Animals
Australia orders urgent review after spate of dingo attacks  PHYS.ORG · 6 hours
Australia on Sunday ordered a urgent review into the management of dingoes on a popular tourist island after a spate of attacks by the wild dogs this year. more
Costa Rica bets on ending fossil fuel use by 2050  PHYS.ORG · 1 day
Eric Orlich and his wife Gioconda Rojas own two electric vehicles, which they charge at home in the garage thanks to solar panels on their roof. more
Mysterious river dolphin helps crack the code of marine mammal communication  SCIENCE DAILY · 2 days
The Araguaian river dolphin of Brazil was thought to be solitary with little social structure that would require communication. But researchers have discovered the dolphins actually... more
Court: EPA has 90 days to justify use of dangerous pesticide  ABC NEWS · 2 days
A federal appeals court has given the Environmental Protection Agency 90 days to justify why a widely used but dangerous pesticide should stay on the market more
Weak honey bee colonies may fail from cold exposure during shipping  SCIENCE DAILY · 2 days
Cold temperatures inside honey bee colonies may cause colony losses during and after long-distance hauling, according to a preliminary study. more
Living room conservation: Gaming and virtual reality for insect and ecosystem conservation  SCIENCE DAILY · 2 days
Gaming and virtual reality could bridge the gap between urban societies and nature, thereby paving the way to insect conservation by the means of... more
Carnivorous Mammal Larger than Polar Bear Once Roamed Kenya  SCI-NEWS.COM · 2 days
A gigantic meat-eating mammal has been discovered — after its jaw, portions of its skull, and parts of... more
A scientist used chalk in a box to show that bats use sunsets to migrate  SCIENCE-NEWS · 2 days
A new device for investigating bat migration suggests that the flying mammals orient themselves by the setting sun. more
MicroRNA-like RNAs contribute to the lifestyle transition of Arthrobotrys oligospora  PHYS.ORG · 2 days
Lifestyle transition is a fundamental mechanism that fungi have evolved to survive and proliferate in different environments. As a typical nematode-trapping fungus, Arthrobotrys oligospora switches from saprophytes to... more
Mysterious river dolphin helps crack the code of marine mammal communication  PHYS.ORG · 2 days
The Araguaian river dolphin of Brazil is something of a mystery. It was thought to be quite solitary, with little social structure that would require communication.... more
Researchers discover good news for fish populations living on bleached coral reefs  NEWS MEDICAL · 2 days
Researchers have discovered some good news for fish populations living on coral reefs hit by climate change. more
Preliminary study suggests mercury not a risk in dog foods  PHYS.ORG · 3 days
Researchers at the University of California, Davis, recently investigated levels of methylmercury in a small sampling of commercial dog foods and found good news for dog owners. Of... more
Fish under threat release chemicals to warn others of danger  PHYS.ORG · 3 days
Fish warn each other about danger by releasing chemicals into the water as a signal, research by the University of Saskatchewan (USask) has found. more
Tech startups Pinterest, Zoom soar in Wall Street debut  PHYS.ORG · 3 days
Pinterest got off to a flying start on Wall Street Thursday in the market debut for the San Francisco-based visual discovery service, a positive sign for the wave of Silicon... more
IPO mania: Zoom zooms, Pinterest pins down Wall Street  PHYS.ORG · 3 days
There's some tech jubilance in the air on Wall Street and in Silicon Valley as a pair of newly public companies—Zoom and Pinterest—are seeing their stocks soar on their first... more
Preliminary study suggests mercury not a risk in dog foods  SCIENCE DAILY · 3 days
Researchers recently investigated levels of methylmercury in a small sampling of commercial dog foods and found good news for dog owners. Of the 24 diets tested, only three... more
Ocean currents bring good news for reef fish  SCIENCE DAILY · 3 days
A new study suggests reefs suffering coral bleaching can still be productive, as fish dependent on reefs get a bulk of their food delivered via the currents flowing past. more
These beetles have successfully freeloaded for 100 million years  SCIENCE DAILY · 3 days
An ancient and rare beetle fossil is the oldest example of a social relationship between two animal species. more
Fish under threat release chemicals to warn others of danger  SCIENCE DAILY · 3 days
Fish warn each other about danger by releasing chemicals into the water as a signal, research has found. more
Weak honey bee colonies may fail from cold exposure during shipping  PHYS.ORG · 3 days
