Biology
Depression puts teen girls in South Africa at higher risk of HIV infection  NEWS MEDICAL · 3 hours
Teen girls in South Africa face an extraordinary threat of HIV: By the time they reach adulthood, one in four South African... more
Meningitis: Causes, Symptoms & Treatment  LIVE SCIENCE · 4 hours
Meningitis is an infection of the membranes covering the brain and spinal cord. The disease is usually caused by bacteria, viruses and fungi, and its telltale signs are a severe headache, sudden fever and stiff neck. more
Oral vaccination with cholera toxin helps counteract age-associated obesity  NEWS MEDICAL · 4 hours
Here the research team tested a safe and well-established microbe-based immune adjuvant to restore immune homeostasis and counteract inflammation-associated obesity in animal models. more
MIT researchers develop method to isolate T cells primed for certain allergies or infections  NEWS MEDICAL · 5 hours
When your immune system is exposed to a vaccine, an allergen, or an infectious microbe, subsets of T cells that... more
Endangered whales react to environmental changes  PHYS.ORG · 7 hours
Some "canaries" are 50 feet long, weigh 70 tons, and are nowhere near a coal mine. But the highly endangered North Atlantic right whale is sending the same kind of message about disruptive change in the... more
Technique identifies T cells primed for certain allergies or infections  SCIENCE DAILY · 7 hours
Researchers can now identify T cells reactive to a particular target from a patient's cells, and to perform high-throughput single-cell RNA sequencing of those cells. more
Bats in attics might be necessary for conservation  SCIENCE DAILY · 7 hours
Researchers investigate and describe the conservation importance of buildings relative to natural, alternative roosts for little brown bats in Yellowstone National Park. more
Bats in attics might be necessary for conservation  PHYS.ORG · 8 hours
For the little brown bat—a small mouse-eared bat with glossy brown fur—a warm, dry place to roost is essential to the species' survival. Reproductive females huddle their small furry bodies together to... more
Technique identifies T cells primed for certain allergies or infections  MIT · 8 hours
Researchers develop a method to isolate and sequence the RNA of T cells that react to a specific target. more
Cleveland Clinic receives NIH grant to study link between gut microbes, cardiometabolic diseases  NEWS MEDICAL · 8 hours
The National Institutes of Health has awarded more than $12 million to Cleveland Clinic researchers to study the critical link between gut... more
Scientists develop new therapy for acute myeloid leukemia  NEWS MEDICAL · 8 hours
Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory scientists, with chemists and cancer biologists from Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, have developed a new therapy that extended the survival of mice with acute myeloid leukemia. more
CTF, DELopen jointly offer unique opportunities to neurofibromatosis research community  NEWS MEDICAL · 8 hours
The Children's Tumor Foundation, an innovative and global neurofibromatosis (NF) research foundation announced today a collaboration with DELopen, a DNA-encoded library technology platform sponsored by WuXi AppTec, a... more
Striking variation in mechanisms that drive sex selection in frogs  SCIENCE DAILY · 10 hours
Researchers have discovered striking variation in the underlying genetic machinery that orchestrates sexual differentiation in frogs, demonstrating that evolution of this crucial biological system has moved at a... more
Scientists engineer 'Venus flytrap' bio-sensors to snare pollutants  SCIENCE DAILY · 10 hours
The biological sensors change color once they have successfully snared a target molecule, and will soon have a host of important environmental, medical and security applications. more
RNA regulation is crucial for embryonic stem cell differentiation  SCIENCE DAILY · 10 hours
Nuclear RNA levels are kept in check by RNA decay factors. Now, researchers show that an excess of RNA in the nucleus can have negative effects on a crucial regulator... more
Deep-sea bacteria copy their neighbors' diet  SCIENCE DAILY · 10 hours
A new group of symbiotic bacteria in deep-sea mussels surprises with the way they fix carbon: They use the Calvin cycle to turn carbon into tasty food. The bacteria acquired the genes for this process from... more
