Biology
Making xylitol and cellulose nanofibers from paper paste  nanowerk · 1 hour
Researchers have demonstrated the ecological bio-production of xylitol and cellulose nanofibers using modified yeast cells, from material produced by the paper industry. more
Study shows how AI can improve physicians' diagnostic accuracy  NEWS MEDICAL · 4 hours
As artificial intelligence continues to evolve, diagnosing disease faster and potentially with greater accuracy than physicians, some have suggested that technology may soon replace tasks that physicians currently perform. more
Current HBV genome sequences help deduce ancient human population movements into Australia  NEWS MEDICAL · 4 hours
Australian researchers have used current hepatitis B virus (HBV) genome sequences to deduce ancient human population movements into Australia, adding weight to the theory... more
TGen and ABL sign agreement to distribute new TB test technology  NEWS MEDICAL · 5 hours
n an important step toward eradicating tuberculosis, the Translational Genomics Research Institute (TGen), an affiliate of City of Hope, has signed a licensing agreement with an... more
Excessive phosphate fertilizer may hurt plants by altering microbial composition in soil  NEWS MEDICAL · 5 hours
Phosphorus is crucial for plant growth--with it, plants can acquire, transfer, and store the energy that helps them flourish in full health. more
Dormant Viruses Activate During Spaceflight, NASA Investigates  ASTRO WATCH · 5 hours
Herpes viruses reactivate in more than half of crew aboard Space Shuttle and International Space Station missions, according to NASA research published... more
Food safety: Dung beetles and soil bacteria reduce risk of human pathogens  PHYS.ORG · 6 hours
Food safety regulations increasingly pressure growers to remove hedgerows, ponds and other natural habitats from farms to keep out pathogen-carrying wildlife and livestock. Yet,... more
Algal library lends insights into genes for photosynthesis  SCIENCE DAILY · 8 hours
To identify genes involved in photosynthesis, researchers built a library containing thousands of single-celled algae, each with a different gene mutation. The library, which took nine years to construct, has already helped... more
Mammals' unique arms started evolving before the dinosaurs existed  SCIENCE DAILY · 8 hours
One of the things that makes mammals special is our diverse forelimbs -- bat wings, whale flippers, gibbon arms, and cheetah legs have evolved to do different, specialized tasks. Scientists... more
Researchers create hydrogen fuel from seawater  SCIENCE DAILY · 8 hours
Splitting water into hydrogen and oxygen presents an alternative to fossil fuels, but purified water is a precious resource. A team has now developed a way to harness seawater -- Earth's most abundant source -- for... more
Fast-acting psychedelic associated with improvements in depression/anxiety  SCIENCE DAILY · 10 hours
Researchers have discovered that use of the synthetic psychedelic 5-methocy-N,-N-dimethyltryptamine (5-MeO-DMT) appears to be associated with unintended improvements in self-reported depression and anxiety when given in a ceremonial group setting. 5-MeO-DMT is a psychedelic... more
Researchers create hydrogen fuel from seawater  nanowerk · 10 hours
Splitting water into hydrogen and oxygen presents an alternative to fossil fuels, but purified water is a precious resource. A team has now developed a way to harness seawater - Earth's most abundant source - for... more
Google research shows how AI can make ophthalmologists more effective  SCIENCE DAILY · 11 hours
As artificial intelligence continues to evolve, diagnosing disease faster and potentially with greater accuracy than physicians, some have suggested that technology may soon replace tasks that physicians currently... more
Excessive phosphate fertilizer use can reduce microbial functions critical to crop health  SCIENCE DAILY · 11 hours
Scientists set out to determine if nutrient history changed the function of soil microorganisms. The answer seems to be yes, and that soil treated... more
Spaceflight Triggers Herpes Viruses to 'Reawaken'  LIVE SCIENCE · 13 hours
Being in outer space can have some odd effects on the body, including triggering dormant herpes viruses to reawaken. more
Bromethalin is poisoning the parrots of Telegraph Hill  PHYS.ORG · 13 hours
Bromethalin, a common rat poison, is the agent responsible for a neurological disease that has sickened or killed birds from a popular flock of naturalized parrots that reside primarily in the Telegraph... more
Giant squid gets makeover before showtime  PHYS.ORG · 13 hours
A little elbow grease, some formaldehyde, and a lot of ingenuity—that's what it took for taxidermists at the Museum of Natural History to prettify a giant squid along with a coelacanth, a rare fish known as... more
Algal library lends insights into genes for photosynthesis  PHYS.ORG · 14 hours
It isn't easy being green. It takes thousands of genes to build the photosynthetic machinery that plants need to harness sunlight for growth. And yet, researchers don't know exactly how these genes... more
Elephants: Earth's Largest Living Land-Animals  LIVE SCIENCE · 14 hours
With their big ears and long noses, the elephant is one of the most recognizable animals in the world. more
Mammals' unique arms started evolving before the dinosaurs existed  PHYS.ORG · 16 hours
Bats fly, whales swim, gibbons swing from tree to tree, horses gallop, and humans swipe on their phones—the different habitats and lifestyles of mammals rely on our unique forelimbs. No... more
Alligator study reveals insight into dinosaur hearing  SCIENCE DAILY · 16 hours
A biologist finds alligators build neural maps of sound the way birds do, suggesting the hearing strategy existed in their common ancestor, the dinosaurs. more
Back to the drawing board for conservationists battling against infectious parrot disease  SCIENCE DAILY · 16 hours
A study into the effectiveness of disinfecting birds' nests has led to a breakthrough in the understanding of biosecuity measures for the endangered echo... more
Rising global shipping traffic could lead to surge in invasive species  SCIENCE DAILY · 16 hours
Rising global maritime traffic could lead to sharp increases in invasive species around the world over the next 30 years, according to a new study. The... more
Study: Post-traumatic holocaust survivors transmit negative views on aging to offspring  NEWS MEDICAL · 16 hours
Favorable views on aging promote a general sense of wellbeing, increase self-efficacy, and motivate older adults to maintain a healthy lifestyle, ultimately influencing their own physical... more
Climate change negatively affects waterbirds in the American West  SCIENCE DAILY · 17 hours
New research shows that recent climate change is having profound effects on wetlands across the American West - affecting birds that use these wetlands for breeding, migration and wintering. more
Researchers use big data to gain better understanding of hepatitis E virus  NEWS MEDICAL · 17 hours
As far as research is concerned, hepatitis E had long led a shadowy existence - even though it is the main cause for acute... more
Cyprus bird trapping hits record low, says NGO  PHYS.ORG · 17 hours
The mass killing of migratory birds in Cyprus has reached a record low mainly due to a clampdown on illegal trapping in British military-controlled areas, a conservationist group said Monday. more
Excessive phosphate fertilizer use can reduce microbial functions critical to crop health  PHYS.ORG · 17 hours
Phosphorus is crucial for plant growth—with it, plants can acquire, transfer, and store the energy that helps them flourish in full health. Without it,... more
Alligator study reveals insight into dinosaur hearing  PHYS.ORG · 17 hours
To determine where a sound is coming from, animal brains analyze the minute difference in time it takes a sound to reach each ear—a cue known as interaural time difference. What happens to the... more
Gene medication shows promise to treat spinal cord injuries  NEWS MEDICAL · 18 hours
The two-gene medication has been proven to recover motor functions in rats. After several months of treatment, rodents were able to use previously paralyzed limbs. Researchers at Kazan Federal University... more
Why you shouldn't bury your pet in the backyard  PHYS.ORG · 18 hours
Companion animals are part of our families, but inevitably the time comes for us to say goodbye to them due to old age or disease. more
Water-resistant electronic skin with self-healing abilities created  SCIENCE DAILY · 18 hours
Inspired by jellyfish, researchers have created an electronic skin that is transparent, stretchable, touch-sensitive, and repairs itself in both wet and dry conditions. The novel material has wide-ranging uses, from water-resistant touch screens to... more