Cold temperatures inside honey bee colonies may cause colony losses during and after long-distance hauling, according to a preliminary study by Agricultural Research Service (ARS) scientists. more
IPO mania: Zoom, Pinterest surge in market debuts  PHYS.ORG · 3 days
Investors are giving unicorn technology companies Zoom and Pinterest a rousing reception in their debuts on the stock market. more
How superstitions spread  PHYS.ORG · 3 days
Ancient Roman leaders once made decisions about important events, such as when to hold elections or where to build new cities, based on the presence or flight patterns of birds. Builders often omit the thirteenth floor from their floor plans,... more
Bee-wildering! Hives of Notre-Dame in miraculous survival  PHYS.ORG · 3 days
Some 200,000 bees inhabiting hives in Notre-Dame cathedral survived the inferno that engulfed the heritage landmark in a miraculous escape, their beekeeper said Thursday. more
Ocean currents bring good news for reef fish  PHYS.ORG · 3 days
Researchers have discovered some good news for fish populations living on coral reefs hit by climate change. more
Fossils found in museum drawer in Kenya belong to gigantic carnivore  SCIENCE DAILY · 3 days
Paleontologists have discovered a new species of meat-eating mammal larger than any big cat stalking the world today. Larger than a polar bear, with a skull... more
Living room conservation: Gaming and virtual reality for insect and ecosystem conservation  PHYS.ORG · 3 days
Gaming and virtual reality (VR) could bridge the gap between urban societies and nature, thereby paving the way to insect conservation by the means... more
New Dinosaur Species Uncovered in Mongolia  SCI-NEWS.COM · 3 days
Paleontologists in Mongolia have discovered a new species of hadrosauroid dinosaur that roamed what is now the Gobi Desert approximately 90 million years ago.... more
Turning an old enemy into a helpful friend  PHYS.ORG · 3 days
Half our genome is basically foreign, derived from viruses. Obviously, the invasion of such foreign elements can deregulate critical biological processes, and lead to disease. This is why animals, including humans have... more
The Cerrado once connected the Andes with the Atlantic Rainforest  PHYS.ORG · 3 days
The tropical forests of the Andes and Brazil's Atlantic Rainforest biome are separated by almost 1,000 km of drier areas with open vegetation in the Chaco, Cerrado (Brazilian... more
Wild bee species critical to pollination on the decline  PHYS.ORG · 3 days
More than a dozen wild bee species critical to pollinizing everything from blueberries to apples in New England are on the decline, according to a new study. more
Here's What Scotland's Dogs Looked Like 4,500 Years Ago  LIVE SCIENCE · 3 days
The re-created, three-dimensional face of a dog that lived 4,500 years ago in Scotland is so realistic, you almost want to reach out and pet its thick fur. more
Medical News Today: Some brain functions may be restored after death, pig study suggests  MNT · 3 days
Scientists have restored some brain function in a pig's brain 4 hours after the mammal has died. The findings open... more
Some brain functions may be restored after death, pig study suggests  MNT · 3 days
Scientists have restored some brain function in a pig's brain 4 hours after the mammal has died. The findings open new avenues for researching the brain. more
Ocean circulation likely to blame for severity of 2018 red tide  PHYS.ORG · 3 days
The harmful algae that causes red tide is currently at near undetectable levels in Florida waters compared with the much higher concentrations at this time last... more
Scientists unearth 220 million-year-old dinosaur fossils in Argentina  PHYS.ORG · 3 days
A site containing the 220-million-year-old fossilised remains of nearly a dozen dinosaurs has been discovered in western Argentina, researchers said Wednesday. more
Fossils found in museum drawer in Kenya belong to gigantic carnivore  PHYS.ORG · 3 days
Paleontologists at Ohio University have discovered a new species of meat-eating mammal larger than any big cat stalking the world today. Larger than a polar bear,... more
Glowing millipede genitalia help scientists tell species apart  PHYS.ORG · 3 days
Sometimes, it's really easy for scientists to tell species of animals apart—they'll be obviously different shapes or colors. Other times, different species will look nearly identical to the naked eye. In those... more
Switch from hunting to herding recorded in ancient urine  SCIENCE DAILY · 4 days
A new study begins to resolve the scale and pace of change during the first phases of animal domestication beyond the Fertile Crescent. To reconstruct this history, the authors turned... more
The Cerrado once connected the Andes with the Atlantic Rainforest  SCIENCE DAILY · 4 days
