Biology
Ozaena ground beetles likely parasitize ants throughout their life cycle  SCIENCE DAILY · 7 minutes
Ozaena ground beetles likely have anatomical adaptations enabling them to parasitize ant nests throughout their life cycle, according to a new study. more
60 percent of coffee varieties face 'extinction risk'  PHYS.ORG · 37 minutes
Three in five species of wild coffee are at risk of extinction as a deadly mix of climate change, disease and deforestation puts the future of the world's favourite beverage in jeopardy,... more
Romeo and Juliet: the last hopes to save Bolivian aquatic frog  PHYS.ORG · 37 minutes
Almost a year after conservationists sent out a plea to help save a species of Bolivian aquatic frog by finding a mate for the last remaining... more
Robot recreates the walk of a 290-million-year-old creature  PHYS.ORG · 37 minutes
How did the earliest land animals move? Scientists have used a nearly 300-million-year old fossil skeleton and preserved ancient footprints to create a moving robot model of prehistoric life. more
Feathers: Better than Velcro?  SCIENCE DAILY · 43 minutes
The structures zipping together the barbs in bird feathers could provide a model for new adhesives and new aerospace materials, according to a new study. Researchers 3D printed models of the structures to better understand their properties. more
Climate change: How could artificial photosynthesis contribute to limiting global warming?  SCIENCE DAILY · 1 hour
If CO2 emissions do not fall fast enough, then CO2 will have to be removed from the atmosphere to limit global warming. Not only could planting... more
Coralline red algae have existed for 300 million years longer than presumed  SCIENCE DAILY · 1 hour
Coralline red algae have existed for 130 million years, in other words since the Cretaceous Period, the time of the dinosaurs. At least this... more
Simple rules predict and explain biological mutualism  SCIENCE DAILY · 1 hour
Scientists have long employed relatively simple guidelines to help explain the physical world, from Newton's second law of motion to the laws of thermodynamics. Biomedical engineers have used dynamic modeling and machine learning to... more
Jellyfish map could be the future to protecting UK waters and fish  SCIENCE DAILY · 1 hour
Researchers have developed a map of chemicals found in jellyfish caught across 1 million square kilometers of UK waters. The same chemicals are found... more
How manganese produces a parkinsonian syndrome  SCIENCE DAILY · 1 hour
Using X-ray fluorescence at synchrotrons DESY and ESRF, researchers have demonstrated the consequences of a mutation responsible for a hereditary parkinsonian syndrome: accumulated manganese in the cells appears to disturb protein transport. more
[Research Articles] Identification of biologic agents to neutralize the bicomponent leukocidins of Staphylococcus aureus  Science Magazine · 2 hours
A key aspect underlying the severity of infections caused by Staphylococcus aureus is the abundance of virulence factors that the... more
‘Junk DNA’ may help yeast survive stress  Science Magazine · 2 hours
Spare genetic sequences could help the fungi conserve resources in lean times more
Marine mammals and sea turtles recovering after Endangered Species Act protection  PHYS.ORG · 2 hours
More than three-quarters of marine mammal and sea turtle populations have significantly increased after listing of the U.S. Endangered Species Act (ESA), according to a study... more
Ozaena ground beetles likely parasitize ants throughout their life cycle  PHYS.ORG · 2 hours
Ozaena ground beetles likely have anatomical adaptations enabling them to parasitize ant nests throughout their life cycle, according to a study published January 16, 2019 in the open-access... more
Gut bacteria make key amino acids dispensable, expanding food options for invasive flies  PHYS.ORG · 2 hours
Fruit flies fed antibiotics to supress their gut microbiome are forced to avoid the best food patches if they lack vital amino... more
Researchers set standards for models in biodiversity assessments  PHYS.ORG · 2 hours
Over the past 20 years, more than 6000 studies have used one of the most common classes of biodiversity modeling, species distribution models (SDMs). Over half of the studies using SDMs sought... more
How stem cells self-organize in the developing embryo  SCIENCE DAILY · 2 hours
New study uses live imaging to understand a critical step in early embryonic development -- how genes and molecules control forces to orchestrate the emergence of form in the developing embryo. The... more