Rukwa Rift Basin Project names new Cretaceous mammal from East African Rift System  SCIENCE DAILY · 18 hours
Researchers announced a new species of mammal from the Age of Dinosaurs, representing the most complete mammal from the Cretaceous Period of... more
Who should Fido fear? Depends on relationship  SCIENCE DAILY · 18 hours
As states around the country move to stiffen punishments for animal cruelty, researchers have found a correlation between the types of animal abuse committed and the perpetrator's relationship to an animal and its owner. more
Eight new unique gene mutations in patients with hereditable heart muscle disease  SCIENCE DAILY · 18 hours
Researchers have identified eight new gene mutations that may cause or contribute to idiopathic dilated cardiomyopathy, a form of heart disease not caused by... more
Zika study may 'supercharge' vaccine research  PHYS.ORG · 19 hours
Scientists looking at the genetics of Zika virus have found a way to fast-track research which could lead to new vaccines. more
Rising global shipping traffic could lead to surge in invasive species  PHYS.ORG · 19 hours
Rising global maritime traffic could lead to sharp increases in invasive species around the world over the next 30 years, according to a new study by... more
Curious Kids: why bats sleep upside down, and other stories of animal adaptation  PHYS.ORG · 19 hours
Why do bats sleep upside down? - Questions from Year 5 at Brandon Park Primary School, Victoria. The class has been studying... more
Back to the drawing board for conservationists battling against infectious parrot disease  PHYS.ORG · 19 hours
A study into the effectiveness of disinfecting birds' nests, carried out by the University of Kent, has led to a breakthrough in the understanding... more
Who should Fido fear? Depends on relationship  PHYS.ORG · 19 hours
As states around the country move to stiffen punishments for animal cruelty, Michigan State University researchers have found a correlation between the types of animal abuse committed and the perpetrator's relationship to an animal... more
Hepatitis B virus sheds light on ancient human population movements into Australia  PHYS.ORG · 19 hours
Australian researchers have used current hepatitis B virus (HBV) genome sequences to deduce ancient human population movements into Australia, adding weight to the theory... more
Microbes can grow on nitric oxide  SCIENCE DAILY · 20 hours
Nitric oxide (NO) is a central molecule of the global nitrogen cycle. A study reveals that microorganisms can grow on NO. Their results change our view of the earth's nitrogen cycle and how microorganisms regulate the... more
Meet India’s starry dwarf frog — a species with no close relatives  SCIENCE-NEWS · 20 hours
The newly identified starry dwarf frog represents a new species, genus and potentially even a new family. more
Powerful machine-learning technique enables biologists to analyze enormous data sets  PHYS.ORG · 20 hours
Researchers at A*STAR have compared six data-analysis processes and come up with a clear winner in terms of speed, quality of analysis and reliability. The top performer took... more
Bright X-ray galactic nuclei  PHYS.ORG · 23 hours
All massive galaxies are believed to host supermassive black holes (SMBH) at their centers that grow by accreting mass from their environment. The current picture also imagines that the black holes grow in size as their host galaxy evolves, perhaps... more
Microbes can grow on nitric oxide  PHYS.ORG · 23 hours
Nitric oxide is a fascinating and versatile molecule, important for all living things as well as our environment. It is highly reactive and toxic; it is used as a signaling molecule; it depletes the ozone layer... more
Motion control at the nanoscale  PHYS.ORG · 23 hours
NUS Physicists have designed a bipedal nanowalker that can change its walking manner and direction by adjusting the length of its stride. Deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA)-based nanowalkers are a class of molecular motors which are being explored for a... more
Medical News Today: Hot tub folliculitis: Everything you need to know  MNT · 1 day
Hot tub folliculitis is a skin infection that occurs as a result of bacteria in hot tubs, baths, and pools. Learn more about the causes, symptoms,... more
Climate change negatively affects waterbirds in the American West  PHYS.ORG · 1 day
