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fermi energizes the sky with gamma ray constellations Fermi Energizes the Sky With Gamma-ray Constellations
ASTRO WATCH Long ago, sky watchers linked the brightest stars into patterns reflecting animals, heroes, monsters and even scientific instruments into what is now... 2 hours
Is this bee solitary or social? The answer may depend on an autism-linked gene
Science Magazine Change in gene activity leads loners to keep their young around 1 hour
Novel switching valve to receive more semen in a sex-role reversed cave insect
SCIENCE DAILY The female of a sex-role reversed cave insect species Neotrogla has evolved a switching valve to receive more semen during mating, when... 13 hours
A curious branch of plankton evolution
SCIENCE DAILY Planktonic foraminifera -- tiny, shelled organisms that float in the sea -- left behind one of the most complete fossil records of evolutionary history in deep sea deposits. Consequently, evolutionists have a relatively sturdy grasp on... 13 hours
Not Just For Cows Anymore: New Cottonseed Is Safe For People To Eat
NPR Cottonseed is full of protein but toxic to humans and most animals. The USDA has approved a genetically engineered cotton with edible... 14 hours
Study uncovers new link between neonicotinoid pesticide exposure and bumblebee decline
PHYS.ORG Adding to growing evidence that pesticide use may be contributing to the decline of many bumblebee species across North America, a new study reveals that daily... 18 hours
Scientists Find New Biomarker Evidence for Neoproterozoic Animals
SCI-NEWS.COM A team of scientists led by University of California, Riverside’s Professor Gordon Love has found the oldest evidence yet of... 16 hours
NASA's Fermi mission energizes the sky with gamma-ray constellations
PHYS.ORG Long ago, sky watchers linked the brightest stars into patterns reflecting animals, heroes, monsters and even scientific instruments into what is now an official collection of 88 constellations. Now scientists... 17 hours
World’s biggest whooping crane breeding program winds down
Science Magazine Scientists airlift 33 birds in first wave of relocation 17 hours
Ancient Sea Monsters Swallowed a Lot of Salty Water. This Is How They Got Rid of It.
LIVE SCIENCE Ancient sea monsters inadvertently swallowed mouthfuls of seawater whenever they gulped down prey, but... 17 hours
Prevention of pesticide-induced neuronal dysfunction and mortality with nucleophilic poly-Oxime topical gel
Science Magazine Organophosphate-based pesticides inhibit acetylcholinesterase (AChE), which plays a pivotal role in neuromuscular function. While spraying in the field, farmworkers get exposed to pesticides through... 17 hours
Pupil's brain recognizes the perfect teacher
SCIENCE DAILY Human and avian youngsters learn behaviors by imitating adults. But learners are selective in who they copy, and scientists don't understand how they choose the right teacher. Young male zebra finches must learn to copy the... 16 hours
Medical News Today: How to use cromolyn sodium to treat allergies
MNT Cromolyn sodium is a widely available medication for preventing and treating nasal allergies, such as hay fever and pet or dust allergies. It comes as a... 16 hours
Evidence of dogs accompanying humans to Europe during Neolithic
PHYS.ORG A team of researchers from across Europe and Israel has found evidence of dogs traveling with people from the Near East to Europe during the Neolithic. In their paper published... 19 hours
These ancient mounds may not be the earliest fossils on Earth after all
SCIENCE-NEWS A new analysis suggests that tectonics, not microbes, formed cone-shaped structures in 3.7-billion-year-old rock. 18 hours
Geologists Question 'Evidence Of Ancient Life' in 3.7 Billion-Year-Old Rocks
NPR A new analysis of what were initially thought to be microbial fossils in Greenland suggests they might instead just be mineral structures created when ancient tectonic forces squeezed... 18 hours
Are two parents better than one? Yes, but only if you're a burying beetle
PHYS.ORG VIDEO Parenting behaviour varies greatly across the animal kingdom. In most mammals, only mothers look after the young, and in most... 21 hours
Getting to the root of long-term tree swallow declines
PHYS.ORG VIDEO Aerial insectivores—birds that hunt for insect prey on the wing—are declining across North America. Conserving vulnerable species such as these requires a good understanding of the factors impacting them at... 20 hours
Extinction is forever—and ecosystem recovery takes a really, really long time
PHYS.ORG Researchers from the University of Leeds studying fossil data surrounding the Permo-Triassic (P-Tr) extinction of 252 million years (Ma) ago found that a marine ecosystem, in... 21 hours
Fish undisturbed by flash photography
PHYS.ORG Fish experience stress, as do mammals and humans. When under stress, fish release the hormones adrenaline and cortisol. A team of scientists spearheaded by IGB has investigated whether flash photography induces an increase in cortisol levels of fish... 21 hours
Novel switching valve to receive more semen in a sex-role reversed cave insect
PHYS.ORG The female of a sex-role reversed cave insect species Neotrogla has evolved a switching valve to receive more semen during mating, when... 21 hours
Eighty tons of illegal bluefin tuna pose a threat to sustainable fisheries and human health
PHYS.ORG Spanish authorities announced the arrest of 76 people involved in a large illegal trade of bluefin tuna worth... 21 hours
World Food Day: Fish gone, people gone
PHYS.ORG On World Food Day, WWF warns against the dramatic impact of overfished oceans on people around the globe. Currently, 33 percent of fish stocks are overfished (in the Mediterranean it is 85 percent) with... 22 hours
A curious branch of plankton evolution
PHYS.ORG Planktonic foraminifera (forams) - tiny, shelled organisms that float in the sea—left behind one of the most complete fossil records of evolutionary history in deep sea deposits. Consequently, evolutionists have a relatively sturdy grasp on when... 20 hours
Researchers Sequence Genome of Wild Sugarcane
SCI-NEWS.COM An international team of over 100 scientists from 16 institutions has sequenced the genome of the wild sugarcane (Saccharum spontaneum). The results appear in... 19 hours
Larval fish database to show effects of climate change on fisheries
PHYS.ORG A new larval fish database collated over the last 30 years will be used to measure marine ecosystem state and change as well as seasonal patterns... 22 hours
Dual vaccine against anthrax and plague
SCIENCE DAILY A team of researchers has now engineered a virus nanoparticle vaccine against Bacillus anthracis and Yersinia pestis, tier 1 agents that pose serious threats to national security of the United States. B. anthracis and Y. pestis... 22 hours
58 Australian fairy penguins slaughtered in suspected dog attack
PHYS.ORG Wildlife officials in the southern Australia on Wednesday announced an investigation into the mass death of 58 penguins they believe were killed in a dog attack. 1 day
New Nanoparticle-Based Vaccine Protects against Anthrax and Plague
SCI-NEWS.COM A research team in the United States has developed a nanoparticle-based dual vaccine against Bacillus anthracis and Yersinia pestis —... 1 day
Photos: Peer at Glittering Insect Eyes and Glowing Spider Babies in Prizewinning Photos
LIVE SCIENCE See the spectacular closeup views of very tiny things, in the winning images of the 2018 Nikon Small World microphotography contest. 2 days
Letting nature take its course: Wolves in Yellowstone National Park
PHYS.ORG Since the reintroduction of wolves to Yellowstone National Park in 1995, the park's ecosystem has become a deeply complex and heterogeneous system, aided by a strategy of minimal... 2 days
Letting nature take its course: Wolves in Yellowstone National Park
SCIENCE DAILY Since the reintroduction of wolves to Yellowstone National Park in 1995, the park's ecosystem has become a deeply complex and heterogeneous system, aided by a strategy of minimal... 2 days
Diets rich in fish oil could slow the spread and growth of breast cancer cells
SCIENCE DAILY Omega-3 fatty acids, such as those typically contained in fish oil, may suppress the growth and spread of... 2 days
Researchers develop new method to address deep-seated biases in science, starting with birds
PHYS.ORG New UMBC research is helping dismantle gender and publication biases in science. A team of researchers working across disciplines has developed a... 2 days
Letting your dog sleep with you is good for chronic pain sufferers, new study shows
PHYS.ORG For chronic pain sufferers, it may be smart to let sleeping dogs lie, a new University of Alberta... 2 days
Big Agriculture eyeing genetic tool for pest control
PHYS.ORG A controversial and unproven gene-editing technology touted as a silver bullet against malaria-bearing mosquitos could wind up being deployed first in commercial agriculture, according to experts and an NGO report published Tuesday. 2 days
Australians care about animals but don't buy ethical meat
PHYS.ORG Australians clearly care about animal welfare: our research has found 92% shoppers in Sydney considered animal welfare to be important. 2 days
How insects can help fight hunger in the world
PHYS.ORG Insects could be a game changer in the race to combat food insecurity and achieve zero hunger – the theme of this year's World Food Day. 2 days
Fish oil based diets may suppress growth and spread of breast cancer cells
NEWS MEDICAL Omega-3 fatty acids, such as those typically contained in fish oil, may suppress the growth and spread of breast cancer cells in... 2 days
Extensive trade in fish between Egypt and Canaan 3,500 years ago
PHYS.ORG As early as 3,500 years ago, there was a brisk trade in fish on the shores of the southeastern Mediterranean Sea. This conclusion follows from the... 2 days
Do Canadian Carvings Depict Vikings? Removing Mammal Fat May Tell
LIVE SCIENCE Carvings uncovered in the Canadian Arctic may be the earliest portraits of the Vikings created in the Americas. 2 days
Scientists develop dual anthrax-plague vaccine
NEWS MEDICAL A team of researchers has now engineered a virus nanoparticle vaccine against Bacillus anthracis and Yersinia pestis, tier 1 agents that pose serious threats to national security of the United States. B. anthracis and Y. pestis are the... 2 days
New Fossils of Ground Sloth-Like Dinosaur Could Help Reveal Why Sauropods Got So Big
SCI-NEWS.COM Sauropods are a group of plant-eating dinosaurs which... 2 days
Study reveals best use of wildflowers to benefit crops on farms
PHYS.ORG With bee pollinators in decline and pesky crop pests lowering yields, sustainable and organic farmers need environmentally friendly solutions. 2 days
Higher temperatures could help protect coral reefs
PHYS.ORG A new study in the journal Behavioral Ecology, published by Oxford University Press, suggests that higher water temperature, which increases the aggressiveness of some fish, could lead to better protection of some coral. 2 days
Swishing tails guard against voracious insects with curtain of breeze
PHYS.ORG Bothersome insects are a predicable summer hazard. Swatting them can almost become a sport, but some irritable horses enjoy taking shots at something larger. 'I have been hit... 3 days
Two degrees decimated Puerto Rico's insect populations
PHYS.ORG While temperatures in the tropical forests of northeastern Puerto Rico have climbed two degrees Celsius since the mid-1970s, the biomass of arthropods—invertebrate animals such as insects, millipedes, and sowbugs—has declined by as much as... 3 days
Best use of wildflowers to benefit crops on farms
SCIENCE DAILY For the first time, a new study of strawberry crops on New York farms tested this theory and found that wildflower strips on farms added pollinators when the farm lay... 3 days
How beetle larvae thrive on carrion
PHYS.ORG The burying beetle Nicrophorus vespilloides buries the cadavers of small animals in soil to use them as a food source for its offspring. However, the carcass and thus the breeding site are highly susceptible to microbial... 3 days
Mammals cannot evolve fast enough to escape current extinction crisis
PHYS.ORG Humans are exterminating animal and plant species so quickly that nature's built-in defence mechanism, evolution, cannot keep up. An Aarhus-led research team calculated that if current conservation efforts... 3 days
Discovery of a simple mechanism for color detection
PHYS.ORG Color vision, consisting of ocular color detection, is achieved with complicated neural mechanisms in the eyes. Researchers from Osaka City University in Japan have found color detection with a simple mechanism in... 3 days
Several species of insects have almost completely vanished from some tropical forests
Science Magazine Climate change is likely to blame, experts say 3 days
How beetle larvae thrive on carrion
SCIENCE DAILY The burying beetle Nicrophorus vespilloides buries the cadavers of small animals to use them as a food source for its offspring. However, the carcass is susceptible to microbial decomposition. Researchers show that the beetles replace harmful... 3 days
Discovery of a simplest mechanism for color detection
SCIENCE DAILY Color vision, ocular color detection is achieved with complicated neural mechanisms in the eyes. Researchers have found color detection with a simplest mechanism in the fish pineal organ, an extraocular photosensitive organ... 3 days
Mammals cannot evolve fast enough to escape current extinction crisis
SCIENCE DAILY The sixth mass extinction is underway, this time caused by humans. A team of researchers have calculated that species are dying out so quickly that nature's built-in defense... 3 days
Potential benefits of wildlife-livestock coexistence in East Africa
SCIENCE DAILY A study of 3,588 square kilometers of privately owned land in central Kenya offers evidence that humans and their livestock can, in the right circumstances, share territory with zebras, giraffes, elephants and... 3 days
Scientists chase mystery of how dogs process words
SCIENCE DAILY Experimental results suggest that dogs have at least a rudimentary neural representation of meaning for words they have been taught, differentiating words they have heard before from those they have not. 3 days
PPR virus poses threat to conservation
PHYS.ORG A team of conservationists from the Royal Veterinary College, WCS, Food and Agricultural Organization of the United Nations, University of Veterinary Medicine, Vienna published a letter in this week's edition of the journal Science on the... 3 days
PPR virus poses threat to conservation
SCIENCE DAILY Researchers have reviewed the threat of the virus peste des petits ruminants (PPR) to conservation. 3 days
Americans spend $70 billion on pets, and that money could do more good
PHYS.ORG Sylar, the border collie, has his own mansion along with a trampoline and indoor pool. The dog's adorable features, along with his... 3 days
Oldest evidence for animals found
PHYS.ORG Researchers at the University of California, Riverside, have found the oldest clue yet of animal life, dating back at least 100 million years before the famous Cambrian explosion of animal fossils. 3 days
Sponges on ancient ocean floors 100 million years before Cambrian period
SCIENCE DAILY Researchers have found the oldest clue yet of animal life, dating back at least 100 million years before the famous Cambrian explosion of animal fossils. 3 days
Eating royal poop improves parenting in naked mole-rats
PHYS.ORG Have you ever seen a picture of a mother dog caring for an unusual baby, like a kitten? This sort of animal adoption story is an example of a phenomenon known as... 3 days
Extensive trade in fish between Egypt and Canaan 3,500 years ago
SCIENCE DAILY Some 3,500 years ago, a brisk trade in fish on the shores of the southeastern Mediterranean Sea had already begun. This conclusion follows from the analysis... 3 days
Study finds potential benefits of wildlife-livestock coexistence in East Africa
PHYS.ORG A study of 3,588 square kilometers of privately owned land in central Kenya offers evidence that humans and their livestock can, in the right circumstances, share territory with... 3 days
Aussie same-sex penguin 'couple' tickled pink by foster egg
PHYS.ORG Two male penguins who have paired up as a "same-sex couple" have become so good at nesting that zookeepers in Sydney have given them a real egg to look after. 3 days
Medicare Advantage riding high as new insurers flock to sell to seniors
NEWS MEDICAL Health care experts widely expected the Affordable Care Act to hobble Medicare Advantage, the government-funded private health plans that millions of seniors have chosen... 3 days
Tropical moths in the mountains are larger
PHYS.ORG Researchers from three universities have measured more than 19,000 tropical moths from 1,100 species to find out whether their size varies with elevation. