Animals
In Sweden's Arctic, global warming threatens reindeer herds  PHYS.ORG · 1 hour
Thick reindeer fur boots and a fur hat covering most of his face shielded Niila Inga from minus 20-degree Celsius (minus 4-degree Fahrenheit) winds as he raced his snowmobile up to a... more
Revered by Aztecs, Mexican hairless dog in style again in hipster era  PHYS.ORG · 1 hour
At a stately museum in Mexico City, priceless paintings by Frida Kahlo and Diego Rivera share pride of place with an unruly pack of... more
First Pig-Monkey Chimeras Were Just Created in China  LIVE SCIENCE · 14 hours
What’s got the body of a piglet and cells from a monkey? This pig-monkey chimera. more
Medical News Today: Researchers find over 40 new species of fish in one lake  MNT · 15 hours
Researchers have found dozens of new fish species in just one African lake — a feat of diversity. The find... more
Wing genes responsible for tiny treehopper's extraordinary helmet  SCIENCE DAILY · 15 hours
Why the treehopper developed the enlarged, three-dimensional hood ornament that distinguishes it from the rest of the insect world remains a mystery to scientists, though it's theorized that mimicry or camouflage designed... more
Wing genes responsible for tiny treehopper's extraordinary helmet: study  PHYS.ORG · 16 hours
They sport some of the most impressive headgear in the insect world, yet they're no bigger than a kernel of corn. more
480-million-year-old fossils reveal sea lilies' ancient roots  PHYS.ORG · 16 hours
Sea lilies, despite their name, aren't plants. They're animals related to starfish and sea urchins, with long feathery arms resting atop a stalk that keeps them anchored to the ocean floor. Sea lilies have... more
Dogs Understand Spoken Words Better than We Thought  SCI-NEWS.COM · 20 hours
Dogs are able to listen to different people saying the same word and recognize it as the same word, ignoring... more
Boy oh boy! Twin male pandas charm Berlin zoo  PHYS.ORG · 21 hours
The cuteness level at Berlin Zoo doubled on Monday when a pair of twin panda cubs made their public debut, with the zoo revealing the cuddly bundles of fur were... more
SpaceX delivers 'mighty mice,' worms, robot to space station  PHYS.ORG · 2 days
SpaceX made an early holiday delivery to the International Space Station on Sunday, dropping off super muscular "mighty mice," pest-killing worms and a smart, empathetic robot. more
Israeli fish farmers give peckish pelicans free lunch  PHYS.ORG · 2 days
Migratory pelicans have long raided Israeli fish farms, which try to deter them with loudspeakers, laser beams and by firing blank rounds from rifles. more
Island 'soundscapes' show potential for evaluating recovery of nesting seabirds  SCIENCE DAILY · 3 days
An important tool for monitoring seabird populations involves acoustic sensors deployed at nesting sites to record sounds over long periods of time. But analysis of the recordings to... more
Fossil fuel groups 'destroying' climate talks: NGOs  PHYS.ORG · 3 days
Oil and gas groups were accused Saturday of seeking to influence climate talks in Madrid by paying millions in sponsorship and sending dozens of lobbyists to delay what scientists say is a necessary and... more
New marker for insecticide resistance in malaria-carrying mosquitoes  SCIENCE DAILY · 4 days
Researchers have genetically modified malaria carrying mosquitoes in order to demonstrate the role of particular genes in conferring insecticide resistance. more
A minimally invasive lens-free computational microendoscope  Science Magazine · 4 days
Ultra-miniaturized microendoscopes are vital for numerous biomedical applications. Such minimally invasive imagers allow for navigation into hard-to-reach regions and observation of deep brain activity in freely moving animals. Conventional solutions use distal microlenses. However, as lenses... more
New Cretaceous-Period Mammal Unveiled  SCI-NEWS.COM · 4 days
Paleontologists have discovered the remains of a previously unknown symmetrodont mammal that lived alongside dinosaurs in what is now China. The fossils provide a record of the final... more
EU bans controversial pesticide  PHYS.ORG · 4 days
A controversial pesticide linked to developmental problems in humans will be definitively banned in the EU in 2020 after a vote on Friday by member states, the European Commission said. more
Island 'soundscapes' show potential for evaluating recovery of nesting seabirds  PHYS.ORG · 4 days
Nocturnal seabirds nesting on remote islands can be extremely difficult to study. An increasingly important tool for monitoring these populations involves acoustic sensors deployed in the field to... more
Fish scattering sound waves has impact on aquaculture  PHYS.ORG · 4 days
Schools of fish can scatter sound waves, which has impacts on fish farming. Fisheries acoustics have been studied for over 40 years to assess biomass and optimize aquaculture applications. more
