Animals
Study findings have implications for meningococcal B vaccine programs globally  NEWS MEDICAL · 58 minutes
The results of the B Part of It study – the largest meningococcal B herd immunity study ever conducted – are published today in the New England Journal... more
Catnip: What do we know about the feline drug?  MNT · 4 hours
Catnip is the most famous stimulant for cats. How does it work, why does it not affect all cats, and are there any catnip alternatives? We investigate. more
Study provides key insights on potential origins of coronavirus outbreak in China  NEWS MEDICAL · 5 hours
Emerging viral infections--from bird flu to Ebola to Zika infections--pose major threats to global public health, and understanding their origins can help investigators design... more
Melting reveals drug targets in a living organism  SCIENCE DAILY · 8 hours
Developing new medicines and understanding how they target specific organs often gives a crucial advantage in the fight against human diseases. An international team has developed a technology to systematically identify drug... more
Collaboration reveals promising therapeutic strategy for osteoarthritis  NEWS MEDICAL · 8 hours
Osteoarthritis affects 240 million people worldwide and is one of the most common causes of disability in both humans and animals. more
Even after death, animals are important in ecosystems  SCIENCE DAILY · 8 hours
Animal carcasses play an important role in biodiversity and ecosystem functioning. Scientists have published these findings in PLOS ONE. Carcasses not only provide food for carrion-eating animals. Their nutrients also increase the... more
Coronavirus outbreak in China traced to snakes  SCIENCE DAILY · 8 hours
Emerging viral infections -- from bird flu to Ebola to Zika infections -- pose major threats to global public health, and understanding their origins can help investigators design defensive strategies against future outbreaks. A... more
Researchers confirm safety of cancer-specific PET probe in first-in-human clinical studies  NEWS MEDICAL · 9 hours
A group of researchers led by Assistant Professor WATABE Tadashi of the Graduate School of Medicine of Osaka University achieved the stable domestic production of automatic... more
Vomiting bumblebees show that sweeter is not necessarily better  SCIENCE DAILY · 9 hours
Animal pollinators support the production of three-quarters of the world's food crops, and many flowers produce nectar to reward the pollinators. A new study using bumblebees has found that the... more
Molecular identification of fungi microfossils in a Neoproterozoic shale rock  Science Magazine · 9 hours
Precambrian fossils of fungi are sparse, and the knowledge of their early evolution and the role they played in the colonization of land surface are limited. Here, we... more
Medical News Today: Catnip: What do we know about the feline drug?  MNT · 9 hours
Catnip is the most famous stimulant for cats. How does it work, why does it not affect all cats, and are there any catnip... more
Carcasses important for plants and insects in the Oostvaardersplassen Nature Reserve  PHYS.ORG · 9 hours
Allowing the carcasses of dead deer to remain in the Oostvaardersplassen Nature Reserve has a positive effect on biodiversity in the area. Not only do the... more
Neutron source enables a look inside dino eggs  SCIENCE DAILY · 11 hours
Did the chicks of dinosaurs from the group oviraptorid hatch from their eggs at the same time? This question can be answered by the length and arrangement of the embryo's bones, which... more
PET/MRI identifies potentially useful breast cancer biomarkers  NEWS MEDICAL · 11 hours
Researchers have identified several potentially useful breast cancer biomarkers that indicate the presence and risk of malignancy, according to new research published in the January issue of The Journal of Nuclear Medicine. more
Life aquatic for many spider species  SCIENCE DAILY · 11 hours
Researchers have found that nearly one fifth of all spider families are associated with saltwater or freshwater aquatic habitats. Their findings address the common misconception that all spiders dwell on land, and reveal surprising evolutionary pathways... more
Coating helps electronics stay cool by sweating  SCIENCE DAILY · 11 hours
Mammals sweat to regulate body temperature, and researchers are exploring whether our phones could do the same. The authors present a coating for electronics that releases water vapor to dissipate heat from running devices... more
Coating helps electronics stay cool by sweating  PHYS.ORG · 12 hours
Mammals sweat to regulate body temperature, and researchers from Shanghai Jiao Tong University in China are exploring whether our phones could do the same. In a study published January 22 in the journal Joule,... more
Zero-deforestation pledges to protect wildlife in oil palm  SCIENCE DAILY · 12 hours
New research has found that environmental efforts aimed at eliminating deforestation from oil palm production have the potential to benefit vulnerable tropical mammals. more
Researchers May Have Solved Mystery of Akrotiri’s Monkey Frescoes  SCI-NEWS.COM · 12 hours