An ancient child from East Asia grew teeth like a modern human  SCIENCE-NEWS · 2 hours
Fossilized choppers from an ancient child with a mysterious evolutionary background indicate that hominids evolved a humanlike life span in East Asia by at... more
Bacteria In Worms Make A Mosquito Repellent That Might Beat DEET  NPR · 2 hours
An insect-killing bacteria that lives inside a parasitic worm might hold the key to developing a powerful new repellent. more
Scaling of bird wings and feathers for efficient flight  Science Magazine · 2 hours
Aves are an incredibly diverse class of animals, ranging greatly in size and thriving in a wide variety of environments. Here, we explore the scaling trends of bird wings in... more
Standards for distribution models in biodiversity assessments  Science Magazine · 2 hours
Demand for models in biodiversity assessments is rising, but which models are adequate for the task? We propose a set of best-practice standards and detailed guidelines enabling scoring of studies based on species distribution... more
Universal scaling across biochemical networks on Earth  Science Magazine · 2 hours
The application of network science to biology has advanced our understanding of the metabolism of individual organisms and the organization of ecosystems but has scarcely been applied to life at a planetary scale. To... more
High-throughput label-free molecular fingerprinting flow cytometry  Science Magazine · 2 hours
Flow cytometry is an indispensable tool in biology for counting and analyzing single cells in large heterogeneous populations. However, it predominantly relies on fluorescent labeling to differentiate cells and, hence, comes with several fundamental drawbacks. Here,... more
Bacteria: A novel source for potent mosquito feeding-deterrents  Science Magazine · 2 hours
Antibiotic and insecticidal bioactivities of the extracellular secondary metabolites produced by entomopathogenic bacteria belonging to genus Xenorhabdus have been identified; however, their novel applications such as mosquito feeding-deterrence have not been reported.... more
High extinction risk for wild coffee species and implications for coffee sector sustainability  Science Magazine · 2 hours
Wild coffee species are critical for coffee crop development and, thus, for sustainability of global coffee production. Despite this fact, the extinction... more
A four-legged robot hints at how ancient tetrapods walked  SCIENCE-NEWS · 3 hours
Using fossils, computer simulations and a life-size walking robot, researchers re-created how an early tetrapod may have made tracks. more
Proteins use a lock and key system to bind to DNA  PHYS.ORG · 3 hours
You can think of DNA as a string of letters—As, Cs, Ts, and Gs—that together spell out the information needed for the construction and function of... more
How stem cells self-organize in the developing embryo  PHYS.ORG · 3 hours
Embryonic development is a process of profound physical transformation, one that has challenged researchers for centuries. How do genes and molecules control forces and tissue stiffness to orchestrate the emergence of form... more
Urbanization may hold key to tiger survival  PHYS.ORG · 4 hours
A new WCS-led study published in the journal Biological Conservation says the future of tigers in Asia is linked the path of demographic transition—for humans. The study marks the first-of-its-kind analysis that overlays human... more
Dry-cured ham bones -- a source of heart-healthy peptides?  SCIENCE DAILY · 4 hours
Drinking bone broth is a recent diet fad that proponents claim fights inflammation, eases joint pain and promotes gut health. Simmering animal bones in water releases collagen and other proteins... more
Simple rules predict and explain biological mutualism  PHYS.ORG · 5 hours
Scientists have long employed relatively simple guidelines to help explain the physical world, from Newton's second law of motion to the laws of thermodynamics. more
Ocean giant gets a health check: Combination blood, tissue test reveals whale shark diets  SCIENCE DAILY · 5 hours
Whale sharks, the world's largest fish, likely endure periods of starvation and may eat more plants than previously thought, according... more
Born to run: Just not on cocaine  SCIENCE DAILY · 6 hours
A study finds a surprising response to cocaine in a novel strain of mutant mice -- they failed to show hyperactivity seen in normal mice when given cocaine and didn't run around. In other... more
Differences among brain neurons that coincide with psychiatric conditions  SCIENCE DAILY · 6 hours
