Biology
How allergens in pollen help plants do more than make you sneeze  SCIENCE-NEWS · 1 hour
A plant’s view of what humans call allergens in pollen grains involves a lot of crucial biology. And sex. more
Medical News Today: How a parasitic fish could help us fight brain cancer and stroke  MNT · 5 hours
New research in mice suggests that molecules derived from a species of parasitic fish could help tackle cancer... more
How a parasitic fish could help us fight brain cancer and stroke  MNT · 5 hours
New research in mice suggests that molecules derived from a species of parasitic fish could help tackle cancer and other conditions in the brain. more
Previous dengue infection could protect against Zika-associated damage  NEWS MEDICAL · 16 hours
The Zika virus outbreak in Latin America has affected over 60 million people up to now. The infection can have potentially fatal consequences for pregnant women and their unborn children: many children... more
Medical News Today: Augmentin (Amoxicillin/clavulanate potassium)  MNT · 2 days
Augmentin (amoxicillin/clavulanate potassium) is a prescription medication that’s used to treat infections caused by bacteria. It belongs to a class of drugs called penicillin antibiotics. Augmentin comes as an oral tablet and an oral liquid suspension.... more
Clinical trial improves treatment of genetic rickets  SCIENCE DAILY · 2 days
A new study shows a drug to alleviate symptoms of a rare musculoskeletal condition is significantly more effective than conventional therapies. more
Nanoscale sculpturing leads to unusual packing of nanocubes  nanowerk · 2 days
Cube-shaped nanoparticles with thick shells of DNA assemble into a never-before-seen 3-D 'zigzag' pattern that breaks orientational symmetry; understanding such nanoscale behavior is key to engineering new materials with desired organizations and... more
Nanoscale sculpturing leads to unusual packing of nanocubes  PHYS.ORG · 2 days
From the ancient pyramids to modern buildings, various three-dimensional (3-D) structures have been formed by packing shaped objects together. At the macroscale, the shape of objects is fixed and thus dictates how... more
Researchers unravel mechanistic origin of cell-size control  NEWS MEDICAL · 2 days
Working with bacteria, a multidisciplinary team at the University of California San Diego has provided new insight into a longstanding question in science: What are the underlying mechanisms that control the size of cells? more
Dangerous pathogens use this sophisticated machinery to infect hosts  PHYS.ORG · 2 days
Gastric cancer, Q fever, Legionnaires' disease, whooping cough—though the infectious bacteria that cause these dangerous diseases are each different, they all utilize the same molecular machinery to infect human cells.... more
Metals influence C-peptide hormone related to insulin  SCIENCE DAILY · 2 days
Metals such as zinc, copper and chromium bind to and influence a peptide involved in insulin production, according to new work. The research is part of a new field of 'metalloendocrinology' that takes a... more
Early dengue virus infection could 'defuse' zika virus  SCIENCE DAILY · 2 days
The Zika virus outbreak in Latin America has affected over 60 million people up to now. The infection can have potentially fatal consequences for pregnant women and their unborn children: many children... more
Museum volunteers discover new species of extinct heron at North Florida fossil site  SCIENCE DAILY · 2 days
When the bones of an ancient heron were unearthed at a North Florida fossil site, the find wasn't made by researchers but... more
Gut microbiome diversity can be explained by dietary habits and evolution history  NEWS MEDICAL · 2 days
What determines the composition of microorganisms in the digestive tract of animals? A large study by the Vienna University of Technology and the Karl... more
New model captures flexibility of working memory  NEWS MEDICAL · 2 days
A new article in Neuron from Princeton University neuroscientists Flora Bouchacourt and Tim Buschman presents a new model of working memory. more
Chimps Use Tools to Excavate Underground Food, Study Says  SCI-NEWS.COM · 2 days
Naïve chimpanzees are able to spontaneously use tools in order to excavate underground food, according to a new... more
Ernst Haeckel: Pioneer of modern science  SCIENCE DAILY · 2 days
Evolutionary biologist Ernst Haeckel became the first person to define the term ecology in his work published in 1866, entitled 'General Morphology of Organisms'. Science historians and biologists have now worked out just how close his... more
A lipid-encapsulated mRNA encoding a potently neutralizing human monoclonal antibody protects against chikungunya infection  Science Magazine · 2 days