The blue monkeys painted on the walls of Akrotiri on the Greek island of Santorini are among many... more
Neutron source enables a look inside dino eggs  PHYS.ORG · 13 hours
Did the chicks of dinosaurs from the group oviraptorid hatch from their eggs at the same time? This question can be answered by the length and arrangement of the embryo's bones, which... more
Get children into the real world for effective bushfire education  PHYS.ORG · 13 hours
Children and young people have been deeply impacted by the current bushfire crisis. Schools have been destroyed and thousands of houses have burnt down. Hazardous air pollution is... more
Inspiring STEM careers through a hands-on Everglades microbiome study  PHYS.ORG · 13 hours
The Florida Everglades evokes images of fanboats skimming over swamps, while alligators peer through the waters and clouds of insects hover just above. Described as a "river of grass" that... more
The yellow black-faced triplefin deflects sunlight to break predator camouflage  PHYS.ORG · 14 hours
Small fish use light for active sensing to detect potential predators. The yellow black-faced triplefin (Tripterygion delaisi) can reflect downwelling sunlight sideways with its iris, illuminating its immediate... more
Melting reveals drug targets in a living organism  PHYS.ORG · 14 hours
Developing new medicines and understanding how they target specific organs often gives a crucial advantage in the fight against human diseases. An international team led by researchers at the European Molecular Biology... more
Warm-blooded crocs thrived in Jurassic cold snap  PHYS.ORG · 14 hours
They are revered throughout nature as chilling predators … now research shows crocodiles have not always been the cold-blooded creatures they are today. more
Ancient Assyrian rock carvings in Iraq show procession of gods riding mythical animals  LIVE SCIENCE · 16 hours
Stunning ancient rock carvings that portray an Assyrian king paying homage to his gods amid a procession of mythical animals have been... more
Caterpillar loss in tropical forest linked to extreme rain, temperature events  PHYS.ORG · 20 hours
Using a 22-year dataset of plant-caterpillar-parasitoid interactions collected within a patch of protected Costa Rican lowland Caribbean forest, scientists report declines in caterpillar and parasitoid diversity... more
Novel composite could help to reduce foodborne illness outbreaks  NEWS MEDICAL · 1 day
A novel composite film -- created by the bonding of an antimicrobial layer to conventional, clear polyethylene plastic typically used to vacuum-package foods such as meat and fish -- could... more
Vomiting bumblebees show that sweeter is not necessarily better  PHYS.ORG · 1 day
Animal pollinators support the production of three-quarters of the world's food crops, and many flowers produce nectar to reward the pollinators. A new study using bumblebees has found that the... more
'Ancient' cellular discovery key to new cancer therapies  SCIENCE DAILY · 1 day
Researchers have uncovered a metabolic system which could lead to new strategies for therapeutic cancer treatment. A team has found a link between a metabolic system in a yeast, and now mammals,... more
How fruit flies flock together in orderly clusters  SCIENCE DAILY · 1 day
Opposing desires to congregate and maintain some personal space drive fruit flies to form orderly clusters, according to a new study. more
Novel composite antimicrobial film could take a bite out of foodborne illnesses  SCIENCE DAILY · 1 day
A novel composite film -- created by the bonding of an antimicrobial layer to conventional, clear polyethylene plastic typically used to vacuum-package foods such... more
A chronicle of giant straight-tusked elephants  SCIENCE DAILY · 1 day
About 800,000 years ago, the giant straight-tusked elephant Palaeoloxodon migrated out of Africa and became widespread across Europe and Asia. more
A model ecosystem fish story  SCIENCE DAILY · 1 day
Have I got a fish story for you. Any angler beginning a yarn like that usually ends up spinning a tall tale, an exaggeration or bald-faced lie. Researchers, however, have demonstrated that anglers can produce accurate and complex... more
A model ecosystem fish story  PHYS.ORG · 1 day
Have I got a fish story for you. Any angler beginning a yarn like that usually ends up spinning a tall tale, an exaggeration or bald-faced lie. more
Insect bites and warmer climate means double-trouble for plants  SCIENCE DAILY · 1 day
Scientists think that current models are incomplete and that we may be underestimating crop losses. A new study shows that infested tomato plants, in their efforts to fight off caterpillars,... more
How fruit flies flock together in orderly clusters  PHYS.ORG · 1 day
Opposing desires to congregate and maintain some personal space drive fruit flies to form orderly clusters, according to a study published today in eLife. more
Insect bites and warmer climate means double-trouble for plants  PHYS.ORG · 1 day
Recent models are telling us that, as our climate warms up, herbivores and pests will cause increased damage to agricultural crops. One study predicted that crop yield lost to insects... more