Atoms, molecules or even living cells can be manipulated with light beams  SCIENCE DAILY · 10 hours
Special light beams can be used to manipulate molecules or small biological particles. However, these optical tweezers only work with objects in empty space.... more
New species of seaweed uncovered by genetic analyses  SCIENCE DAILY · 10 hours
Genetic analyses have revealed remarkably higher species diversity in common red seaweed than previously assumed. It was thought that there were only five related species of the Gloiopeltis genus worldwide. However, it... more
Catatonia in Down syndrome  SCIENCE DAILY · 10 hours
Down syndrome, due to an extra chromosome 21, occurs in 250,000 children and adults in the United States, making it the country's most common chromosomal disorder. Inherited heart defects, thyroid cancer, celiac disease and developmental disabilities are common Down syndrome... more
MU researchers describe Down syndrome-associated catatonia  NEWS MEDICAL · 10 hours
Down syndrome, due to an extra chromosome 21, occurs in 250,000 children and adults in the United States, making it the country's most common chromosomal disorder. Inherited heart defects, thyroid cancer, celiac disease and developmental disabilities... more
Birds of a feather flock together, but how do they decide where to go?  PHYS.ORG · 10 hours
Coordinated behavior is common in a variety of biological systems, such as insect swarms, fish schools and bacterial colonies. But... more
Researchers develop a database to aid in identifying key genes for bacterial infections  PHYS.ORG · 10 hours
Infectious diseases are caused by pathogenic microorganisms capable of entering, colonizing and growing within a host organism, thus producing an infection. Bacterial... more
Researchers discover remarkable variation in genetic mechanisms that drive sexual differentiation of frogs  PHYS.ORG · 10 hours
Researchers from McMaster University have discovered striking variation in the underlying genetic machinery that orchestrates sexual differentiation in frogs, demonstrating that evolution... more
Deep-sea bacteria copy their neighbors' diet  PHYS.ORG · 10 hours
In the deep sea, far away from the light of the sun, organisms use chemical energy to fix carbon. At hydrothermal vents—where hot, mineral-rich water gushes out of towering chimneys called black smokers—vibrant ecosystems are fueled... more
RNA regulation is crucial for embryonic stem cell differentiation  PHYS.ORG · 10 hours
Embryonic stem cells (ESCs) are distinguished by their dual ability to self-renew and their potential to differentiate, both of which require tight regulatory control. During the differentiation of ESCs, various... more
Antibiotics from the sea  SCIENCE DAILY · 11 hours
Biologists have succeeded in cultivating several dozen marine bacteria in the laboratory -- bacteria that had previously been paid little attention. The researchers then carried out a functional characterization of the bacteria, thus enabling a systematic screening for active substances.... more
Exoplanet axis study boosts hopes of complex life, just not next door  nanowerk · 11 hours
Astrophysicists modeled a theoretical twin of Earth into other star systems called binary systems because they have two stars. They concluded that 87% of... more
Drones carting GoPros to track gray whale behavior and spot their poop off Oregon Coast  PHYS.ORG · 11 hours
Using drones deployed in the air and GoPros underwater, Oregon State University marine ecologist Leigh Torres recently completed... more
Research uncovers first evidence of RNA-triggered phase separation  PHYS.ORG · 11 hours
A fundamental question in biology is how cells orchestrate chemical reactions in time and space. more
New finding on origin of avian predentary in Mesozoic birds  PHYS.ORG · 11 hours
The predentary bone is one of the most enigmatic skeletal elements in avian evolution. Located at the tip of the lower jaw, this bone is absent in more... more
Researchers find secret of beetle success: Stolen genes  PHYS.ORG · 11 hours
An international team of researchers has found what appears to be one of the secrets to evolutionary success for beetles—genes stolen from bacteria and fungi. In their paper published in Proceedings of... more