It's no surprise to scientists that variety is the very essence of biology, not just the seasoning, but most previous studies of key brain cells have found little variability in... more
Extracting functional mitochondria using microfluidics devices  PHYS.ORG · 7 hours
Mitochondria are dynamic, bioenergetic intracellular organelles, responsible for energy production via ATP production during respiration. They are involved in key cellular metabolic tasks that regulate vital physiological responses of cells, including cell signaling, cell differentiation and... more
What's in a species? Biologist helps determine wolf taxonomy  PHYS.ORG · 7 hours
It's right there in the name: The Endangered Species Act is meant to protect endangered species of animals. more
Ocean giant gets a health check: Combination blood, tissue test reveals whale shark diets  PHYS.ORG · 7 hours
Whale sharks, the world's largest fish, likely endure periods of starvation and may eat more plants than previously thought, according... more
Study shows no long-term removal of Neandertal DNA from Europeans  PHYS.ORG · 8 hours
A team of researchers at the Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology has found evidence that suggests there has been no long-term removal of Neandertal DNA from modern... more
Scientists identify two new species of fungi in retreating Arctic glacier  PHYS.ORG · 8 hours
Two new species of fungi have made an appearance in a rapidly melting glacier on Ellesmere Island in the Canadian Arctic, just west of Greenland. A... more
Dry-cured ham bones—a source of heart-healthy peptides?  PHYS.ORG · 8 hours
Drinking bone broth is a recent diet fad that proponents claim fights inflammation, eases joint pain and promotes gut health. Simmering animal bones in water releases collagen and other proteins into the broth that... more
Tanzania forest to be protected as a result of major scientific discoveries  PHYS.ORG · 8 hours
The United Republic of Tanzania has announced it will protect a globally unique forest ecosystem in East Africa, following research that demonstrated it is... more
Research advancing biological control of invasive plant species  PHYS.ORG · 8 hours
Academics from Royal Holloway, University of London in collaboration with The Centre for Agriculture and Bioscience (CABI) and the University of Reading are the first in Europe to study the ecological effects... more
11,500-year-old animal bones in Jordan suggest early dogs helped humans hunt  PHYS.ORG · 8 hours
Around 11,500 years ago, in what is now northeast Jordan, people began to live with dogs and may also have used them for hunting, according to... more
How Candida albicans exploits lack of oxygen to cause disease  PHYS.ORG · 8 hours
Scientists from Umeå university have shown that the yeast Candida albicans can modulate and adapt to low oxygen levels in different body niches to cause infection and to... more
Power stations driven by light  PHYS.ORG · 8 hours
Green plants, algae and some bacteria use sunlight to convert energy. The pigments in chlorophyll absorb electromagnetic radiation, which induces chemical reactions in electrons. These reactions take place in the nucleus of complex protein structures, referred to by... more
Mechanism helps explain the ear's exquisite sensitivity  PHYS.ORG · 8 hours
The human ear, like those of other mammals, is so extraordinarily sensitive that it can detect sound-wave-induced vibrations of the eardrum that move by less than the width of an atom. Now, researchers at... more
Western-led team may unlock rocky secrets of Mars  PHYS.ORG · 8 hours
Humankind may be able to reach further back into the history of its nearest planetary neighbour, unlocking the secrets to the evolution, climate, and habitability of Mars, thanks to the efforts of... more
Avoiding fossil fuel 'lock-in' could limit global temperature rise  PHYS.ORG · 8 hours
Research suggests there would be a 64 percent chance of limiting the increase in global average temperatures to 1.5°C above pre-industrial levels, if fossil fuel infrastructure was phased out immediately. more
Research finds large genome in tiny forest defoliator  NEWS MEDICAL · 9 hours
The European gypsy moth is perhaps the country's most famous invasive insect - a nonnative species accidentally introduced to North America in the 1860s when a few escaped from a breeding experiment... more
Researchers demonstrate how manganese produces parkinsonian syndrome  NEWS MEDICAL · 9 hours
