Animals
Hue times two: A second look at the color of dinosaur eggs  PHYS.ORG · 2 hours
After garnering worldwide attention last year for her research on the origins of egg color in birds, Yale paleontologist Jasmina Wiemann has taken a... more
Study proves that brains of pairs of animals synchronize during social situations  NEWS MEDICAL · 6 hours
UCLA researchers have published a Cell study showing that the brains of pairs of animals synchronize during social situations. more
Research Details Response of Sagebrush to 2017 Solar Eclipse  ASTRO WATCH · 2 days
The total solar eclipse’s swath across Wyoming and the United States in August 2017 provided an opportunity for... more
From sheep and cattle to giraffes, genome study reveals evolution of ruminants  SCIENCE DAILY · 2 days
A detailed study of the genomes of 44 species of ruminants gives new insight into the evolution and success of these mammals. more
Could an Injection of Dead Cells Help Fight Cancer?  LIVE SCIENCE · 3 days
Dead cells in the body don't sound very useful, but they might provide a new way to fight cancer, a new study in animals suggests. more
NASA helps warn of harmful algal blooms in lakes, reservoirs  PHYS.ORG · 3 days
Harmful algal blooms can cause big problems in coastal areas and lakes across the United States. When toxin-containing aquatic organisms multiply and form a bloom, it can sicken... more
Emaciated polar bear found in Russia taken for treatment  PHYS.ORG · 3 days
An emaciated polar bear seen roaming around an industrial city in Russia far south of its normal sea ice hunting grounds is being transported to a zoo for examination and... more
Parasites ruin some finches’ songs by chewing through the birds’ beaks  SCIENCE-NEWS · 3 days
Parasitic fly larvae damage the beaks of Galápagos finches, changing their mating songs and possibly causing females to pick males of a different species. more
Dental microwear provides clues to dietary habits of lepidosauria  PHYS.ORG · 3 days
High-resolution microscopic images of the surface of dental enamel of lepidosauria, which is a subclass of reptile including monitor lizards, iguanas, lizards and tuatara, allow scientists to determine their dietary... more
Employees who often take their dog to work report 22% higher work satisfaction  PHYS.ORG · 3 days
Research from the University of Lincoln has shown employees who often bring their dogs to work report 22 percent higher satisfaction with... more
Study: Lethal plastic trash now common in Greece's whales  PHYS.ORG · 3 days
A study of whales and dolphins that have washed up dead in Greece over a 20-year period has found alarmingly high levels of plastic trash—mostly bags—in the animals' stomachs, which... more
The Ruminant Genome Project reveals the secret lives of deer  PHYS.ORG · 3 days
Three teams of researchers working independently have conducted three specific studies of ruminants—a class of mammals that obtains nutrients from plants by fermenting it in chambered stomachs. The... more
How Does the Summer Solstice Affect Animals?  LIVE SCIENCE · 3 days
Even if humans have trouble telling time in the "land of the midnight sun," many animals can adjust their schedules to the summer solstice. more
Bee populations in trouble following EPA pesticide decision  PHYS.ORG · 3 days
Just a few weeks ago, the Environmental Protection Agency announced it was pulling 12 products off the market that contained pesticides that were harmful to the honeybee. This week, the agency made... more
Curious cases of chemical cross-kingdom communication  PHYS.ORG · 3 days
All living things are divided into six kingdoms: plants, animals, fungi, protists (protozoa and some algae), and two types of bacteria—eubacteria and archaebacteria. more
Mammals and their relatives thrived, diversified during so-called 'Age of Dinosaurs'  PHYS.ORG · 3 days
Paleontologists are trying to dispel a myth about what life was like when dinosaurs roamed the Earth. The false narrative has wormed its way into books,... more
The extreme tactic of self-amputation means survival in the animal kingdom  PHYS.ORG · 3 days
Imagine yourself in the grips of a deadly predator. You see your life flash before your eyes: this looks like the end of the road. But... more
Legal weed’s a growing danger to dogs, so keep your canine out of your cannabis  NEWS MEDICAL · 3 days
It all started on a Tuesday night, when I came home from work to an unmistakable absence. My... more
Restaurants could be first to get genetically modified salmon  PHYS.ORG · 3 days
Inside an Indiana aquafarming complex, thousands of salmon eggs genetically modified to grow faster than normal are hatching into tiny fish. After growing to roughly 10 pounds (4.5 kilograms) in... more
Flying insects in hospitals harbor pathogenic bacteria  NEWS MEDICAL · 3 days