Infection with chikungunya virus (CHIKV) causes an acute illness characterized by fever, rash, and arthralgia. However, CHIKV infection can sometimes... more
B cells engineered to express pathogen-specific antibodies protect against infection  Science Magazine · 2 days
Effective vaccines inducing lifelong protection against many important infections such as respiratory syncytial virus (RSV), HIV, influenza virus, and Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) are not yet available despite decades... more
Metals influence C-peptide hormone related to insulin  PHYS.ORG · 2 days
Metals such as zinc, copper and chromium bind to and influence a peptide involved in insulin production, according to new work from chemists at the University of California, Davis. The research is part of... more
Fuel subsidies defy green trend amid rising climate alarm  PHYS.ORG · 2 days
Even as warnings of climate catastrophe and calls for greener economies grow ever louder, the world is still spending hundreds of billions of dollars every year to subsidise the fossil... more
Scientists propose rethinking 'endangered species' definition to save slow-breeding giants  SCIENCE DAILY · 2 days
Conservation decisions based on population counts may fail to protect large, slow-breeding animals from irrevocable decline, according to new research. more
Owning a dog is influenced by our genetic make-up  SCIENCE DAILY · 2 days
Scientists have studied the heritability of dog ownership using information from 35,035 twin pairs from the Swedish Twin Registry. The new study suggests that genetic variation explains more than half... more
Researchers unravel mechanisms that control cell size  PHYS.ORG · 2 days
Working with bacteria, a multidisciplinary team at the University of California San Diego has provided new insight into a longstanding question in science: What are the underlying mechanisms that control the size of cells? more
Ernst Haeckel: Pioneer of modern science  PHYS.ORG · 2 days
"By ecology, we understand the whole science of the organism's relationship with the surrounding outside world, which includes in a broader sense all 'existential conditions'. These are partly organic and partly inorganic in nature; both the... more
Museum volunteers discover new species of extinct heron at North Florida fossil site  PHYS.ORG · 2 days
When the bones of an ancient heron were unearthed at a North Florida fossil site, the find wasn't made by researchers but... more
New computer program can help crack precision medicine  PHYS.ORG · 2 days
Researchers from ANU have helped develop a new computer program to find out a person's genetic make-up, bringing us a step closer to an era of precision medicine. more
Ocean twilight zone scientists tackle the challenge of bringing light into darkness  PHYS.ORG · 2 days
Oceanographers studying creatures in the ocean twilight zone are facing an optical dilemma. They need to observe the fish in order to study them,... more
Engineered microbial production of grape flavoring  PHYS.ORG · 2 days
Researchers report a microbial method for producing an artificial grape flavor. Methyl anthranilate (MANT) is a common grape flavoring and odorant compound currently produced through a petroleum-based process that uses large volumes of toxic acid catalysts. more
Wild wheat relative genes to aid in battle against trio of pests  PHYS.ORG · 2 days
Wheat curl mite, greenbug and Hessian fly have long been troublemaker pests for Texas wheat, but a team of Texas A&M AgriLife Research scientists... more
Study reveals role of neonatal brain cells in early bonding in mammals  PHYS.ORG · 2 days
What drives the social bond between offspring and caregivers in the first few days of life? A Yale-led team of researchers has found clues... more
Study dives deep into saving endangered shark  PHYS.ORG · 2 days
Mackerel sharks are large, fast-swimming apex predators that include Hollywood heavy-hitters like great whites (Jaws), mako (Deep Blue Sea) and the now-extinct Megalodon (The Meg). One of the smallest mackerel sharks is the porbeagle—on... more
A 'high-heeled' dinosaur that walked on its tiptoes  PHYS.ORG · 2 days
A 24-tonne dinosaur may have walked in a 'high-heeled' fashion, according to University of Queensland research. more
The USDA announces new vision for animal genomics  PHYS.ORG · 2 days
A new U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) blueprint, published today in Frontiers and Genetics, will serve as a guide for research and funding in animal genomics for 2018-2027 that will facilitate genomic... more
Dog ownership strongly linked to DNA make-up, says new study  NEWS MEDICAL · 2 days