Using X-ray fluorescence at synchrotrons DESY and ESRF, researchers in the Centre d'Etudes Nucléaires de Bordeaux Gradignan have demonstrated the consequences of a mutation responsible for a hereditary parkinsonian syndrome: accumulated manganese in the... more
Cybersecurity system evolves as it watches and learns from would-be hackers  PHYS.ORG · 9 hours
For hackers, the United States energy grid is a treasure trove of classified information with vast potential for profit and mayhem. To be effective, the power... more
Cobra Biologics announces appointment of Dr Darrell Sleep as Director of Innovation  NEWS MEDICAL · 10 hours
Cobra Biologics, an international CDMO for biologics and pharmaceuticals, today announced the appointment of Dr Darrell Sleep as Director of Innovation. more
Novel viral identification method developed  nanowerk · 10 hours
Researchers create a new nanodevice for influenza virus typing at the single-virion level by combining a nanopore sensor with peptide engineering. more
Salk team uses new model to study health effects of AMP-activated protein kinase  NEWS MEDICAL · 13 hours
The metabolic protein AMPK has been described as a kind of magic bullet for health. Studies in animal models have shown that... more
Truncal mutations study suggests new direction in origins of cancer  NEWS MEDICAL · 13 hours
Cancers most commonly arise because of a series of two to five mutations in different genes that combine to cause a tumor. more
'Junk' science? For some crabs at least, size does matter  PHYS.ORG · 13 hours
Size does matter, at least when it comes to some hermit crabs, who appear to have evolved longer penises so they can stay in their shells to protect... more
Poo transplant can successfully treat patients with ulcerative colitis  NEWS MEDICAL · 14 hours
Poo transplant or "Fecal microbiota transplantation" can successfully treat patients with ulcerative colitis, new research from the University of Adelaide shows. more
DNA may help predict potential life expectancy of a person, report scientists  NEWS MEDICAL · 14 hours
Scientists say they can predict whether a person can expect to live longer or die sooner than average, by looking at their DNA. more
New immune response regulators discovered  NEWS MEDICAL · 14 hours
The discovery was published in the new iScience journal for interdisciplinary research by Cell Press. The newly discovered regulatory proteins differ significantly from the regulators in mouse immune cells which have been reported earlier. Some of the proteins,... more
Researchers use gene-editing tool CRISPR/Cas9 to limit impact of parasitic diseases  NEWS MEDICAL · 14 hours
For the first time, researchers at the George Washington University, together with colleagues at institutes in Thailand, Australia, the U.K. and the Netherlands, and more, have... more
Effects of linoleic acid on the body are largely dependent on genes, shows study  NEWS MEDICAL · 14 hours
The effects of linoleic acid on the human body are largely dependent on genes, a new study from the University... more
FDA-approved drug hampers cancer metastasis in animal model, shows study  NEWS MEDICAL · 15 hours
For cancer to spread, it needs a hospitable environment in distant organs. This fertile "soil" can provide a home to circulating malignant cells. more
Scientists take another step in understanding bacteria that cause Salmonella epidemic  NEWS MEDICAL · 15 hours
Scientists at the University of Liverpool have taken another step forward in understanding the bacteria that are causing a devastating Salmonella epidemic currently killing around 400,000... more
Fortifying the future of cryptography  MIT · 16 hours
Vinod Vaikuntanathan aims to improve encryption in a world with growing applications and evolving adversaries. more
Researchers find how GREB1 gene promotes resistance to prostate cancer treatments  NEWS MEDICAL · 16 hours
Researchers have discovered how a gene involved in regulating hormone receptors may contribute to drug resistance in some prostate cancer patients. more
Study of mutation order may change understanding of how tumors develop  SCIENCE DAILY · 17 hours
Cancers most commonly arise because of a series of two to five mutations in different genes that combine to cause a tumor. Evidence from a growing... more
Study: 'Post-normal' science requires unorthodox communication strategies  SCIENCE DAILY · 17 hours
Proposals to fight malaria by 'driving' genes that slow its spread through mosquitoes is a high-risk, high-reward technology that presents a challenge to science journalists, according to a new report aimed at stimulating a... more