New research shows that recent climate change is having profound effects on wetlands across the American West – affecting birds that use these wetlands for breeding, migration and wintering. more
Call for halt to human gene editing and designer babies experiments  NEWS MEDICAL · 1 day
Powerful gene editing tools could soon face a global regulations on their use on human embryos, sperms or eggs. more
Snaring bacteria in DNA-based nets the way white blood cells do  nanowerk · 1 day
Today's antibiotics are not particularly engineered to coordinate their fight against bacteria with white blood cells, the body's own first line of defense against infectors, but... more
Dormant viruses activate during spaceflight  SCIENCE DAILY · 3 days
Herpes viruses reactivate in more than half of crew aboard Space Shuttle and International Space Station missions. While only a small proportion develop symptoms, virus reactivation rates increase with spaceflight duration and could present a significant health risk... more
A call for more comprehensive research models to study different aspects of puberty  NEWS MEDICAL · 3 days
Puberty is much more than just a time of biological overdrive, propelled by sexual maturation. Progress in developmental science has greatly broadened... more
Nitrogen pollution's path to streams weaves through more forests (and faster) than suspected  PHYS.ORG · 4 days
Nitrogen in rain and snow falls to the ground where, in theory, it is used by forest plants and microbes. New research... more
Dormant viruses activate during spaceflight  PHYS.ORG · 4 days
Herpes viruses reactivate in more than half of crew aboard Space Shuttle and International Space Station missions, according to NASA research published in Frontiers in Microbiology. While only a small proportion develop symptoms, virus reactivation rates increase with... more
Asteroid Bennu Is Rotating Faster Over Time  ASTRO WATCH · 4 days
In late 2018, the Origins, Spectral Interpretation, Resource Identification, Security-Regolith Explorer (OSIRIS-REx) spacecraft arrived at Bennu, the asteroid it will be studying... more
Promising gene therapy could restore vision in humans  NEWS MEDICAL · 4 days
It was surprisingly simple. University of California, Berkeley, scientists inserted a gene for a green-light receptor into the eyes of blind mice and, a month later, they were navigating around obstacles as... more
New research opens possibility of using sperm taken from testicles to overcome infertility  NEWS MEDICAL · 4 days
Scientists have found that sperm DNA from the testicles of many infertile men is as good as that of ejaculated sperm of... more
Nitrogen pollution's path to streams weaves through more forests (and faster) than suspected  SCIENCE DAILY · 4 days
Scientists have completed one of the largest and longest examinations to trace unprocessed nitrate movement in forests. The team found that some... more
Precision medicine for pediatric cancer  SCIENCE DAILY · 4 days
Research performed over the last several decades has led to an increased understanding of the genetics of cancer. The clinical application of this knowledge for pediatric cancer has lagged behind studies performed for adults. Medical researchers now survey... more
Study: Wild Sea Otters Leave Archaeological Traces  SCI-NEWS.COM · 4 days
Sea otters (Enhydra lutris) are the only marine mammals that use stone tools while foraging, using them to break open hard-shelled foods.... more
EU-funded project is developing new tools for diagnosing cancer  NEWS MEDICAL · 4 days
Proteins are the basis of cellular and physiological functioning in living organisms. The physical and chemical properties of proteins determine how they act and work within cells. more
Some shrimp make plasma with their claws. Now a 3-D printed claw can too  SCIENCE-NEWS · 4 days
Scientists used a replica of a shrimp claw to re-create the extreme pressures and temperatures that the animals produce underwater. more
Bioinspired mechanical device generates plasma in water via cavitation  Science Magazine · 4 days
Nature can generate plasma in liquids more efficiently than human-designed devices using electricity, acoustics, or light. In the animal world, snapping shrimp can induce cavitation that collapses to produce high... more
Uncovering uncultivated microbes in the human gut  SCIENCE DAILY · 4 days