The little auks that lived in the Pacific  PHYS.ORG · 1 day
Findings from a 700,000-year-old fossil bone indicate that a close relative of the most abundant seabird species in the North Atlantic, the modern dovekie, or 'little auk,' used to thrive in the... more
Banning food waste: Lessons for rural America  PHYS.ORG · 1 day
While Vermonters support banning food waste from landfills—and a whopping 72 percent already compost or feed food scraps to their pets or livestock—few say they are willing to pay for curbside composting pick-up, new... more
Insecticides are becoming more toxic to honey bees  SCIENCE DAILY · 1 day
Researchers discover that neonicotinoid seed treatments are driving a dramatic increase in insecticide toxicity in U.S. agricultural landscapes, despite evidence that these treatments have little to no benefit in many crops. more
TB bacteria survive in amoebae found in soil  SCIENCE DAILY · 1 day
Scientists have discovered that the bacterium which causes bovine TB can survive and grow in small, single-celled organisms found in soil and dung. It is believed that originally the bacterium evolved to... more
Parrots collaborate with invisible partners  SCIENCE DAILY · 1 day
New study shows that peach-fronted conures have a surprisingly advanced talent for collaboration when it comes to finding food. This is important knowledge for biologists working with conservation of wild bird populations. more
New study reveals a life aquatic for many spider species  PHYS.ORG · 2 days
From sea shores to salt flats, a high incidence of spiders spin a life in or around water. Researchers at the California Academy of Sciences and William Paterson... more
Cave fights for food: Voracious spiders vs. assassin bugs  PHYS.ORG · 2 days
Killing and eating of potential competitors, also known as intraguild predation, is a rare event that occurs only in specific situations such as severe scarcity of food resources, resulting in... more
Research shows potential for zero-deforestation pledges to protect wildlife in oil palm  PHYS.ORG · 2 days
New research has found that environmental efforts aimed at eliminating deforestation from oil palm production have the potential to benefit vulnerable tropical mammals. more
Lizard and snake size unrelated to climate  PHYS.ORG · 2 days
For well over a century, scientists have thought climate is a key factor affecting the evolution of animal body sizes. However, a recent study has shown that, for squamates, a group of reptiles that... more
Insecticides becoming more toxic to honey bees  PHYS.ORG · 2 days
During the past 20 years, insecticides applied to U.S. agricultural landscapes have become significantly more toxic—over 120-fold in some midwestern states—to honey bees when ingested, according to a team of researchers, who identified rising... more
'Shazam for fish': Acoustic monitoring a window into health of waterways  PHYS.ORG · 2 days
Listening to the environment—singing birds and chirping crickets—is increasingly used as a means of monitoring change in ecosystems. Together with two colleagues from Melbourne and Paris,... more
Five ways to turn carbon dioxide from pollution to a valuable product  PHYS.ORG · 2 days
It's far easier to avoid burning fossil fuels than it is to clean up CO2 emissions once they're in the Earth's atmosphere. But the... more
Conservation scientists are grieving after the bushfires—but we must not give up  PHYS.ORG · 2 days
That a billion animals may die as a result of this summer's fires has horrified the world. For many conservation biologists and land managers,... more
Many of our plants and animals have adapted to fires, but now the fires are changing  PHYS.ORG · 2 days
Australia is a land that has known fire. Our diverse plant and animal species have become... more
New technology systematically identifies drug targets in living animals  NEWS MEDICAL · 2 days
Developing new medicines and understanding how they target specific organs often gives a crucial advantage in the fight against human diseases. more
Novel composite antimicrobial film could take a bite out of foodborne illnesses  PHYS.ORG · 2 days
A novel composite film—created by the bonding of an antimicrobial layer to conventional, clear polyethylene plastic typically used to vacuum-package foods such as meat... more
Modified plants to curb climate change  PHYS.ORG · 2 days
Each year, an average of 120 gigatons of carbon dioxide (CO2) worldwide is released through soil and vegetation respiration. Plants are capable of taking in nearly 123 gigatons through photosynthesis in the same period. But as... more
A chronicle of giant straight-tusked elephants  PHYS.ORG · 2 days
About 800,000 years ago, the giant straight-tusked elephant Palaeoloxodon migrated out of Africa and became widespread across Europe and Asia. more
EXPLORER scanner captures real-time videos of blood flow and heart function  NEWS MEDICAL · 2 days
Positron Emission Tomography, or PET scanning, a technique for tracing metabolic processes in the body, has been widely applied in clinical diagnosis and research spanning physiology,... more
Study uncovers anticancer potential of many non-oncology drugs  NEWS MEDICAL · 2 days
Drugs for diabetes, inflammation, alcoholism -- and even for treating arthritis in dogs -- can also kill cancer cells in the lab, according to a study by scientists at the Broad Institute... more
New uses for old medicines  NEWS MEDICAL · 2 days
It turns out that in the rush to invent new drugs to treat cancers, scientists may have overlooked some obvious possibilities of existing drugs currently being used for other diseases. A new study says that therapies for diabetes,... more
Wolf Puppies Play Fetch Too, Researchers Find  SCI-NEWS.COM · 2 days
In a series of experiments, a duo of researchers from the Department of Zoology at Stockholm University has observed eight-week-old wolf puppies... more
On the edge between science and art: Historical biodiversity data from Japanese 'gyotaku'  SCIENCE DAILY · 2 days
Japanese cultural art of 'gyotaku,' which means 'fish impression' or 'fish rubbing,' captures accurate images of fish specimens. It has been used... more
Dozens of non-oncology drugs can kill cancer cells  SCIENCE DAILY · 2 days
Researchers tested approximately 4,518 drug compounds on 578 human cancer cell lines and found nearly 50 that have previously unrecognized anti-cancer activity. These drugs have been used to treat conditions such as... more
Fossils of Earliest Known Scorpion Discovered  SCI-NEWS.COM · 2 days
The exceptionally preserved fossils of the oldest species of scorpion ever found have been unearthed in Wisconsin, the United States. The newly-discovered ancient scorpion... more
New Species of Titi Monkey Discovered in Brazil  SCI-NEWS.COM · 3 days
An international team of researchers has discovered a new species of titi monkey living in the forests of Brazil. Titi... more
Can ecosystems recover from dramatic losses of biodiversity?  PHYS.ORG · 3 days
The sheer scale and intensity of the Australian bushfire crisis have led to apocalyptic scenes making the front pages of newspapers the world over. An estimated 10 million hectares (100,000 sq km)... more
Tuberculosis bacteria survive in amoebae found in soil  PHYS.ORG · 3 days
Scientists from the University of Surrey and University of Geneva have discovered that the bacterium which causes bovine TB can survive and grow in small, single-celled organisms found in soil and dung.... more
6 million hectares of threatened species habitat up in smoke  PHYS.ORG · 3 days
More than one billion mammals, birds, and reptiles across eastern Australia are estimated to have been affected by the current fire catastrophe. more
Jumbo undertaking: Elephant milk under the microscope  PHYS.ORG · 3 days
On a recent sunny day at the San Diego Zoo Safari Park, a team of specialized zookeepers collected breast milk samples from two female elephants nursing their 1-year-old calves. Unlike the mechanical breast pumps... more
Australia's threatened bats need protection from white-nose syndrome  PHYS.ORG · 3 days
We already know how deadly this summer's fires have been for mammals, birds, and reptiles across Australia. But beyond this bushfire season, many of those same species—including our bats, which make up... more
Are Birds Dinosaurs?  LIVE SCIENCE · 3 days
Modern birds can trace their origins to theropods, a branch of mostly meat-eaters on the dinosaur family tree. more
Particle physicists formulate future of the field  CERN · 3 days
Particle physicists formulate future of the field Matthew Chalmers katebrad Mon, 01/20/2020 - 13:12 Physikzentrum Bad Honnef, venue for the drafting session of the European strategy for particle physics. (Image credit: Wikicommons/Birds-eye) Today, senior... more
Threatened species hit hard by Australia's bushfires  PHYS.ORG · 3 days
Australia's bushfires have burned more than half the known habitat of 100 threatened plants and animals, including 32 critically endangered species, the government said Monday. more
Fish oil supplements could benefit testicular function in healthy men finds study  NEWS MEDICAL · 3 days
A large Danish study has shown that fish oil supplements taken by healthy men of the reproductive age could help improve their testicular function... more
Czechs detect bird flu as new Europe outbreak feared  PHYS.ORG · 4 days
A highly contagious bird flu has been confirmed at a Czech farm, officials said Saturday after a French farm union warned of the risk of a new outbreak in Europe. more
Scientists seek rare species survivors amid Australia flames  PHYS.ORG · 4 days
Australia's unprecedented wildfires season has so far charred 40,000 square miles (104,000 square kilometers) of brushland, rainforests, and national parks—killing by one estimate more than a billion wild animals. Scientists fear some... more
Male sparrows are less intimidated by the songs of aging rivals  SCIENCE DAILY · 5 days
Few singers reach their sunset years with the same voice they had in younger days. Songbirds are no different. New research reveals that elderly swamp sparrows... more