Scientists engineer 'Venus flytrap' bio-sensors to snare pollutants  PHYS.ORG · 11 hours
Scientists from Trinity have created a suite of new biological sensors by chemically re-engineering pigments to act like tiny Venus flytraps. more
New species of seaweed uncovered by genetic analyses  PHYS.ORG · 12 hours
Genetic analyses have revealed remarkably higher species diversity in common red seaweed than previously assumed. It was thought that there were only five related species of the Gloiopeltis genus (known as 'funori'... more
Some small mammals undeterred by industrial activity, study shows  PHYS.ORG · 12 hours
Two common species of small mammals are not significantly disturbed by industrial activity near their homes, according to a new study by University of Alberta scientists. more
Four ways to curb light pollution, save bugs  SCIENCE DAILY · 12 hours
Artificial light at night negatively impacts thousands of species: beetles, moths, wasps and other insects that have evolved to use light levels as cues for courtship, foraging and navigation. Scientists reviewed 229... more
Metagenomics unlocks unknowns of diarrheal disease cases in children  PHYS.ORG · 13 hours
Using advanced metagenomics techniques, researchers have found that conventional culture-based lab tests may misdiagnose as many as half of the microbial causes of diarrheal diseases in children. The study, based... more
How India's changing cotton sector has led to distress, illnesses, failure  PHYS.ORG · 13 hours
India is the No. 1 cotton producer in the world, but its crop is in distress. Heavy use of pesticides, new genetically modified seeds, suicides, and... more
Coming to a head: How vertebrates became predators by tweaking the neural crest  PHYS.ORG · 13 hours
Lamprey are blood-sucking vampire-like fish that attach to and eventually kill game fish, making them the bane of many a fisherman's existence.... more
Mitochondrial mixing mechanism critical for sperm production in mice  PHYS.ORG · 13 hours
Mitochondria, often thought of as the powerhouses of cells, are just one part of a larger living thing, but they are unique among cellular structures in that they have their... more
Mechanism connects early binge drinking to adult behaviors  SCIENCE DAILY · 13 hours
Intermittent exposure to high levels of alcohol in adolescent animals leads to increased levels of microRNA-137 in the brains of adults. Blocking microRNA-137 helps to reverse or the lasting effects of youth... more
Gut microbiota imbalance promotes the onset of colorectal cancer  SCIENCE DAILY · 13 hours
Researchers have demonstrated that an imbalance in the gut microbiota, also known as 'dysbiosis', promotes the onset of colorectal cancer. The teams demonstrated that transplanting fecal flora from patients with... more
A genetic tug-of-war between the sexes begets variation  SCIENCE DAILY · 13 hours
In species with sexual reproduction, no two individuals are alike and scientists have long struggled to understand why there is so much genetic variation. A new study shows that a genetic tug-of-war... more
The little duck that could: Study finds endangered Hawaiian duck endures  SCIENCE DAILY · 13 hours
New research has found that the genetic diversity of the koloa is high, and conservation efforts on the island of Kauai have been successful. more
Study measures impact of agriculture on diet of wild mammals  PHYS.ORG · 14 hours
Margays (Leopardus wiedii), small wild cats living in forest areas fragmented by agriculture near Campinas and Botucatu in São Paulo State, Brazil, prey on animals inhabiting nearby sugarcane... more
From origin of life to materials genomics  nanowerk · 15 hours
The origin of early life and the basic building blocks such as DNA and RNA have been hypothesized to have resulted due to accumulation of precursors within hydrothermal vents. The thermal gradients result in... more
UNT scientist helps advance archaeology millions of years  PHYS.ORG · 17 hours
Reid Ferring, a professor in the University of North Texas Department of Geography and the Environment, is part of an international team of scientists who have developed a breakthrough method of identifying... more
Butterfly on a bomb range: Endangered Species Act at work  PHYS.ORG · 17 hours
In the unlikely setting of the world's most populated military installation, amid all the regimented chaos, you'll find the Endangered Species Act at work. more