A human's health is shaped both by environmental factors and the body's interactions with the microbiome, particularly in the gut. Genome sequences are critical for characterizing individual microbes and understanding their functional roles. However,... more
Sources and Sinks: What drives long-term climatic trends?  SCIENCE DAILY · 4 days
For the entire history of our species, humans have lived on a planet capped by a chunk of ice at each pole. But Earth has been ice-free for about 75 percent of... more
With single gene insertion, blind mice regain sight  SCIENCE DAILY · 4 days
People left blind by retinal degeneration have one option: electronic eye implants. Neuroscientists have now developed an alternative: gene therapy that, in tests, restored vision in blind mice. A gene for green... more
Tracking turtles with telemetry  SCIENCE DAILY · 4 days
A new model has been created that can forecast the location of Eastern Pacific leatherback turtles along the coast of Central and South America in an effort to decrease bycatch mortality of this critically endangered and ecologically important species. more
In this nematode species males are needed for reproduction but not their genes  SCIENCE DAILY · 4 days
In the Mesorhabditis belari roundworm, the sole purpose of males is to help females produce clones of themselves. more
Pests and the plant defenses against them drive diversity in tropical rainforests  SCIENCE DAILY · 4 days
Researchers have been baffled by tropical rainforest diversity for over a century; 650 different tree species can exist in an area covering two football... more
Unique diversity of the genetic history of the Iberian Peninsula revealed by dual studies  SCIENCE DAILY · 4 days
Researchers have analyzed ancient DNA from almost 300 individuals from the Iberian Peninsula, spanning more than 12,000 years. The first... more
Machine learning approach sheds light on the biology of liver and kidneys after toxin exposure  NEWS MEDICAL · 4 days
Exposure to potentially harmful chemicals is a reality of life. Our ancestors, faced with naturally occurring toxins, evolved... more
Study confirms sensitivity of microbiological cultures for detecting cholera  NEWS MEDICAL · 4 days
Recently, the sensitivity of fecal microbiological cultures for detecting cholera has come under question. Researchers reporting in PLOS Neglected Tropical Diseases investigated this claim using a ‘vaccine probe’ analysis of... more
Stormtropis: New Genus of Bald-Legged Spiders Named after Star Wars’ Stormtroopers  SCI-NEWS.COM · 4 days
An international team of researchers has described six new species of bald-legged spiders from... more
Biosensor may provide better cancer diagnosis  nanowerk · 4 days
Researchers have developed a new biological sensor that could help clinicians better diagnose cancer and epilepsy. more
As climate continues to warm, study finds several barriers to northward tree migration  PHYS.ORG · 4 days
Extensive land development, invasive species and too many deer may make it difficult for tree migration to keep pace with climate change... more
A new approach to drugging a difficult cancer target  PHYS.ORG · 4 days
One of the most common cancer-promoting genes, known as Myc, is also one of the most difficult to target with drugs. Scientists have long tried to develop drugs that block... more
Ocean sink for man-made CO2 measured  PHYS.ORG · 4 days
An international research project led by scientists from ETH Zurich has determined the amount of man-made CO2 emissions taken up by the ocean between 1994 and 2007. Not all of the CO2 generated during the combustion... more
Biosensor may provide better cancer diagnosis  PHYS.ORG · 4 days
Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) researchers have developed a new biological sensor that could help clinicians better diagnose cancer and epilepsy. more
Softer, processed foods changed the way ancient humans spoke  PHYS.ORG · 4 days
The human capacity for language divides our species from the rest of the animal kingdom. Language has not only allowed us to conquer all corners of the globe, but to... more
Uncovering uncultivated microbes in the human gut  PHYS.ORG · 4 days
A tree's growth is dependent on nutrients from the soil and water, as well as the microbes in, on, and around the roots. Similarly, a human's health is shaped both by environmental factors and... more
Study proves importance of bird poo in enhancing coral growth  PHYS.ORG · 4 days