Genes reveal clues about people's potential life expectancy  SCIENCE DAILY · 17 hours
Scientists say they can predict whether a person can expect to live longer or die sooner than average, by looking at their DNA. Experts have analyzed the combined effect of genetic variations... more
Researchers discover how cancer cells avoid genetic meltdown  NEWS MEDICAL · 17 hours
A team of scientists have shed light on how cancer cell populations avoid genetic meltdown, despite the rapid accumulation of harmful mutations. more
Gene-editing tool CRISPR/Cas9 shown to limit impact of certain parasitic diseases  SCIENCE DAILY · 20 hours
Researchers have successfully used CRISPR/Cas9 to limit the impact of schistosomiasis and liver fluke infection, which affects more than a quarter of a billion people in... more
Unraveling threads of bizarre hagfish's explosive slime  SCIENCE DAILY · 20 hours
Biologists have modeled the hagfish's gag-inducing defense mechanism mathematically. more
Genome doubling, cell size and novelty  SCIENCE DAILY · 20 hours
Scientists have examined the effects of genome doubling on cell biology and the generation of novelty in plants. more
Idled farmland presents habitat restoration opportunities in San Joaquin Desert  SCIENCE DAILY · 20 hours
Most of the native habitat in California's San Joaquin Desert has been converted to row crops and orchards, leaving 35 threatened or endangered species confined to isolated patches... more
Mathematical model can improve our knowledge on cancer  SCIENCE DAILY · 20 hours
Researchers have developed a new mathematical tool, which can improve our understanding of what happens when cells lose their polarity (direction) in diseases such as cancer. The result is advancing our understanding... more
Helping anxious students excel on science exams  SCIENCE DAILY · 20 hours
A new study released today reveals that helping lower-income high school freshman to regulate their test-taking anxiety can cut their biology course failure rates in half. The study, published in Proceedings of the National... more
Effects of linoleic acid on inflammatory response depend on genes  SCIENCE DAILY · 20 hours
The effects of linoleic acid on the human body are largely dependent on genes, a new study shows. Linoleic acid is an essential fatty acid. People carrying different... more
Scientists have identified a bone marrow backup system  SCIENCE DAILY · 20 hours
New research has identified a backup for an important biological system -- the hematopoietic system, whose adult stem cells constantly replenish the body's blood supply. more
A microbial hot spring in your basement  SCIENCE DAILY · 20 hours
Microbes that thrive in some of the most extreme places on Earth have discovered another cozy place to live -- inside homes across the United States. more
MANF identified as a rejuvenating factor in parabiosis  SCIENCE DAILY · 21 hours
Older mice who are surgically joined with young mice in order to share a common bloodstream get stronger and healthier, making parabiosis one of the hottest topics in age research. Researchers now... more
Black mangroves' impact on the salt marsh food web  SCIENCE DAILY · 23 hours
Warmer temperatures are causing more tropical species to move northward. Among these are black mangroves, whose abundance is steadily increasing in the northern Gulf of Mexico. A new article examines... more
Why haven't cancer cells undergone genetic meltdowns?  PHYS.ORG · 23 hours
Cancer first develops as a single cell going rogue, with mutations that trigger aggressive growth at all costs to the health of the organism. But if cancer cells were accumulating harmful mutations faster than... more
Gene expression study sheds new light on African Salmonella  SCIENCE DAILY · 23 hours
Scientists have completed one of the largest bacterial comparative gene expression studies to date and taken another step forward in understanding the African Salmonella strain that is currently killing around... more
Potential therapeutic target for amyotrophic lateral sclerosis  SCIENCE DAILY · 23 hours
New research has revealed that the protein TDP-43 regulates a gene called Stathmin2 (STMN2). STMN2 shows promise as a therapeutic target and could be the first biomarker ALS, which is extremely difficult to diagnose... more
Genome doubling, cell size and novelty  PHYS.ORG · 24 hours
In the 2019 Coulter Review, "Polyploidy, the Nucleotype, and Novelty: The Impact of Genome Doubling on the Biology of the Cell," published in the International Journal of Plant Sciences (180:1-52), Jeff J. Doyle and Jeremy E.... more