The Coastal Communities Network – a force for nature  PHYS.ORG · 4 days
At Fauna & Flora International (FFI) we strongly believe that the people best placed to protect biodiversity—and the resources it provides—are those who live closest to it. That's why we... more
Why some scientists want to rewrite the history of how we learned to walk  PHYS.ORG · 4 days
It's not often that a fossil truly rewrites human evolution, but the recent discovery of an ancient extinct ape has... more
US tweaks restrictions on 'cyanide bomb' anti-predator devices  PHYS.ORG · 4 days
The US announced slightly stricter rules Thursday on the use of devices called "cyanide bombs," which are meant to protect livestock from wild predators, after the government reinstated their use in August. more
Researchers draw an evolutionary link between pregnancy and cancer malignancy  NEWS MEDICAL · 4 days
A UConn School of Dental Medicine researcher used pregnancy to unlock a missing link between various species of mammals and cancer malignancy--fundamentally changing the way we look at... more
Only 'cat whisperers' can read felines' facial expressions  MNT · 4 days
New research finds that most people are unable to read cats' facial expressions, apart from a small group of so-called cat whisperers. more
Behavioral interventions may be as effective at reducing food intake as anorectic drugs  SCIENCE DAILY · 4 days
Simulations predict that behavioral interventions such as imposing strict no-food restrictions after meals can be as effective as strong anorectic drugs in... more
Open source EEG visualization tool  SCIENCE DAILY · 4 days
Researchers have developed a free open source computer program that can be used to create visual and quantitative representations of brain electrical activity in laboratory animals in hopes of developing countermeasures for opioid use disorder. more
Dead birds forecast unexpected impact of climate change  NEWS MEDICAL · 4 days
A new study published Wednesday in the journal Ecology Letters reports that its look at the physical data of thousands of dead American migratory birds collected off the busy streets of high-rise... more
Academy scientists describe 71 new species in 2019  PHYS.ORG · 5 days
In 2019, researchers at the California Academy of Sciences added 71 new plant and animal species to our family tree, enriching our understanding of Earth's complex web of life and strengthening our... more
Medical News Today: Only 'cat whisperers' can read felines' facial expressions  MNT · 5 days
New research finds that most people are unable to read cats' facial expressions, apart from a small group of so-called cat whisperers. more
New Fossil Fills Gap in Evolution of Comma Shrimps  SCI-NEWS.COM · 5 days
A new species of comma shrimp that lived during the mid-Cretaceous period, between 95 and 90 million years... more
Debating lab monkey retirement, and visiting a near-Earth asteroid  Science Magazine · 5 days
After their life as research subjects, what happens to lab monkeys? Some are euthanized to complete the research, others switch to new research projects, and some retire from lab life.... more
Dull teeth, long skulls, specialized bites evolved in unrelated plant-eating dinosaurs  SCIENCE DAILY · 5 days
Herbivorous dinosaurs evolved many times during the 180 million-year Mesozoic era, and while they didn't all evolve to chew, swallow, and digest their food in the... more
Magnetic nano-sized disks could restore function for Lou Gehrig’s disease patients  NEWS MEDICAL · 5 days
For decades the renowned English physicist Stephen Hawking lived with a motor neuron disease until his death last year. more
LSTM researchers genetically modified malaria carrying mosquitoes  NEWS MEDICAL · 5 days
Researchers at LSTM have genetically modified malaria carrying mosquitoes in order to demonstrate the role of particular genes in conferring insecticide resistance. more
Integrated hearing and chewing modules decoupled in a Cretaceous stem therian mammal  Science Magazine · 5 days
Based on multiple 3D skeletal specimens we report a new Cretaceous stem therian mammal that displays decoupling of hearing and chewing apparatuses and functions.... more
Extinction filters mediate the global effects of habitat fragmentation on animals  Science Magazine · 5 days
Habitat loss is the primary driver of biodiversity decline worldwide, but the effects of fragmentation (the spatial arrangement of remaining habitat) are debated. We tested the... more
Functional diversity of human intrinsically photosensitive retinal ganglion cells  Science Magazine · 5 days
Intrinsically photosensitive retinal ganglion cells (ipRGCs) are a subset of cells that participate in image-forming and non–image-forming visual responses. Although both functional and morphological subtypes of ipRGCs have been described... more