A University of Otago study has shown the positive impact bird poo, or guano, has on coral growth in tropical seas. Published online in the respected scientific journal... more
Bacteria may help frogs attract mates  PHYS.ORG · 4 days
Brazilian scientists have discovered that the strong odor released by some amphibian species is produced by bacteria and that attracting a mate is one of its purposes. more
Soluble epoxide hydrolase in mammals diminishes the body's ability to self-repair  PHYS.ORG · 4 days
In the 1980s, researchers at the University of California, Riverside, were looking for a way to control insects and found an enzyme—called JHEH—that, when inhibited, prevents... more
New 3-D map will help solve long-standing cosmic mysteries  PHYS.ORG · 4 days
A new study led by ANU has created a 3D map of the magnetic field in a small wedge of the Milky Way galaxy, paving the way for future discoveries... more
Converting biomass by applying mechanical force  PHYS.ORG · 4 days
One of the greatest global challenges is the efficient use of renewable sources in order to meet the increasing demand for energy and feedstock chemicals in the future. In this context, biomass is a promising alternative... more
New Metrohm Eco Titrator makes titration simple, safe, and reliable  NEWS MEDICAL · 4 days
When something goes wrong in quality control, the reputation of the brand concerned is at stake. Better to exclude risks in the first place. more
A new T. rex exhibit takes a deep dive into the iconic dinosaur  SCIENCE-NEWS · 4 days
“T. rex: The Ultimate Predator,” a new exhibit in New York City, draws on the latest science to provide a fresh look... more
Fingermark imaging for identification of drugs  NEWS MEDICAL · 4 days
In a paper to be published in the forthcoming issue in NANO, researchers from Zhejiang have uncovered a novel method of using nanocarrier-based biological fluorescent probes for detecting amphetamine and ketamine in latent fingermark, in a... more
Feds to ease land restrictions across US West  PHYS.ORG · 4 days
The Trump administration is finalizing plans to ease restrictions on oil and gas drilling and other industries that were meant to protect an imperiled bird species that ranges across the American West,... more
California science exhibit explains the dog-human friendship  PHYS.ORG · 4 days
Did people domesticate dogs or was it the other way around? And why do these two species seem to think so much alike, act so much alike and get along so well? more
Natural speed limit on DNA replication sets pace for life's first steps  NEWS MEDICAL · 4 days
Fruit flies make for stingy mothers, imparting only a portion of the genetic building blocks their offspring need to survive. The rest must be... more
Using Thoreau, scientists measure the impact of climate change on wildflowers  PHYS.ORG · 4 days
A new study published in Ecology Letters is using observations made by Henry David Thoreau—19th-century American naturalist, social reformer, and philosopher—to explore the effects of climate... more
AlgaeDNAWhalesCRISPR
Some shrimp make plasma with their claws. Now a 3-D printed claw can too
SCIENCE-NEWS
Video: Are we running out of helium?
PHYS.ORG
From busking pigeons to head banging sea lions – can animals feel the beat?
PHYS.ORG
23andMe to predict risk of diabetes from genetic makeup
NEWS MEDICAL
The app that warns you about snacks you can’t add to your shopping cart
NEWS MEDICAL
The summer bushfires you didn't hear about, and the invasive species fuelling them
PHYS.ORG
How birds become male or female, and occasionally both
PHYS.ORG
Sugar set for 'energycane' reinvention
PHYS.ORG
Rehearsing for the Mars landings in Hawaii and Idaho
PHYS.ORG
Video: Small angle neutron scattering
PHYS.ORG
Investigating the motility of swimming Euglena
PHYS.ORG
Scientists engineer mouse 'smart house' to study behavior
PHYS.ORG
Rare butterfly species more abundant in older, wider seismic lines
PHYS.ORG
Gamma ray telescopes could detect starships powered by black hole
PHYS.ORG
Bugs or dust? New method quickly reveals whether a surface is truly clean
PHYS.ORG
This alligator gar sucks—at lightning speeds
Science Magazine
How a school of fish is like a rubber band
Science Magazine
How do insects feel the heat?
PHYS.ORG
Team discovers protein, lipid connection that could aid new influenza therapies
PHYS.ORG
Open-source application creates super-resolution images of cell development in living animals
PHYS.ORG
Fresh