More than 50% of bacteria recovered from flying insects in a group of English hospitals were resistant to one or more antibiotics, posing a potential infection risk to patients, according to a new study. more
Machine learning identifies bugs that spread Chagas disease  NEWS MEDICAL · 4 days
New research from the University of Kansas shows machine learning is capable of identifying insects that spread the incurable disease called Chagas with high precision, based on ordinary digital photos. more
Animals may have more than one means of surviving hypoxia  SCIENCE DAILY · 4 days
A tidepool crustacean's ability to survive oxygen deprivation though it lacks a key set of genes raises the possibility that animals might have more ways of dealing with... more
Animals may have more than one means of surviving hypoxia  PHYS.ORG · 4 days
A tidepool crustacean's ability to survive oxygen deprivation though it lacks a key set of genes raises the possibility that animals might have more ways of dealing with... more
The why of puppy dog eyes, and measuring honesty on a global scale  Science Magazine · 4 days
How can you resist puppy dog eyes? This sweet, soulful look might very well have been bred into canines by their intended... more
The world’s fisheries are incredibly intertwined, thanks to baby fish  SCIENCE-NEWS · 4 days
A computer simulation reveals how one nation's management of its fish spawning grounds could significantly help or hurt another country's catch. more
Amyloid {beta} oligomers constrict human capillaries in Alzheimers disease via signaling to pericytes  Science Magazine · 4 days
Cerebral blood flow is reduced early in Alzheimer’s disease (AD). Because most of the vascular resistance within the brain is in capillaries,... more
The small world of global marine fisheries: The cross-boundary consequences of larval dispersal  Science Magazine · 4 days
Fish stocks are managed within national boundaries and by regional organizations, but the interdependence of stocks between these jurisdictions, especially as a... more
Direct arene C-H fluorination with 18F- via organic photoredox catalysis  Science Magazine · 4 days
Positron emission tomography (PET) plays key roles in drug discovery and development, as well as medical imaging. However, there is a dearth of efficient and simple radiolabeling methods... more
Large-scale ruminant genome sequencing provides insights into their evolution and distinct traits  Science Magazine · 4 days
The ruminants are one of the most successful mammalian lineages, exhibiting morphological and habitat diversity and containing several key livestock species. To better understand... more
Biological adaptations in the Arctic cervid, the reindeer (Rangifer tarandus)  Science Magazine · 4 days
The reindeer is an Arctic species that exhibits distinctive biological characteristics, for which the underlying genetic basis remains largely unknown. We compared the genomes of reindeer against those... more
Genetic basis of ruminant headgear and rapid antler regeneration  Science Magazine · 4 days
Ruminants are the only extant mammalian group possessing bony (osseous) headgear. We obtained 221 transcriptomes from bovids and cervids and sequenced three genomes representing the only two pecoran lineages that... more
New study maps how ocean currents connect the world's fisheries  PHYS.ORG · 4 days
A new study published in the journal Science finds that the world's marine fisheries form a single network, with over $10 billion worth of fish each year being... more
Research details response of sagebrush to 2017 solar eclipse  PHYS.ORG · 4 days
The total solar eclipse's swath across Wyoming and the United States in August 2017 provided an opportunity for scientists to study a variety of celestial and earthly phenomena, from learning... more
Spiders risk everything for love  PHYS.ORG · 4 days
University of Cincinnati biologist George Uetz long suspected the extravagant courtship dance of wolf spiders made them an easy mark for birds and other predators. more
Spiders risk everything for love  SCIENCE DAILY · 4 days
A biology study finds that blue jays can easily spot wolf spiders engaged in their courtship rituals. The results demonstrate the powerful influence of sexual selection. more
Russians capture hungry polar bear roaming Arctic city  PHYS.ORG · 4 days
Russian officials said Thursday that scientists have captured a hungry polar bear found roaming the streets of an Arctic city, hundreds of kilometres from its natural habitat, and would take it to... more
Earth's oldest animals could take trips  SCIENCE DAILY · 4 days
New research settles a longstanding debate about whether the most ancient animal communities were deliberately mobile. It turns out they were, because they were hungry. more
How in times of trouble animals also stand together  SCIENCE DAILY · 4 days