Access to food and nutrition more limited in sub-Saharan Africa than previously estimated  PHYS.ORG · 18 hours
A survey of over six thousand sub-Saharan households shows an estimated 39% experience severely unreliable access to food. In addition, 49% have... more
Medical News Today: Why you should wash fruits and vegetables  MNT · 1 day
People should always wash fruits and vegetables before eating or cooking them. Washing them reduces the risk of consuming harmful bacteria. Learn more here. more
A Rare Genetic Disorder Turned These Siblings' Blood 'Milky' White  LIVE SCIENCE · 1 day
Three siblings all carried two copies of a mutated gene, which caused their blood to run white with fat. more
Superbug battle: Bacteria structure may be key to new antibiotics  PHYS.ORG · 1 day
Cornell researchers have uncovered the structure of a regulatory mechanism unique to bacteria, opening the door for designing new antibiotics targeted to pathogens. more
Potato virus Y is the most serious threat to potato—some strains more than others  PHYS.ORG · 1 day
Potato virus Y (PVY) is the most serious problem facing the potato industry in the United States and is the... more
Antibiotics face an existential crisis  NEWS MEDICAL · 1 day
Antibiotics are facing an existential crisis less than a century after their introduction. The bacteria-fighting drugs are becoming less effective as a result of their overuse in both humans and animals. more
Quantum light improves sensitivity of biological measurements  PHYS.ORG · 1 day
In a new study, researchers showed that quantum light can be used to track enzyme reactions in real time. The work brings together quantum physics and biology in an important step toward the development... more
Four ways to curb light pollution, save bugs  PHYS.ORG · 1 day
Artificial light at night negatively impacts thousands of species: beetles, moths, wasps and other insects that have evolved to use light levels as cues for courtship, foraging and navigation. more
'Gay' Penguin Couple Had No Egg of Their Own. So They Stole One.  LIVE SCIENCE · 1 day
A pair of mated male penguins in a Dutch zoo were so eager for offspring that they stole an egg from another... more
Potential new therapy for progeria  NEWS MEDICAL · 1 day
Aging is a complex and natural process that affects all living organisms. As people age, normal biological processes are affecting, resulting in a decline in various organs and age-related conditions. Though aging is normal, some children affected by... more
Unlikely wasp enemy of a serious alien pest in North America named Idris elba  SCIENCE DAILY · 1 day
Idris is a worldwide genus of microscopic, parasitic wasps. A new species of Idris from Mexico (Guanajuato) and the United... more
Quantum light improves sensitivity of biological measurements  SCIENCE DAILY · 1 day
In a new study, researchers showed that quantum light can be used to track enzyme reactions in real time. The work brings together quantum physics and biology in an important step toward the development... more
Yellowstone's migrating bison manipulate springtime green-up  PHYS.ORG · 1 day
On a typical June day in Yellowstone, it's not unusual to see hundreds of bison grazing in the Lamar Valley. The herds appear to aimlessly move back and forth through meadows threaded by a winding river,... more
Tracking inheritance of human mitochondrial DNA  PHYS.ORG · 1 day
New insight into how genetic information stored in human mitochondria is passed from one generation to the next could have important implications for genetic counseling of women planning pregnancies, according to a study by researchers at... more
Can plants tell us something about longevity?  PHYS.ORG · 1 day
The oldest living organism on Earth is a plant, Methuselah a bristlecone pine (Pinus longaeva) that is over 5000 years old. Conversely, animals only live up to a few hundred years. Can we learn... more
Study of Wisconsin walleye finds recreational fishing contributes to stock declines  PHYS.ORG · 1 day
There's a long-standing belief in the freshwater fishing community that once anglers find it too hard to land a particular fish for their dinner plate, they... more
How gene expression noise shapes cell fate  SCIENCE DAILY · 1 day
Researcher develops a method for measuring gene expression noise across single cells in complex tissue. more