A genetic and computational analysis of birds suggests that the Andean and Atlantic tropical forests, which are now almost a thousand kilometers apart, were connected via the Cerrado... more
Why researchers are mapping the world's manure  PHYS.ORG · 4 days
Farmers rely on phosphorus fertilizers to enrich the soil and ensure bountiful harvests, but the world's recoverable reserves of phosphate rocks, from which such fertilizers are produced, are finite and unevenly distributed. Stevens Institute... more
These beetles have successfully freeloaded for 100 million years  PHYS.ORG · 4 days
Almost 100 million years ago, a tiny and misfortunate beetle died after wandering into a sticky glob of resin leaking from a tree in a region near present-day Southeast Asia.... more
Genetics behind the evolution of flightless birds  SCIENCE DAILY · 4 days
Based on the analysis of the genomes of more than a dozen flightless birds, including an extinct moa, researchers found that while different species show wide variety in the protein-coding portions of their genome,... more
Features that make lizards appealing to potential mates are resilient to stress  SCIENCE DAILY · 4 days
Physical traits and behaviors that make a lizard sexy -- features used to attract potential mates and fend off competitors -- may be important... more
Physical and geometric determinants of transport in fetoplacental microvascular networks  Science Magazine · 4 days
Across mammalian species, solute exchange takes place in complex microvascular networks. In the human placenta, the primary exchange units are terminal villi that contain disordered networks of fetal... more
Science News » NIH BRAIN Initiative Tool May Transform How Scientists Study Brain Structure and Function  NIMH · 4 days
Researchers have developed a high-tech support system that can keep a large mammalian brain from rapidly... more
Switch from hunting to herding recorded in ancient pee  PHYS.ORG · 4 days
The transition from hunting and gathering to farming and herding is considered a crucial turning point in the history of humanity. Scholars think the intensive food production that came along... more
Hours After Pigs' Death, Scientists Restore Brain Cell Activity  LIVE SCIENCE · 4 days
Scientists have restored brain circulation and some cell activity in pigs' brains hours after the animals died in a slaughterhouse. more
Dead pig brains bathed in artificial fluid showed signs of cellular life  SCIENCE-NEWS · 4 days
Four hours after pigs died, the animals’ brain cell activity was restored by a sophisticated artificial system. more
Fish that outlived dinosaurs reveals secrets of ancient skull evolution  PHYS.ORG · 4 days
A new study into one of the world's oldest types of fish, Coelacanth, provides fresh insights into the development of the skull and brain of vertebrates and the... more
Features that make lizards sexy are resilient to stress  PHYS.ORG · 4 days
Physical traits and behaviors that make a lizard sexy—features used to attract potential mates and fend off competitors—may be important enough that they do not change in the face of... more
Small fossils with big applications: BP Gulf of Mexico time scale  SCIENCE DAILY · 4 days
Geologic time scales are critical to understanding the timing, duration, and connection of geologic events. They are not static, and can be improved with research, integration,... more
Honey, I ate the kids: The sweet side of filial cannibalism  SCIENCE DAILY · 4 days
Why do some animals eat or abandon their offspring? According to researchers, these might actually be forms of parental care. Their mathematical model shows that when... more
How the social lives of animals should form part of our conservation culture  PHYS.ORG · 4 days
Shared knowledge is an important currency for humans. It shapes everything from what we eat and how we dress, to how we... more
Asian elephant outlives stegodon—advantage due to diverse diet  PHYS.ORG · 4 days
Together with their Chinese colleagues, Senckenberg scientists studied the feeding habits of the Asian elephant and its extinct relative, the stegodon, during the Pleistocene. They reached the conclusion that the Asian elephant... more
Rhinos, Gomphotheres, Camels, Horses, Antelopes and Alligators Lived in Ancient ‘Texas Serengeti’  SCI-NEWS.COM · 4 days
Dr. Steven May, a paleontology research associate at the University of Texas at Austin, has studied and identified an extensive collection of fossils from... more
Parenting chores cut into how much these bird dads fool around  SCIENCE-NEWS · 4 days
Frantic parenting demands after eggs hatch curtail male black coucals’ philandering excursions the most, a study finds. more
Study Examined Germ Levels In Men's Beards Versus Dogs  NPR · 4 days