Faced with potential violence from rival factions, dwarf mongoose groupmates pull together and behave more cooperatively, according to new research. more
Successful 'alien' bird invasions are location dependent  SCIENCE DAILY · 4 days
Whether 'alien' bird species thrive in a new habitat depends more on the environmental conditions than the population size or characteristics of the invading bird species, finds a new study. more
Frustrated fish give up thanks to glia, not just neurons  PHYS.ORG · 4 days
Secured in place in a virtual-reality-equipped chamber, frustrated zebrafish just didn't want to swim anymore. more
Paleontologists Find Strange Microbes in Dinosaur Fossils  SCI-NEWS.COM · 4 days
In a new study published in the journal eLife, an international team of paleontologists looked for preserved collagen proteins and DNA in... more
Global data resource shows genetic diversity of chickens  PHYS.ORG · 4 days
A total of 174 chicken breeds are described in a publicly accessible database which scientists from the University of Göttingen and the Friedrich Loeffler Institute in Neustadt-Mariensee have built up in recent... more
Disrupting one gene could be first step toward treating honey bee parasite nosema ceranae  PHYS.ORG · 4 days
Agricultural Research Service (ARS) scientists have taken the first step towards a weapon against the major honey bee parasite Nosema... more
The return of the wolf: Wild cubs born in the Netherlands  PHYS.ORG · 4 days
Authorities say wolves are officially back in the Netherlands, two centuries after the animals were hunted to extinction in the country, after a pair produced a... more
Book presents the case that animals are just as important as people  PHYS.ORG · 4 days
In her new book, "Fellow Creatures: Our Obligations to the Other Animals," Arthur Kingsley Porter Professor of Philosophy Christine Korsgaard makes the case that... more
Fresh look at mysterious Nasca lines in Peru  PHYS.ORG · 4 days
A scientific approach has re-identified huge birds etched into the desert plains of southern Peru around 2,000 years ago. The birds appear to be exotic to the region, and further studies could... more
How in times of trouble animals also stand together  PHYS.ORG · 4 days
Faced with potential violence from rival factions, dwarf mongoose groupmates pull together and behave more co-operatively, according to new research by University of Bristol researchers published today. more
Dangerous brain parasite invades host cell, maintains steady nutrient supply  NEWS MEDICAL · 4 days
A team of researchers has found that a dangerous type of parasite that affects the brain, maintains a stable supply of essential nutrients as it replicates in the... more
New study proves some of Earth's oldest animals could take trips  PHYS.ORG · 4 days
New UC Riverside-led research settles a longstanding debate about whether the most ancient animal communities were deliberately mobile. It turns out they were, because they were... more
New York to get one of world's most ambitious carbon reduction plans  PHYS.ORG · 4 days
New York state lawmakers on Wednesday passed one of the world's most ambitious laws aimed at countering climate change, under which fossil fuel power... more
Eating fatty fish free of environmental pollutants could reduce type 2 diabetes risk  NEWS MEDICAL · 5 days
If the fatty fish we eat were free of environmental pollutants, it would reduce our risk of developing type 2 diabetes. more
The Wright Brothers and the First Airplane Flight  SPACE.COM · 5 days
The Wright Brothers’ first plane flight in Kitty Hawk lasted just 12 seconds in 1903, but Orville and Wilbur made history with their Wright Flyer. more
Adaptive switch to sexually dimorphic movements by partner-seeking termites  Science Magazine · 5 days
How should females and males move to search for partners whose exact location is unknown? Theory predicts that the answer depends on what they know about where targets can be... more
Gregarious suspension feeding in a modular Ediacaran organism  Science Magazine · 5 days
Reconstructing Precambrian eukaryotic paleoecology is pivotal to understanding the origins of the modern, animal-dominated biosphere. Here, we combine new fossil data from southern Namibia with computational fluid dynamics (CFD) to test between... more
Wind can prevent seabirds accessing their most important habitat  SCIENCE DAILY · 5 days
We marvel at flying animals because it seems like they can access anywhere, but a first study of its kind has revealed that wind can prevent seabirds from accessing the... more
Finding 'Nemo's' family tree of anemones  PHYS.ORG · 5 days
Thanks in part to the popular film Finding Nemo, clownfishes are well known to the public and well represented in scientific literature. But the same can't be said for the equally colorful sea anemones—venomous, tentacled animals—that... more
Successful 'alien' bird invasions are location dependent  PHYS.ORG · 5 days
Published today in Nature, researchers show that alien bird introductions are most successful in locations and climates similar to their native habitats and in places where other alien species are already established. more
Fatty fish without environmental pollutants protect against type 2 diabetes  SCIENCE DAILY · 5 days
If the fatty fish we eat were free of environmental pollutants, it would reduce our risk of developing type 2 diabetes. However, the pollutants in the fish have... more
Joint hypermobility related to anxiety, also in animals  SCIENCE DAILY · 5 days
Researchers report the first evidence in a non-human species, the domestic dog, of a relation between joint hypermobility and excitability: dogs with more joint mobility and flexibility tend to have more anxiety... more
Joint hypermobility related to anxiety, also in animals  PHYS.ORG · 5 days
The relation between collagen laxity and anxiety in humans is widely known, but this relation has never been observed before in other species. A team of researchers led by professors Jaume Fatjó... more
Owner training key to reducing risk of dog bite injuries  PHYS.ORG · 5 days
Dog attacks have been on the rise and it may the owners who need to go back to school. A new study published in Risk Analysis: An International... more
Research shows wind can prevent seabirds accessing their most important habitat  PHYS.ORG · 5 days
We marvel at flying animals because it seems like they can access anywhere, but a first study of its kind has revealed that wind can prevent... more
Antarctic marine life recovery following the dinosaurs' extinction  SCIENCE DAILY · 5 days
A new study shows how marine life around Antarctica returned after the extinction event that wiped out the dinosaurs. A team studied just under 3000 marine fossils collected from Antarctica to understand... more
Cat muzzles: cruel or useful?  PHYS.ORG · 5 days
It's not unusual to slap a muzzle on a dog if it's being aggressive or not keen on being given an injection, but a muzzle is not part of your average cat's wardrobe. Yet there they are online,... more
Hyenas Once Lived above Arctic Circle  SCI-NEWS.COM · 5 days
Paleontologists have found two fossilized teeth of extinct cursorial hyenas (genus Chasmaporthetes) in the remote Old Crow River region in northern Yukon Territory, Canada.... more
How personalities of wild small mammals affect forest structure  PHYS.ORG · 5 days
A mouse scampers through the forest, stopping suddenly at the sight of a tree seed on the ground. A potential meal. And a dilemma. more
Medical News Today: Are dogs better at detecting cancer 'than advanced technology?'  MNT · 5 days
In a new study, beagles were able to detect the presence of cancer with extremely high accuracy. Could their 'sniff skills' lead to novel... more
Pup fostering gives genetic boost to wild Mexican wolves  PHYS.ORG · 5 days
It's a carefully planned mission that involves coordination across state lines—from Mexican gray wolf dens hidden deep in the woods of New Mexico and Arizona to breeding facilities at zoos... more
Indonesia pet orangutans released back into the wild  PHYS.ORG · 5 days
The young orangutan looks back at her rescuers before clambering over her steel cage and into the trees, swinging from hand to hand and hanging upside down. more
Corsica's 'cat-fox': On the trail of what may be a new species  PHYS.ORG · 5 days
In the forest undergrowth of northern Corsica, two wildlife rangers open a cage to reveal a striped, tawny-coated animal, one of 16 felines known... more
Appearance of deep-sea fish does not signal upcoming earthquake in Japan  PHYS.ORG · 5 days
The unusual appearance of deep-sea fish like the oarfish or slender ribbonfish in Japanese shallow waters does not mean that an earthquake is about to occur,... more
Wearable device reveals how seals prepare for diving  SCIENCE DAILY · 6 days
A wearable noninvasive device based on near-infrared spectroscopy can be used to investigate blood volume and oxygenation patterns in freely diving marine mammals, according to a new study. more
Appearance of deep-sea fish does not signal upcoming earthquake in Japan  SCIENCE DAILY · 6 days
The unusual appearance of deep-sea fish like the oarfish or slender ribbonfish in Japanese shallow waters does not mean that an earthquake is about to occur,... more
Dogs Evolved Sad Eyes to Manipulate Their Human Companions, Study Suggests  LIVE SCIENCE · 6 days
You don't get to be man's best friend without copying a few of man's favorite facial expressions. more
To improve drones, researchers study flying insects  PHYS.ORG · 6 days
The unmanned aircraft known as drones, used by hobbyists, researchers and industry to take aerial images and perform other tasks, are growing ever more popular—and smaller. But that miniaturization, which has produced drones that... more
New insight from Great Barrier Reef coral provides correction factor to climate records  SCIENCE DAILY · 6 days
Newly developed geological techniques help uncover the most accurate and high-resolution climate records to date, according to a new study. The research... more
Monitoring biodiversity with sound: How machines can enrich our knowledge  SCIENCE DAILY · 6 days
Ecologists have long relied on their senses when it comes to recording animal populations and species diversity. However, modern programmable sound recording devices are now the better option... more
The fellowship of the wing: Pigeons flap faster to fly together  PHYS.ORG · 6 days
New research publishing June 18 in the open-access journal, PLOS Biology, led by Dr. Lucy Taylor from the University of Oxford's Department of Zoology now reveals... more
Wearable device reveals how seals prepare for diving  PHYS.ORG · 6 days
A wearable non-invasive device based on near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) can be used to investigate blood volume and oxygenation patterns in freely diving marine mammals, according to a study publishing June 18 in... more
Fossil teeth reveal ancient hyenas in the Arctic  SCIENCE DAILY · 6 days
Modern hyenas are known as hunters and scavengers in Asian and African ecosystems such as the savanna. But in ancient times, these powerful carnivores also roamed a very different landscape, inhabiting the... more
Dinosaur bones are home to microscopic life  SCIENCE DAILY · 6 days
Scientists went looking for preserved collagen, the protein in bone and skin, in dinosaur fossils. They didn't find the protein, but they did find huge colonies of modern bacteria living inside the dinosaur bones. more
Looming insect invasion threatens California wine and avocados  SCIENCE DAILY · 6 days
Researchers are testing whether a sesame seed-sized wasp can control a pest that could seriously damage California crops including wine, walnuts, and avocados. more
Monitoring biodiversity with sound: How machines can enrich our knowledge  PHYS.ORG · 6 days
For a long time, ecologists have relied on their senses when it comes to recording animal populations and species diversity. However, modern programmable sound recording devices are now... more
New insight from Great Barrier Reef coral provides correction factor to climate records  PHYS.ORG · 6 days
Newly developed geological techniques help uncover the most accurate and high-resolution climate records to date, according to a new study. The research... more
Medical News Today: Diagnosing IBD: Noninvasive method trialed in mice  MNT · 6 days
New research finds that immuno-PET imaging can accurately detect IBD in mice. The findings reveal information about specific inflammation mediators. more
Diagnosing IBD: Noninvasive method trialed in mice  MNT · 6 days
New research finds that immuno-PET imaging can accurately detect IBD in mice. The findings reveal information about specific inflammation mediators. more
3-D cranial reconstruction elucidates the evolution of new world monkeys  PHYS.ORG · 6 days
Researchers have used computed tomography (CT) scanning to examine and reconstruct cranial fossils belonging to two extinct species of monkey, Caipora bambuiorum and Cartelles coimbrafilhoi. The fossils were... more
Female rats face sex bias too  SCIENCE-NEWS · 6 days
In neurobiological studies, male lab animals tend to outnumber females, which are considered too hormonal. Scientists say it’s time for that myth to go. more
CatsDogsPrimates
How personalities of wild small mammals affect forest structure
PHYS.ORG
Looming insect invasion threatens California wine and avocados
SCIENCE DAILY
Renewable transportation fuels from water and carbon dioxide
PHYS.ORG
Lions sometimes suffer if they attack a porcupine. So why do they do it?
PHYS.ORG
Cementing our place in space
PHYS.ORG
New photography technique brings hidden history of fossils to light
PHYS.ORG
Watch an ant rip apart a spiderweb to rescue a sibling
Science Magazine
Spotted for the first time: a fish holding its breath underwater
Science Magazine
Watch an elephant ‘count’ simply by using its sense of smell
Science Magazine
Researchers strapped video cameras on 16 cats and let them do their thing. Here’s what they found
Science Magazine
Listen to the Void: Why Cosmic Nothingness Has So Much to Say
SPACE.COM
High-tech fishing gear could help save critically endangered right whales
PHYS.ORG
Iconic Australian working dog may not be part dingo after all
PHYS.ORG
When green monkeys spy a drone, they use their cousins' cry for 'eagle'
Science Magazine
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