYS.ORG · 2 days
Plant researchers at Martin Luther University Halle-Wittenberg (MLU) are providing new insights into basic cell division in plants. The scientists have succeeded in understanding how pivotal processes are coordinated in... more
Surprising findings on forest fires  PHYS.ORG · 2 days
Lake Van in eastern Turkey is considered a unique climate archive. Several years ago, an international team of scientists led by the University of Bonn raised sediments from the bottom of the lake reflecting the past 600,000 years.... more
Intensive therapy during early stages of MS leads to better long-term outcomes  NEWS MEDICAL · 2 days
New findings by researchers at Cardiff University suggest that intensive therapy during the early stages of multiple sclerosis (MS) leads to better long-term outcomes... more
Worrying long-term stability of pesticides in honey  PHYS.ORG · 2 days
Researchers from the University of Neuchâtel, Switzerland have developed an ultra-sensitive method to quantify extremely low concentrations of neonicotinoid pesticides in honey. This is a follow up to their study on the global contamination... more
A qualitative model to describe microscopic 'jumps' by adhesive tape unwinding from a roll  PHYS.ORG · 2 days
A team of researchers from Universite de Lyon and Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique has developed a qualitative model... more
Coastal waters are unexpected hotspots for nitrogen fixation  PHYS.ORG · 2 days
Nitrogen fixation is surprisingly high in coastal waters and may play a larger role than expected in carbon dioxide (CO2) uptake in these waters, a new study led by Duke University scientists... more
Bacteria can survive starvation in zombie mode  PHYS.ORG · 2 days
Bacteria that are exposed to a hostile environment, for example with antibiotics or very few nutrients, can sometimes survive by 'going to sleep." Biologists from the University of Amsterdam (UvA) have discovered an unknown,... more
A volcanic binge and its frosty hangover  PHYS.ORG · 2 days
A major volcanic event could have triggered one of the largest glaciations in Earth's history—the Gaskiers glaciation, which turned the Earth into a giant snowball approximately 580 million years ago. Researchers from Heidelberg University... more
New mechanisms regulating neural stem cells  PHYS.ORG · 2 days
The use of stem cells to repair organs is one of the foremost goals of modern regenerative medicine. Scientists at Helmholtz Zentrum München and Ludwig Maximilian University of Munich (LMU) have discovered that the protein Akna... more
Scientists uncover new mechanisms regulating neural stem cells  NEWS MEDICAL · 2 days
The use of stem cells to repair organs is one of the foremost goals of modern regenerative medicine. Scientists at Helmholtz Zentrum München and Ludwig Maximilian University of Munich have discovered that... more
Ignaz Semmelweis' statue unveiled at MedUni Vienna  NEWS MEDICAL · 2 days
The 200th anniversary of Ignaz Semmelweis' birth was commemorated on 1 July 2018. On Wednesday evening, a statue of the doctor, kindly donated by Semmelweis University Budapest, was unveiled at MedUni Vienna, in memory... more
Disadvantaged boys benefit most from early school years  PHYS.ORG · 2 days
Boys from disadvantaged backgrounds benefit most from early schooling, helping to narrow the skills gap with boys from high socio-economic backgrounds, according to new research. more
New study—how to save a seabird  PHYS.ORG · 2 days
In the 1990s, the endangered status of the short-tailed albatross catalyzed efforts to reduce the number of birds accidentally killed as bycatch in Alaska, home to the country's biggest fisheries. Marine fisheries scientist Ed Melvin, at... more
Serendipity reveals sex bias in embryo development  PHYS.ORG · 2 days
New published research from the College of Veterinary Medicine shows that heightened levels of genomic instability can prove fatal to female embryos in mice. more
Complete world map of tree diversity  PHYS.ORG · 2 days
Biodiversity is one of Earth's most precious resources. However, for most places in the world, scientists only have a tiny picture of what this diversity actually is. Researchers at the German Centre for Integrative Biodiversity Research... more
'Butterfly-shaped' palladium subnano cluster built in 3-D  PHYS.ORG · 2 days
Miniaturization is the watchword of progress. Nanoscience, studying structures on the scale of a few atoms, has been at the forefront of chemistry for some time now. Recently, researchers at the University of Tokyo... more
New therapeutic approach to combat African sleeping sickness  PHYS.ORG · 2 days