A surprising new study shows that the difference in genetic blueprint explains more than 50% of the variation between those who choose to own dogs and those who... more
Vaccination helps protect the public from measles  NEWS MEDICAL · 2 days
The United States is experiencing its largest measles outbreak since the virus was eliminated in 2000. As of Monday, 839 cases of measles have been reported in 23 states, according to the Centers for... more
Scientists propose rethinking 'endangered species' definition to save slow-breeding giants  PHYS.ORG · 2 days
Conservation decisions based on population counts may fail to protect large, slow-breeding animals from irrevocable decline, according to new research coinciding with Endangered Species Day. more
Naturally occurring human antibody reveals hidden weakness in influenza virus  NEWS MEDICAL · 2 days
The ever-changing "head" of an influenza virus protein has an unexpected Achilles heel, report scientists funded by the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, one of the... more
Protecting rare species can benefit human life  PHYS.ORG · 3 days
Preserving rare species for the sake of global biodiversity has long been the primary focus for conservationists. more
Protecting rare species can benefit human life  SCIENCE DAILY · 3 days
Preserving rare species for the sake of global biodiversity has long been the primary focus for conservationists. To better protect rare animals, insects and plants, and to prepare for an uncertain future influenced by... more
Researchers identify first gene that predisposes to fainting  NEWS MEDICAL · 3 days
Fainting is not solely caused by external factors. Your genes also play a part. This has recently been documented by research team from the University of Copenhagen, Statens Serum Institut and Rigshospitalet. more
Brain changes in autism traced to specific cell types  SCIENCE DAILY · 3 days
Changes in gene activity in specific brain cells are associated with the severity of autism in children and young adults with the disorder, according to a new study. more
Designing biological movement on the nanometer scale  nanowerk · 3 days
Scientists have designed proteins that move in response to acid, a technology that could help medication enter cells. more
Scientists find new type of cell that helps tadpoles' tails regenerate  SCIENCE DAILY · 3 days
Researchers have uncovered a specialized population of skin cells that coordinate tail regeneration in frogs. These 'Regeneration-Organizing Cells' help to explain one of the great mysteries... more
Designing biological movement on the nanometer scale  SCIENCE DAILY · 3 days
Synthetic proteins have now been created that can move in response to their environment in predictable and tunable ways. These proteins can use their movement to disrupt lipid membranes in cells. They show promise... more
Natural compound found in broccoli reawakens the function of potent tumor suppressor  SCIENCE DAILY · 3 days
Long associated with decreased risk of cancer, broccoli and other cruciferous vegetables -- the family of plants that also includes cauliflower, cabbage, collard greens,... more
Stool transplant found safe and effective in children with C. difficile infections  NEWS MEDICAL · 3 days
Fecal microbiota transplant, or the transfer of stool from a healthy donor to a patient, has been found highly effective in reversing severe Clostridiodes... more
Could better tests help reverse the rise of drug-resistant infections?  SCIENCE DAILY · 3 days
Faster, more accurate tests for drug-resistant infections are hailed as a promising tool in the fight against antibiotic resistance, so much so that the US and Britain are... more
How host-cell enzymes combat the coronavirus  SCIENCE DAILY · 3 days
Host-cell enzymes called PARP12 and PARP14 are important for inhibiting mutant forms of a coronavirus, according to a new study. more
Mutation makes bulldogs and Norwich terriers more susceptible to breathing problems  SCIENCE DAILY · 3 days
The discovery of a new mutation associated with breathing difficulties in popular dog breeds suggests that shortened skulls causing flat faces is not the only factor... more
Identification of a regeneration-organizing cell in the Xenopus tail  Science Magazine · 3 days
Unlike mammals, Xenopus laevis tadpoles have a high regenerative potential. To characterize this regenerative response, we performed single-cell RNA sequencing after tail amputation. By comparing naturally occurring regeneration-competent and -incompetent... more
Local protein synthesis is a ubiquitous feature of neuronal pre- and postsynaptic compartments  Science Magazine · 3 days