Researchers wanted to know whether they could use the same MRI scanners for dogs and people. They swabbed the machines used by 18 bearded men and 30 dogs. The beards... more
Sea sick: Plastic garbage in the North Atlantic Ocean skyrocketing  PHYS.ORG · 4 days
Sure, we all know there's always more fish in the sea. But there's also plenty more plastic garbage. more
For its health and yours, keep the cat indoors  PHYS.ORG · 4 days
At least one running argument among cat lovers is now over: Whiskers, Lucy and Tigger are definitely better off staying indoors, scientists reported Wednesday. more
Low-cost, high-speed algorithm may allow animal-free chemical toxicity testing  NEWS MEDICAL · 4 days
The use of animals to test the toxicity of chemicals may one day become outdated thanks to a low-cost, high-speed algorithm developed by researchers at Rutgers and other universities. more
Cometary Surprise Found Inside Meteorite  ASTRO WATCH · 4 days
An ancient sliver of the building blocks from which comets formed was discovered encased inside a meteorite like an insect in amber by a Carnegie-led research... more
Catfish use complex coordination to suck in prey  PHYS.ORG · 5 days
Catfish do not have arms or tongues to help them catch and swallow their prey—instead, a catfish ready to strike moves its head. more
New algorithm allows for faster, animal-free chemical toxicity testing  SCIENCE DAILY · 5 days
The use of animals to test the toxicity of chemicals may one day become outdated thanks to a low-cost, high-speed algorithm. more
New algorithm allows for faster, animal-free chemical toxicity testing  PHYS.ORG · 5 days
The use of animals to test the toxicity of chemicals may one day become outdated thanks to a low-cost, high-speed algorithm developed by researchers at Rutgers and other universities. more
The high price endangered animals pay for charisma  PHYS.ORG · 5 days
"Wanted: beautiful, intelligent companion well-versed in the art of conversation." It's a familiar story, but don't expect a fairy-tale ending. In this instance, we're talking about a transaction that condemns one of... more
Can multiple carnivores coexist in cities?  PHYS.ORG · 5 days
As growth makes neighborhoods more crowded for humans, it's also concentrating carnivores like bobcats and coyotes into the remaining green spaces, leading them to interact with each other more frequently than they do in wild areas,... more
Study finds white sharks flee feeding areas when orcas present  PHYS.ORG · 5 days
New research from Monterey Bay Aquarium and partner institutions published today in Nature Scientific Reports challenges the notion that great white sharks are the most formidable predators in... more
White sharks flee feeding areas when orcas present  SCIENCE DAILY · 5 days
New research challenges the notion that great white sharks are the most formidable predators in the ocean. The research team documented encounters between white sharks and orcas at Southeast Farallon Island off... more
Can multiple carnivores coexist in cities?  SCIENCE DAILY · 5 days
A new citizen science study shows how urbanization may affect interactions between carnivores in small suburban forest patches, using camera trap images from Raleigh, N.C., and Washington, D.C. more
Aphid soldiers found to sacrifice themselves to protect their colony from predators  PHYS.ORG · 5 days
A team of researchers affiliated with several institutions in Japan has found that soldier aphids willingly sacrifice their own lives when they attempt to... more
Google searches reveal popular bird species  SCIENCE DAILY · 5 days
Cross-referencing a decade of Google searches and citizen science observations, researchers have determined which of 621 North American bird species are currently the most popular and which characteristics of species drive human interest. more
Up in arms: Insect-inspired arm technology aims to improve drones  SCIENCE DAILY · 5 days
Insect-inspired arm technology aims to improve drones to handle larger payloads. more
How jackdaws remember what they did where and when  PHYS.ORG · 5 days
Corvids are capable of cognitive feats that almost resemble those of humans. Neuroscientists at Ruhr-Universität Bochum (RUB) intend to find out how their brain manages to fulfill such complex tasks... more
Cute jumping spider named for children's author  PHYS.ORG · 5 days
A spider expert at the Manchester Museum has confirmed a new species of jumping spider discovered in a park in Hong Kong. The unique spider bears a striking resemblance to a caterpillar leading it... more
Employing 3-D coral reef remote sensing to predict fish biomass  PHYS.ORG · 5 days
Coral reefs offer many tropical fish a vibrantly encrusted locale of refuge – a respite from the intense pressures of the sea – providing an opportunity for protection,... more