Gene expression study sheds new light on African Salmonella  PHYS.ORG · 1 day
Scientists at the University of Liverpool have taken another step forward in understanding the bacteria that are causing a devastating Salmonella epidemic currently killing around 400,000 people each year in... more
Idled farmland presents habitat restoration opportunities in San Joaquin Desert  PHYS.ORG · 1 day
Most of the native habitat in California's San Joaquin Desert has been converted to row crops and orchards, leaving 35 threatened or endangered species confined to isolated patches... more
11,500-year-old animal bones in Jordan suggest early dogs helped humans hunt  SCIENCE DAILY · 1 day
11,500 years ago in what is now northeast Jordan, people began to live alongside dogs and may also have used them for hunting, a new study... more
Conserving large carnivores in Alaska requires overhauling state policy  PHYS.ORG · 1 day
Large carnivore management in Alaska should be based on rigorous science and monitoring of the status and trends of carnivore populations, according to a Perspective article published January 15 in... more
Here's the 1 Way We Can Avoid Climate Catastrophe, Scary Report Says  LIVE SCIENCE · 1 day
How can humans limit catastrophic climate change? We can phase out fossil-fuel emitters — such as coal-burning power plants, jet-fuel-slurping planes and gas-thirsty automobiles... more
Study examines black mangroves impact on the salt marsh food web  PHYS.ORG · 1 day
Warmer temperatures are causing more tropical species to move northward. Among these are black mangroves, whose abundance is steadily increasing in the northern Gulf of Mexico.... more
Scientists identify two new species of fungi in retreating Arctic glacier  SCIENCE DAILY · 1 day
Two new species of fungi have made an appearance in a rapidly melting glacier on Ellesmere Island in the Canadian Arctic, just west of Greenland. more
Genomic study finds Haida Gwaii's northern goshawks are highly distinct and at-risk  PHYS.ORG · 1 day
Haida Gwaii's small population of northern goshawks—already of great concern to conservationists—are the last remnant of a highly distinct genetic cluster of the birds,... more
Big genome found in tiny forest defoliator  PHYS.ORG · 1 day
The European gypsy moth (EGM) is perhaps the country's most famous invasive insect—a nonnative species accidentally introduced to North America in the 1860s when a few escaped from a breeding experiment in suburban Boston.... more
New study shows animals may get used to drones  PHYS.ORG · 1 day
A new study in Conservation Physiology shows that over time, bears get used to drones. Previous work indicated that animals behave fearfully or show a stress response near drone flights.... more
Hindering melanoma metastasis with an FDA-approved drug  SCIENCE DAILY · 1 day
A drug approved by the FDA 65 years ago for blood pressure control may aid in preventing cancer from spreading to distant organs. New research revealed that this drug disrupted formation of a fertile... more
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Robot recreates the walk of a 290-million-year-old creature
PHYS.ORG
Western-led team may unlock rocky secrets of Mars
PHYS.ORG
A four-legged robot hints at how ancient tetrapods walked
SCIENCE-NEWS
Time to step inside your DNA
PHYS.ORG
Immune system's front-line defense freezes bacteria in their tracks
PHYS.ORG
Atomic-scale capillaries block smallest ions, thanks to graphene
PHYS.ORG
Video: How compostable plastic works
PHYS.ORG
T. rex bite 'no match for a finch'
PHYS.ORG
Climate change: Effect on sperm could hold key to species extinction
PHYS.ORG
From dreams to fire: How Aboriginal Australians shaped biodiversity
PHYS.ORG
3-D scans of bat skulls help natural history museums open up dark corners of their collections
PHYS.ORG
Microbial aromas might save crops from drought
PHYS.ORG
Video: Artificial intelligence putting an end to poaching
PHYS.ORG
Video: Climate change—it (doesn't have to be) what's for dinner
PHYS.ORG
Computer program can translate a free-form 2-D drawing into a DNA structure
PHYS.ORG
Feisty hummingbirds prioritize fencing over feeding
SCIENCE DAILY
Using Assay Kits and Dyes to Advance Cell Biology Research
NEWS MEDICAL
We discovered more about the honeybee 'wake-up call'—and it could help save them
PHYS.ORG
Science News » 2,000 Human Brains Yield Clues to How Genes Raise Risk for Mental Illnesses
NIMH
Researchers make world's smallest tic-tac-toe game board with DNA
PHYS.ORG
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