Synthetic biologists developing a new class of high-performance materials  SCIENCE DAILY · 1 day
Synthetic biologists have developed a process that could lead to a new class of synthetic polymers that may create new high-performance materials and therapeutics for Soldiers. more
Switching to renewable energy could save thousands of lives in Africa  SCIENCE DAILY · 1 day
New research finds that if Africa chooses a future powered by fossil fuels, nearly 50,000 people could die prematurely each year from fossil fuel emissions by... more
Researchers clear the path for 'designer' plants  SCIENCE DAILY · 1 day
A team of researchers has found a way to identify gene regulatory elements that could help produce 'designer' plants and lead to improvements in food crops at a critical time. more
Standard form of treatment may not be always enough to treat OCD  NEWS MEDICAL · 1 day
They wash their hands until the skin hangs in tatters, are in a state of panic about bacteria and infections - and are unable... more
Tailored T-cells safe, may be effective in preventing and treating multiple viral infections  NEWS MEDICAL · 1 day
Tailored T-cells specially designed to combat a half dozen viruses are safe and may be effective in preventing and treating multiple viral... more
Implementing no-till and cover crops in Texas cotton systems  PHYS.ORG · 1 day
Healthy soil leads to productive and sustainable agriculture. Farmers who work with, not against, the soil can improve the resiliency of their land. Because of this, practices such as no-till... more
Researchers clear the path for 'designer' plants  PHYS.ORG · 1 day
A team of researchers at the University of Georgia has found a way to identify gene regulatory elements that could help produce "designer" plants and lead to improvements in food crops at a critical... more
'Dysbiosis' promotes the onset of colorectal cancer  NEWS MEDICAL · 1 day
The gastroenterology team at Henri-Mondor AP-HP Hospital and University Paris-Est Créteil, led by Professor Iradj Sobhani, together with teams from Inserm and the Institut Pasteur Molecular Microbial Pathogenesis Unit (U1202), led by Professor Philippe... more
Unlikely wasp enemy of a serious alien pest in North America named Idris elba  PHYS.ORG · 1 day
A parasitic wasp was recently discovered in Guanajuato, Mexico, where it was found to parasitize the eggs of an invasive... more
Should scientists change the way they view (and study) same sex behavior in animals?  PHYS.ORG · 1 day
Over the years, scientists have recorded same-sex sexual behavior in more than 1,500 animal species, from snow geese to common... more
Switching to renewable energy could save thousands of lives in Africa  PHYS.ORG · 1 day
With economies and populations surging, an industrial revolution is inevitable on the African continent. The question is, what's going to power it? With renewable energy cheaper... more
Army project may lead to new class of high-performance materials  PHYS.ORG · 1 day
Synthetic biologists working on a U.S. Army project have developed a process that could lead to a new class of synthetic polymers that may create new high-performance materials... more
How gene expression noise shapes cell fate  PHYS.ORG · 1 day
Essential genes are often expressed with high variability during the development of cells. Scientists call this phenomenon "biological noise" and suspect that it is also decisive for the fate of cells, i.e. the developmental... more
Mantis shrimp vs. disco clams: Colorful sea creatures do more than dazzle  PHYS.ORG · 1 day
When Lindsey Dougherty was an undergraduate student at CU Boulder in 2011, she got the chance to visit North Sulawesi, Indonesia, on a research... more
Antibiotics from the sea  PHYS.ORG · 1 day
The team led by Prof. Christian Jogler of Friedrich Schiller University, Jena, has succeeded in cultivating several dozen marine bacteria in the laboratory—bacteria that had previously been paid little attention. The researchers then carried out a functional characterisation of the... more
Researchers identify “mutational footprint” caused by chemotherapy that leads to side effects  NEWS MEDICAL · 1 day
Researchers have characterized the "mutational footprint" that results from chemotherapy and leads to long-term side effects. more