Scientists working in a range of disciplines joined forces to identify a new approach to combat African sleeping sickness. Fundamental research undertaken under the supervision of Professor Ute Hellmich of Johannes Gutenberg... more
Female golden snub-nosed monkeys share nursing of young  PHYS.ORG · 2 days
An international team of researchers including The University of Western Australia and China's Central South University of Forestry and Technology has discovered that female golden snub-nosed monkeys in China are happy to... more
New technology measures hormones that influence reproductive health efficiently  NEWS MEDICAL · 2 days
The technology, developed by researchers at Imperial College London and The University of Hong Kong, can be used to measure hormones that affect fertility, sexual development and menstruation more quickly... more
Study finds new genetic clues associated with asthma in African ancestry populations  NEWS MEDICAL · 2 days
In the largest study of its kind, researchers at the University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus have found new clues into the parts of... more
NIST ‘Astrocomb’ Opens New Horizons for Planet-Hunting Telescope  ASTRO WATCH · 2 days
The hunt for Earth-like planets, and perhaps extraterrestrial life, just got more precise, thanks to record-setting starlight measurements made possible... more
New robotic sensor technology can diagnose reproductive health problems in real-time  PHYS.ORG · 2 days
The technology, developed by researchers at Imperial College London and The University of Hong Kong, can be used to measure hormones that affect fertility, sexual development... more
Scientists demonstrate key role of salt in allergic immune reactions  NEWS MEDICAL · 2 days
Salt apparently affects allergic immune reactions. A team working with Prof. Christina Zielinski at the Technical University of Munich has demonstrated in cell cultures that salt leads to... more
Lesbian and bisexual women at greater risk of being overweight, study finds  NEWS MEDICAL · 2 days
Lesbian and bisexual women are at increased risk of being overweight or obese compared to heterosexual women, according to new research from the University... more
Researchers discover DNA modification that enhances our ability to extinguish fear  NEWS MEDICAL · 2 days
Researchers at The University of Queensland have discovered a DNA modification that enhances our ability to extinguish fear. more
Researchers unlock the secret behind reproduction of fish called ‘Mary’  NEWS MEDICAL · 2 days
A female stickleback fish, nick-named 'Mary', has produced offspring from eggs that appear to have been fertilized while they were still inside her, according to scientists at the... more
Viruses in the intestinal tracts can lead to islet autoimmunity and Type 1 diabetes  NEWS MEDICAL · 2 days
Researchers at the Center for Infection and Immunity at the Columbia University Mailman School of Public Health and the University... more
Research finds steep rise in self-poisonings among young people  NEWS MEDICAL · 2 days
Self-harm from self-poisoning in children and adolescents is not only increasing but starting at a younger age, finds new research by University of Sydney and the NSW Poisons Information Centre. more
Extinguishing fear memories relies on an unusual change to DNA  SCIENCE DAILY · 2 days
Researchers have discovered a DNA modification that enhances our ability to extinguish fear. The findings could help guide the development of new treatments for fear-related anxiety disorders. Professor... more
Yea, team! Winning fans see self-esteem boost  SCIENCE DAILY · 2 days
Fans of a college football team that wins a big game could experience a boost in self-esteem that lasts at least two days after the event, a new study suggests. more
WATCH: James Charles loves gym class  ABC NEWS · 2 days
Michael, Sara and James debate the pros and cons of having PE class in school. more
BGU develops new AI platform for monitoring and predicting ALS progression  NEWS MEDICAL · 2 days
Ben-Gurion University of the Negev has developed a new artificial intelligence (AI) platform for monitoring and predicting progression of neurodegenerative diseases to help identify markers for... more
UQ research may explain why vitamin D is essential for brain health  NEWS MEDICAL · 2 days
University of Queensland research may explain why vitamin D is vital for brain health, and how deficiency leads to disorders including depression and schizophrenia. more
Immunotherapeutic antibody therapy to kill cancer has now progressed to patient testing  NEWS MEDICAL · 2 days
Developed by researchers at the University of Turku in Finland, an immunotherapeutic antibody therapy re-educates macrophages to activate passivated cytotoxic T cells to kill... more
Scientists join forces to identify a new approach to fight African sleeping sickness  NEWS MEDICAL · 3 days
Scientists working in a range of disciplines joined forces to identify a new approach to combat African sleeping sickness. Fundamental research undertaken... more
New nurses work overtime, long shifts, and sometimes a second job  SCIENCE DAILY · 3 days
New nurses are predominantly working 12-hour shifts and nearly half work overtime, trends that have remained relatively stable over the past decade, finds a new study... more
Carbon Capture and Storage project publishes findings  PHYS.ORG · 3 days
The ACT Acorn project, an international research project which involves University geology experts, has announced the findings of its research into the feasibility of establishing a carbon capture and storage facility in the North... more
Earliest example of animal nest sharing revealed by scientists  PHYS.ORG · 3 days
An international team of scientists, including researchers from the University of Southampton, has shown that fossilised eggshells unearthed in western Romania represent the earliest known nest site shared by multiple... more
National parks are beautiful, but austerity and inequality prevent many from enjoying them  PHYS.ORG · 3 days
Spending time in nature is good for you. A person's access to parks and green, open spaces is important for their health,... more
Foreign bees monopolize prize resources in biodiversity hotspot  PHYS.ORG · 3 days
Hike around the natural habitats of San Diego County and it becomes abundantly clear that honey bees, foreign to the area, are everywhere. In a study published last year, researchers at the... more
Fabric the reinforcer  PHYS.ORG · 3 days
Scientists from the National University of Science and Technology (MISIS) have tested experimental composite materials for aircraft brakes, developed by PJSC Aviation Corporation "Rubin." New materials, reinforced by carbon "fabric," have turned out to be far more durable than the... more
Make CEOs join the same pension scheme as staff to help protect it, say experts  PHYS.ORG · 3 days
Making company bosses join the same defined benefit scheme as their staff makes it more likely the scheme... more
Should you feed wild birds in winter?  PHYS.ORG · 3 days
Nothing brightens a yard like a flock of twittering birds, and nothing draws them like a free meal—but it's an open question whether bird feeders are good for them or not, says a University... more
Q&A: Why cities aren’t working for the working class  MIT · 3 days
Professor David Autor’s latest research shows how economic polarization stems from urban job loss. more
Beauty is in the algorithm of the beholder  PHYS.ORG · 3 days
Manal El Rhazi, Arsalane Zarghili, Aicha Majda, and Anissa Bouzalmat of the Intelligent Systems and Applications Laboratory at Sidi Mohamed Ben Abdellah University, in Fez, Morocco, together with Ayat Allah Oufkir of... more
Studying species interactions using remote camera traps
PHYS.ORG
Preventing the production of toxic mitochondrial proteins—a promising treatment target
PHYS.ORG
Prenatal forest fire exposure stunts children's growth
PHYS.ORG
School climate strikes: What next for the latest generation of activists?
PHYS.ORG
World's finest gold specimen probed with Los Alamos neutrons
PHYS.ORG
3-D printed nanomaterial shows different transparencies and colours
PHYS.ORG
We've discovered the world's largest drum – and it's in space
PHYS.ORG
Heartbreak becomes burnout for teachers when work is turbulent
PHYS.ORG
Video: Planetary scientist talks about her work with NASA studying asteroid Bennu
PHYS.ORG
Robbie the Robot becomes soap fan after watching Emmerdale to learn about dementia
PHYS.ORG
Mosquitoes can hear from longer distances than previously thought
PHYS.ORG
Video: What do adults lose when they stop engaging in competitive play?
PHYS.ORG
Scientists discover new type of self-healing material
PHYS.ORG
Science key to taking the pulse of our planet
ESA
Nano-sized diamond will improve materials for maritime transport
PHYS.ORG
UC design could revolutionize power plants
PHYS.ORG
Want a successful Super Bowl ad? Don't make people think
PHYS.ORG
Physicists create exotic electron liquid
PHYS.ORG
UH marine mammal research captures rare video of newborn humpback whale
PHYS.ORG
AI challenged to pinpoint state of drifting satellites
ESA
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