There is ample evidence for localization of messenger RNAs (mRNAs) and protein synthesis in neuronal dendrites; however, demonstrations of these processes in... more
Single-cell genomics identifies cell type-specific molecular changes in autism  Science Magazine · 3 days
Despite the clinical and genetic heterogeneity of autism, bulk gene expression studies show that changes in the neocortex of autism patients converge on common genes and pathways. However, direct assessment... more
Quantum gas microscopy of Rydberg macrodimers  Science Magazine · 3 days
The subnanoscale size of typical diatomic molecules hinders direct optical access to their constituents. Rydberg macrodimers—bound states of two highly excited Rydberg atoms—feature interatomic distances easily exceeding optical wavelengths. We report the direct microscopic observation and... more
Constrained sialic acid donors enable selective synthesis of {alpha}-glycosides  Science Magazine · 3 days
Sialic acid is a sugar residue present in many biologically significant glycans of mammals, commonly as a terminal α-glycoside. The chemical structure of sialic acid, which features an anomeric center... more
De novo design of tunable, pH-driven conformational changes  Science Magazine · 3 days
The ability of naturally occurring proteins to change conformation in response to environmental changes is critical to biological function. Although there have been advances in the de novo design of stable proteins... more
Medical News Today: Could gut bacteria explain the link between stress and autoimmune disease?  MNT · 3 days
A mouse study shows that persistent social stress alters gut bacteria in ways that raise the likelihood of immune system... more
How host-cell enzymes combat the coronavirus  PHYS.ORG · 3 days
Host-cell enzymes called PARP12 and PARP14 are important for inhibiting mutant forms of a coronavirus, according to a study published May 16 in the open-access journal PLOS Pathogens by Stanley Perlman of the University of Iowa,... more
Scientists find new type of cell that helps tadpoles' tails regenerate  PHYS.ORG · 3 days
Researchers at the University of Cambridge have uncovered a specialised population of skin cells that coordinate tail regeneration in frogs. These 'Regeneration-Organizing Cells' help to explain... more
Designing biological movement on the nanometer scale  PHYS.ORG · 3 days
Synthetic proteins have been created that move in response to their environment in predictable and tunable ways. These motile molecules were designed from scratch on computers, then produced inside living cells. more
Could better tests help reverse the rise of drug-resistant infections?  PHYS.ORG · 3 days
A growing number of infections—such as pneumonia, gonorrhea and tuberculosis—are becoming harder to treat, as bacteria evolve defenses against antibiotics faster than we can develop new drugs to... more
Dog DNA find could aid quest to help breeds breathe more easily  PHYS.ORG · 3 days
Scientists have discovered a DNA mutation linked to breathing problems in popular dog breeds. more
Bloodthirsty bedbugs have feasted on prey for 100 million years  SCIENCE-NEWS · 3 days
Research sheds light on the evolutionary history of the bloodsucking bedbugs. The first species evolved at least as early as the Cretaceous, scientists say. more
Could gut bacteria explain the link between stress and autoimmune disease?  MNT · 3 days
A mouse study shows that persistent social stress alters gut bacteria in ways that raise the likelihood of immune system attacks on the body's own tissues. more
Malnourished fruit flies preserve genital size to ensure reproductive success  PHYS.ORG · 3 days
In most animals, body size shrinks when food becomes scarce, but some parts are protected from shrinkage. In humans without enough food, the body becomes small, but the... more
Study reports breakthrough to measure plant improvements to help farmers boost production  PHYS.ORG · 3 days
An international team is using advanced tools to develop crops that give farmers more options for sustainably producing more food on less land. To... more
Global invasion routes of the red swamp crayfish, described based on genetics  SCIENCE DAILY · 3 days
Researchers have identified the main introduction routes of the red swamp crayfish, Procambarus clarkii, during its global-scale invasion. This North American species is the... more
Bedbugs evolved more than 100 million years ago  SCIENCE DAILY · 3 days
Bedbugs -- some of the most unwanted human bed-mates -- have been parasitic companions with other species aside from humans for more than 100 million years, walking the earth at the same... more
Human antibody reveals hidden vulnerability in influenza virus  SCIENCE DAILY · 3 days