China seizes nearly 2,750 elephant tusks in huge bust  PHYS.ORG · 5 days
Chinese authorities have seized 7.5 tonnes of ivory—2,748 elephant tusks—in one of the biggest busts in recent years as the country cracks down on the sale of illegal wildlife products. more
Papa roach: Chinese farmer breeds bugs for the table  PHYS.ORG · 5 days
As farmer Li Bingcai opened the door to his cockroach farm in southwest China, an insect the size of a dart flew into his face. more
Falling for telephone scams could be an early sign of dementia  NEWS MEDICAL · 5 days
The United States Department of Justice says that annually around $3 billion is defrauded from seniors. Many of these tricksters use the telephone for their scams.... more
Computer games for fish uncover why some prey lead and others follow  SCIENCE DAILY · 6 days
For the first time, researchers have shed new light on the evolution of different social roles within animal groups by exploring how fish predators... more
Google searches reveal popular bird species  PHYS.ORG · 6 days
Cross-referencing a decade of Google searches and citizen science observations, researchers have determined which of 621 North American bird species are currently the most popular and which characteristics of species drive human interest. Study findings have... more
Lead kills 1st Yellowstone golden eagle fitted with tracker  PHYS.ORG · 6 days
Officials say the first golden eagle in Yellowstone National Park to be fitted with a tracking device has died of lead poisoning. more
Gene-based factor VIIa prevents bleeding episodes in animals with hemophilia  PHYS.ORG · 6 days
Hematology researchers have further refined how a treatment currently used on an urgent basis to control bleeding in hemophilia patients holds promise as a preventive treatment as well.... more
Kenya's Maasai Mara: Facts About the Wildlife, Climate and Culture  LIVE SCIENCE · 6 days
Watching more than 2 million wildebeest and other migrating mammals travel hundreds of miles is one of the many spectacular natural events that occur in the Maasai Mara... more
New study sheds light on how extreme temperature hampers spermatogenesis in insects  NEWS MEDICAL · 6 days
The scientific community has long held an understanding about the effect of temperature on sperm production in mammals, but this new study sheds light... more
Gene-based factor VIIa prevents bleeding episodes in animals with hemophilia  SCIENCE DAILY · 6 days
Hematology researchers have further refined how a treatment currently used on an urgent basis to control bleeding in hemophilia patients holds promise as a preventive treatment as well.... more
Computer games for fish uncover why some prey lead and others follow  PHYS.ORG · 6 days
For the first time, researchers have shed new light on the evolution of different social roles within animal groups by exploring how fish predators... more
CatsDogsPrimates
New carbon dioxide capture technology is not the magic bullet against climate change
PHYS.ORG
These beetles have successfully freeloaded for 100 million years
PHYS.ORG
Dead pig brains bathed in artificial fluid showed signs of cellular life
SCIENCE-NEWS
How the social lives of animals should form part of our conservation culture
PHYS.ORG
Employing 3-D coral reef remote sensing to predict fish biomass
PHYS.ORG
Attention skills in a nonhuman cooperative breeding species
PHYS.ORG
Microscopic swimmers with visual perception of group members form stable swarms
PHYS.ORG
Video: The chemistry behind color-changing birds
PHYS.ORG
Cannibal worms recognize their children—and don’t eat them as a result
Science Magazine
Does your cat know its name? Here’s how to find out
Science Magazine
Keeping genetic engineering localized
PHYS.ORG
Here's why you need to keep your voice down when on a wildlife tour
PHYS.ORG
Zooming in on an inner-cell DNA repair shop
PHYS.ORG
Expert discusses alternatives to pesticides
PHYS.ORG
Watch this kangaroo rat kick a rattlesnake in the face
Science Magazine
Accelerating electrocatalyst discovery
PHYS.ORG
Research has implications for New Zealand bird conservation
PHYS.ORG
Doggy diagnosis can sniff out seizures: study
PHYS.ORG
Adhesive formed from bee spit and flower oil could form basis of new glues
PHYS.ORG
High-speed videos capture how kangaroo rat escapes rattlesnake attack
PHYS.ORG
Watch the nightmarish attack of a phantom midge larvae
Science Magazine
'Scuba-diving' lizard can stay underwater for 16 minutes
PHYS.ORG
Pets and owners—you can learn a lot about one by studying the other
PHYS.ORG
Here's what that house proud mouse was doing – plus five other animals who take cleaning seriously
PHYS.ORG
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