'Dancing dragon' shows feathers grew differently on dinosaurs and birds  REUTERS · 5 days
An exquisite fossil of a fierce little Chinese dinosaur dubbed the "dancing dragon" that lived 120... more
Spider-Man-style robotic graspers defy gravity  SCIENCE DAILY · 5 days
Traditional methods of vacuum suction and previous vacuum suction devices cannot maintain suction on rough surfaces due to vacuum leakage, which leads to suction failure. Researchers have developed a zero-pressure difference method to enhance the development of vacuum... more
Spider-Man-style robotic graspers defy gravity  PHYS.ORG · 5 days
Specially designed vacuum suction units allow humans to climb walls. Scientists have developed a suction unit that can be used on rough surfaces, no matter how textured, and that has applications in the development of climbing robots and... more
Spider-Man-style robotic graspers defy gravity  nanowerk · 5 days
Scientists have developed a suction unit that can be used on rough surfaces, no matter how textured, and that has applications in the development of climbing robots and robotic arms with grasping capabilities. more
Programmable nests for cells  nanowerk · 5 days
Researchers developed novel composites of DNA, silica particles, and carbon nanotubes - properties can be tailored to various applications. more
Sea lions yawn due to anxiety  PHYS.ORG · 6 days
Researchers have analysed these animals for 14 months, concluding that the frequency of their yawns increases immediately after a social conflict among members of the group. more
Programmable nests for cells  PHYS.ORG · 6 days
Using DNA, small silica particles, and carbon nanotubes, researchers of Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT) have developed novel programmable nanocomposites that can be tailored to various applications and programmed to degrade quickly and gently. For medical applications, they can create... more
Battling longer, more intense fire seasons  PHYS.ORG · 6 days
Fires in Australia have been burning for months. At least 28 people and hundreds of thousands of animals have died, and more than 15 million acres have been destroyed as firefighters work to squelch the blaze.... more
How grass dances with fire  PHYS.ORG · 6 days
There's a long-held myth that Johannesburg is the globe's largest urban forest, resplendent with an annual purple Jacaranda show. But before the planting of these (alien) trees for timber during the Gold Rush in the 19th Century, Johannesburg... more
Lessons on how to effectively tackle insect invasions  PHYS.ORG · 6 days
Kenyan food production and grazing land is under threat from a huge desert locust invasion. The insects are currently in two counties in northern Kenya and are now spreading to other Kenyan... more
Plant organ growth is not so different from animals  PHYS.ORG · 6 days
For a long time, researchers assumed that cell death occurs mainly during animal organ growth, but not in plant organs. A research group led by Hannele Tuominen from UPSC has... more
Human ancestors may have eaten hard plant tissues without damaging teeth  SCIENCE DAILY · 6 days
Hard plant foods may have made up a larger part of early human ancestors' diet than currently presumed, according to a new experimental study of modern... more
Study traces evolution of acoustic communication  PHYS.ORG · 6 days
Imagine taking a hike through a forest or a stroll through a zoo and not a sound fills the air, other than the occasional chirp from a cricket. No birds singing, no tigers roaring, no monkeys... more
New dog, old tricks? Stray dogs can understand human cues  PHYS.ORG · 6 days
If you have a dog, hopefully you're lucky enough to know that they are highly attuned to their owners and can readily understand a wide range of commands... more
Menstruation huts destroyed in Nepal, where exile persists  ABC NEWS · 6 days
Authorities are knocking down tiny huts in western Nepal where women have been exiled during menstruation and exposed to cold weather and threats from animals and even sexual assaults more
Mobile protected areas needed to protect biodiversity in the high seas  SCIENCE DAILY · 6 days
As the United Nations rewrites the laws of the high seas, the new document should anticipate emerging technologies that allow protected areas to move as animals... more
'PigeonBot' Brings Robots Closer To Birdlike Flight  NPR · 6 days
Birds change the shape of their wings far more than planes. The complexities of bird flight have posed a major design challenge for scientists trying to translate the way birds fly into robots. more
'PigeonBot' Brings Robots Closer To Bird-Like Flight  NPR · 6 days
Birds change the shape of their wings far more than planes. The complexities of bird flight have posed a major design challenge for scientists trying to translate the way birds fly into robots. more
New model shows how crop rotation helps combat plant pests  SCIENCE DAILY · 6 days
A new computational model shows how different patterns of crop rotation -- planting different crops at different times in the same field -- can impact long-term yield when... more
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