The ever-changing 'head' of an influenza virus protein has an unexpected Achilles heel, report scientists. The team discovered the structure of a naturally occurring human antibody that recognizes and disrupts a portion... more
Key step in cell protein production  SCIENCE DAILY · 3 days
Scientists have discovered how genes create proteins in research which could aid the development of treatments for human diseases. more
Warming climate threatens microbes in alpine streams  SCIENCE DAILY · 3 days
Changes to alpine streams fed by glaciers and snowfields due to a warming climate threaten to dramatically alter the types of bacteria and other microbes in those streams, according to new research. But streams... more
Atomic 'wave function': Research sheds new light  SCIENCE DAILY · 3 days
Physicists have demonstrated a new way to obtain the essential details of an isolated quantum system through direct observation. The method gives information about the likelihood of finding atoms at specific locations in the... more
Bio-inspired material targets oceans' uranium stores for sustainable nuclear energy  SCIENCE DAILY · 3 days
Scientists have demonstrated a new bio-inspired material for an eco-friendly and cost-effective approach to recovering uranium from seawater. The low-cost polymer adsorbent could help push past bottlenecks in... more
Antibody responses vs. Ebola keep evolving in survivors, months after recovery  SCIENCE DAILY · 3 days
Antiviral antibodies produced by survivors of Ebola infection continue to evolve and improve after recovery, according to a study of immune responses in four people who... more
Archaeological discovery upends a piece of Barbados history  PHYS.ORG · 3 days
Which came first, the pigs or the pioneers? In Barbados, that has been a historical mystery ever since the first English colonists arrived on the island in 1627 to encounter what they... more
The global invasion routes of the red swamp crayfish  PHYS.ORG · 3 days
Spanish National Research Council (CSIC) researchers have reconstructed the invasion routes followed by the red swamp crayfish during its human-driven expansion based on the analysis of a mitochondrial gene (COI),... more
Bio-inspired material targets oceans' uranium stores for sustainable nuclear energy  PHYS.ORG · 3 days
Scientists have demonstrated a new bio-inspired material for an eco-friendly and cost-effective approach to recovering uranium from seawater. more
Researchers shed new light on atomic 'wave function'  PHYS.ORG · 3 days
Physicists have demonstrated a new way to obtain the essential details that describe an isolated quantum system, such as a gas of atoms, through direct observation. The new method gives information about... more
Here’s What Could Happen If You Get Measles While Pregnant  LIVE SCIENCE · 3 days
The measles can be dangerous for people of all ages, but the highly contagious virus poses a particular threat to pregnant women. more
Fecal microbiota transplant found safe and effective in children with C. difficile  SCIENCE DAILY · 3 days
Fecal microbiota transplant (FMT), or the transfer of stool from a healthy donor to a patient, has been found effective in reversing severe, recurring... more
AlgaeDNAWhalesCRISPR
Researchers unravel mechanisms that control cell size
PHYS.ORG
Vaccination helps protect the public from measles
NEWS MEDICAL
Century-scale deep-water circulation dynamics in the North Atlantic Ocean
PHYS.ORG
A hydrogel that can stop bleeding from an artery
PHYS.ORG
Parents unknown—Mysterious larvae found in Panama's two oceans
PHYS.ORG
How is climate change affecting fishes? There are clues inside their ears
PHYS.ORG
The superheroes of nutrient detection living in our oceans
PHYS.ORG
Flu virus' best friend: Low humidity
SCIENCE DAILY
Dual-action 'slippery' catheter fights bacteria
PHYS.ORG
The revolution of plantoids
PHYS.ORG
Peering into the past, scientists discover bacteria transformed a viral threat to survive
PHYS.ORG
Researchers document the oldest known trees in eastern North America
PHYS.ORG
Cryptic mutation is cautionary tale for crop gene editing
PHYS.ORG
Radical desalination approach may disrupt the water industry
PHYS.ORG
Researcher investigates threats to coral and other ocean life
PHYS.ORG
Dealing with the absurdity of human existence in the face of converging catastrophes
PHYS.ORG
Scientists explore the evolution of animal homosexuality
PHYS.ORG
Hubble astronomers assemble wide view of the evolving universe
SCIENCE DAILY
A jawbone shows Denisovans lived on the Tibetan Plateau long before humans
SCIENCE-NEWS
Several small steps: Elephant calves caught on camera in Cambodia
PHYS.ORG
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