New cretaceous mammal provides evidence for separation of hearing and chewing modules  PHYS.ORG · 5 days
A joint research team led by Mao Fangyuan from the Institute of Vertebrate Paleontology and Paleoanthropology (IVPP) of the Chinese Academy of Sciences and... more
Study reveals multiple correlations between brain complexity and locomotion pattern in vertebrates  NEWS MEDICAL · 5 days
Researchers at the Institute of Biotechnology, University of Helsinki, have uncovered multi-level relationships between locomotion - the ways animals move - and brain architecture,... more
How flowers adapt to their pollinators  PHYS.ORG · 5 days
Flowering plants are characterized by an astonishing diversity of flowers of different shapes and sizes. This diversity has arisen in adaptation to selection imposed by different pollinators including, among others, bees, flies, butterflies, hummingbirds, bats or... more
Respiration key to increase oxygen in the brain  SCIENCE DAILY · 5 days
Contrary to accepted knowledge, blood can bring more oxygen to mice brains when they exercise because the increased respiration packs more oxygen into the hemoglobin, according to an international team of researchers... more
Multiple correlations between brain complexity and locomotion pattern in vertebrates  PHYS.ORG · 5 days
Researchers at the Institute of Biotechnology, University of Helsinki, have uncovered multi-level relationships between locomotion—the ways animals move—and brain architecture, using high-definition 3-D models of lizard and snake... more
Dull teeth, long skulls, specialized bites evolved in unrelated plant-eating dinosaurs  PHYS.ORG · 5 days
Herbivorous dinosaurs evolved many times during the 180 million-year Mesozoic era, and while they didn't all evolve to chew, swallow, and digest their food in the... more
Can a single-celled organism 'change its mind'? New study says yes  PHYS.ORG · 5 days
Once, single-cell life claimed sole dominion over the earth. For some three billion years, unfathomable generations of unicellular organisms ate, grew and reproduced among only each... more
How our single-celled relatives package their DNA  PHYS.ORG · 5 days
A group of single-celled organisms organises its DNA in a similar way to higher organisms such as plants, animals, and fungi. However, the way packaged DNA is read out differs between the two related... more
Scientists: Insect populations are shrinking—here are six ways to help  PHYS.ORG · 5 days
Are you planning a big garden clean-up this summer, or stocking up on fly spray to keep bugs at bay? Before you do, it's worth considering the damage... more
Self-healing liquid brings new life to battery alternative  PHYS.ORG · 5 days
Rechargeable lithium-ion (Li-ion) batteries are a revolutionary technology, found in everything from cellphones to cars. Their ubiquity and role in breaking dependence on fossil fuels earned a trio of researchers this year's... more
Scientists identify new marker for insecticide resistance in malaria mosquitoes  PHYS.ORG · 5 days
Researchers at LSTM have genetically modified malaria carrying mosquitoes in order to demonstrate the role of particular genes in conferring insecticide resistance. more
Should aging lab monkeys be retired to sanctuaries?  Science Magazine · 5 days
Biomedical researchers are increasingly interested in retiring monkeys, but the community is divided more
New article explores the emerging roles in environmental health  NEWS MEDICAL · 5 days
Hundreds of environmental health professionals across the nation report challenges and research needs in six areas -; drinking water quality, wastewater management, healthy homes, food safety, public health pests and... more
Springy bamboo poles help villagers carry more than their own body weight  PHYS.ORG · 5 days
Southeast Asia is a riot of colour and biodiversity. Boasting luxuriant rainforest and thousands of insects and mammals, the region is ripe for a... more
Like Pavlov's dog, this thermoplastic is learning a new trick: Walking  SCIENCE DAILY · 5 days
Researchers are 'training' pieces of plastic to walk under the command of light. The method developed is the first time a synthetic actuator 'learns' to do... more
Record-size sex chromosome found in two bird species  SCIENCE DAILY · 5 days
Researchers have discovered the largest known avian sex chromosome. The giant chromosome was created when four chromosomes fused together into one, and has been found in two species of lark. more
Are most dolphins 'right-handed,' too?  MNT · 5 days
After studying dolphins for 6 years, researchers have found that these mammals have a preference for their right sides, similar to human right-handedness. more
Solving Fossil Mystery Could Aid Mars Life Quest  ASTRO WATCH · 5 days
The search for evidence of life on Mars could be helped by fresh insights into ancient rocks on Earth. Research... more