BGU researchers discover gene that causes nighttime atrial fibrillation  NEWS MEDICAL · 1 day
Genetic studies spanning three generations of a Persian Jewish family by researchers at Ben-Gurion University of the Negev. have identified a gene that causes nighttime atrial fibrillation (AFib). more
Paleontologists Unearth Another Giant Penguin in New Zealand  SCI-NEWS.COM · 1 day
Paleontologists in New Zealand have uncovered a nearly complete skeleton of a giant-sized penguin that swam the oceans about 27... more
A genetic tug-of-war between the sexes begets variation  PHYS.ORG · 1 day
In species with sexual reproduction, no two individuals are alike, and scientists have long struggled to understand why there is so much genetic variation. In a new study published in Nature Ecology... more
New method takes analysis of genetic libraries to next level  PHYS.ORG · 1 day
Uppsala researchers have developed a new method for investigating dynamic processes in large genetic libraries. By using this method to study cell cycle regulation,researchers can paint a clearer... more
Dozens of potential new antibiotics discovered with free online app  PHYS.ORG · 1 day
A new web tool speeds the discovery of drugs to kill Gram-negative bacteria, which are responsible for the overwhelming majority of antibiotic-resistant infections and deaths. The tool also... more
Protein imaging at the speed of life  PHYS.ORG · 1 day
To study the swiftness of biology—the protein chemistry behind every life function—scientists need to see molecules changing and interacting in unimaginably rapid time increments—trillionths of a second or shorter. more
Saving 'half Earth' for nature would affect over a billion people  PHYS.ORG · 1 day
As the extinction crisis escalates, and protest movements grow, some are calling for hugely ambitious conservation targets. Among the most prominent is sparing 50% of the... more
Scientists uncover resistance genes for deadly ash tree disease  PHYS.ORG · 1 day
New research has identified the genetic basis of resistance to ash dieback in UK trees, opening up new avenues for conservation. more
Moss: A bio-monitor of atmospheric nitrogen deposition in the Yangtze River Delta  PHYS.ORG · 1 day
Atmospheric reactive nitrogen (N) deposition has more than doubled over the past century.  It is very important to estimate the rates and sources of... more
Are hyoliths Palaeozoic lophophorates?  PHYS.ORG · 1 day
Hyoliths are extinct invertebrates with calcareous shells that were common constituents of Cambrian fauna and formed a minor component of benthic faunas throughout the Palaeozoic until their demise in the end-Permian mass extinction. The biological affinity of hyoliths has long... more
Mars scientists investigate ancient life in Australia  PHYS.ORG · 2 days
As any geologist worth his or her salt will tell you, there are rocks, and then there are rocks. Next July, NASA and the European Space Agency (ESA) are launching rovers to Mars that... more
Researchers in Japan uncover fossil of bird from Early Cretaceous  PHYS.ORG · 2 days
A combined team of researchers from Japan and China has announced the finding and study of the fossilized remains of a bird from the Early Cretaceous. In their... more
Fossil dig leads to unexpected discovery of 91-million-year-old shark new to science  PHYS.ORG · 2 days
A 91-million-year-old fossil shark newly named Cretodus houghtonorum discovered in Kansas joins a list of large dinosaur-era animals. Preserved in sediments deposited in an... more
How mammoth poop contributes to antibiotics research  PHYS.ORG · 2 days
Ph.D. student Doris van Bergeijk brought 40,000-year-old bacteria from mammoth poop back to life. She hopes to find new information that can help research at the Institute of Biology Leiden into antibiotics and antibiotics... more
Research suggests ponies could play critical role in Dartmoor's future health  PHYS.ORG · 2 days
Dartmoor ponies are among the most iconic species of any British moorland. But a dramatic decline in population since the 1950s has led to widespread concern... more
Researchers discover new mutations in gene associated with disease that causes the heart to weaken  SCIENCE DAILY · 2 days
Researchers from the Intermountain Healthcare Heart Institute in Salt Lake City have identified new mutations in a gene... more
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