France bans two US pesticides, citing risk to bees  PHYS.ORG · 5 days
French authorities on Wednesday banned two US pesticides which ecologists deem harmful to bees. more
Bye-bye, birdie: Study finds North American birds getting smaller  REUTERS · 6 days
Since 1978, researchers have scooped up and measured tens of thousands of birds that died after crashing into... more
Medical News Today: Are most dolphins 'right-handed,' too?  MNT · 6 days
After studying dolphins for 6 years, researchers have found that these mammals have a preference for their right sides, similar to human right-handedness. more
Medical News Today: Why scientists are studying hibernation to tackle obesity  MNT · 6 days
New research in hibernating mammals reveals that noncoding DNA may play a role in mechanisms related to obesity control in humans and other animals. more
North America's bird shrinkage documented, with a crash and a splat  REUTERS · 6 days
Since 1978, researchers have scooped up and measured tens of thousands of birds that... more
Living at the edges  PHYS.ORG · 6 days
Resembling an overgrown house cat with black-tipped ears and a stubby tail, the Canada lynx, a native of North America, teeters on the brink of extinction in the U.S. The few lynx that now roam parts of Washington and the... more
Mating avoidance in female olive baboons (Papio anubis) infected by Treponema pallidum  Science Magazine · 6 days
Sexually transmitted infections (STIs) are ubiquitous within wild animal populations, yet it remains largely unknown whether animals evolved behavioral avoidance mechanisms in response to... more
Single-cell connectomic analysis of adult mammalian lungs  Science Magazine · 6 days
Efforts to decipher chronic lung disease and to reconstitute functional lung tissue through regenerative medicine have been hampered by an incomplete understanding of cell-cell interactions governing tissue homeostasis. Because the structure of mammalian lungs... more
Untangling the branches in the mammal tree of life  PHYS.ORG · 6 days
The mammal tree of life is a real leaner. Some branches are weighed down with thousands of species—we're looking at you, rodents and bats—while others hold just a few species. more
Sexually transmitted diseases reduce the willingness of female baboons to mate  PHYS.ORG · 6 days
Sexually transmitted diseases are widespread among animals and humans. Humans, however, know a multitude of protective and hygienic measures to protect themselves from infection. An international... more
Once-a-month birth control pill? Experiment works in animals  ABC NEWS · 6 days
Birth control pills work great if women remember to take them every day but missing doses can mean a surprise pregnancy more
Deer and elk can help young Douglas-fir trees under some conditions  PHYS.ORG · 6 days
Long considered pests by forest managers, deer and elk can help Douglas-fir seedlings thrive under certain vegetation management conditions, a five-year study by Oregon State University... more
The wellbeing connection  PHYS.ORG · 6 days
Soya and beef from South America, timber from Russia, fish from China—in an era of globalisation, central Europe has become a market for animal and plant products from all over the world. But in addition to these tangible goods, faraway... more
National Park Service scientists: Does aircraft noise make birds more vocal?  PHYS.ORG · 6 days
National Park Service scientists analyzed nearly 1 million 10-second audio recording samples from national parks across the country and discovered a small increase in bird sound... more
Researchers decipher small Dead Sea mammal's vocal communication  PHYS.ORG · 6 days
In nature social living is strongly connected to the ability to communicate with others. Maintaining social ties and coordinating with group mates require frequent communication. Therefore, complex social systems are usually associated... more
New Pterosaur Species Unearthed in Lebanon: Mimodactylus libanensis  SCI-NEWS.COM · 6 days
Paleontologists in Lebanon have discovered the extremely well-preserved fossilized remains of a previously unknown Cretaceous-period flying reptile. Pterosaurs were highly... more
Migratory birds shrinking as climate warms, new analysis of four-decade record shows  SCIENCE DAILY · 6 days
North American migratory birds have been getting smaller over the past four decades, and their wings have gotten a bit longer. Both changes appear... more
Like Pavlov's dog, this thermoplastic is learning a new trick: walking  PHYS.ORG · 6 days
Researchers in Finland are "training" pieces of plastic to walk under the command of light. The method developed, published December 4 in the journal Matter, is... more
Through the eyes of animals  SCIENCE DAILY · 6 days
Humans are now closer to seeing through the eyes of animals, thanks to an innovative software framework. more
Record-size sex chromosome found in two bird species  PHYS.ORG · 6 days
Researchers in Sweden and the UK have discovered the largest known avian sex chromosome. The giant chromosome was created when four chromosomes fused together into one, and has been found in two... more
Tiny red handfish hatchlings a lifeline for world's rarest fish  PHYS.ORG · 6 days
Fifty newborn red handfish are giving IMAS scientists an opportunity to help save the last known populations of the world's rarest fish. more
Dogs found able to perceive slight changes in human spoken words  PHYS.ORG · 6 days
A team of researchers with the University of Sussex, the Defence Science and Technology Laboratory and the University of Lyon, has found that dogs are able... more
Study finds native bees turning to polystyrene for nesting places  PHYS.ORG · 6 days
New Curtin University research has found that polystyrene can serve as a nesting place for native bees, which are able to exploit the man-made material for their own... more
Road salt is taking its toll on insects in Toronto area, researchers find  PHYS.ORG · 6 days
It may help keep your car on the road in the winter, but research from the University of Toronto suggests that road... more
Expert discusses the harms of algal blooms  PHYS.ORG · 6 days
When dying birds and sea lions wash up by the dozens on Southern California beaches, David Caron's phone starts ringing. more
Migratory birds shrinking as climate warms, new analysis of four-decade record shows  PHYS.ORG · 6 days
North American migratory birds have been getting smaller over the past four decades, and their wings have gotten a bit longer. Both changes appear... more
Respiration key to oxygenation in the brain  NEWS MEDICAL · 6 days
Contrary to accepted knowledge, blood can bring more oxygen to mice brains when they exercise because the increased respiration packs more oxygen into the hemoglobin, according to an international team of researchers who believe... more
Fecal pellets and food remains reveal what ghost bats eat in the Pilbara  PHYS.ORG · 6 days
UWA, Curtin university and Perth zoo researchers have discovered that Australian endangered ghost bats in the Pilbara (WA) eat over 46 different... more
Global carbon emissions growth slows, but hits record high  PHYS.ORG · 6 days
The runaway train that is climate change is about to blow past another milestone: global fossil-fuel carbon dioxide emissions will reach yet another record high. Driven by rising natural gas... more
Researchers create artificial tactile perception in monkeys through direct brain stimulation  NEWS MEDICAL · 7 days
Researchers from Duke University and HSE University have succeeded in creating artificial tactile perception in monkeys through direct brain stimulation. more
"Indiana Jones" scientists collect seeds in wild for climate change fight  REUTERS · 7 days
Braving perils from blood-sucking leeches to tigers and using transport as basic as elephants,... more
Cats Have Facial Expressions and Some People Can Read Them, Scientists Say  SCI-NEWS.COM · 7 days
A new study, published in the journal Animal Welfare, shows that some people are particularly good at identifying feline emotions from cats’ faces; women... more
Smog-eating graphene composite reduces atmospheric pollution  PHYS.ORG · 7 days
Graphene Flagship partners the University of Bologna, Politecnico di Milano, CNR, NEST, Italcementi HeidelbergCement Group, the Israel Institute of Technology, Eindhoven University of Technology, and the University of Cambridge have developed a graphene-titania photocatalyst that degrades... more
Compound eyes: The visual apparatus of today's horseshoe crabs goes back 400 million years  SCIENCE DAILY · 7 days
The extinct sea scorpion species Jaekelopterus rhenaniae had eyes comparable to those of today's horseshoe crabs. The two-and-a-half-meter predator was... more
Compound eyes: The visual apparatus of today's horseshoe crabs goes back 400 million years  PHYS.ORG · 7 days
The eyes of the extinct sea scorpion Jaekelopterus rhenaniae have the same structure as the eyes of modern horseshoe crabs... more
Science around the planet uses images of Earth from the space station  PHYS.ORG · 7 days
Artificial lighting at night affects the behavior of urban wildlife, according to a recent study published in Nature Scientific Reports, which examined animals in... more
Social influencers: What can we learn from animals?  PHYS.ORG · 7 days
Research from Oxford University calls us to reconsider how behaviours may spread through societies of wild animals, and how this might provide new insights into human social networks. more
Bird evolution unique in seeing shrinking testes  PHYS.ORG · 7 days
Birds are the only group of vertebrate animals to have repeatedly evolved smaller testes over time according to a new study. more
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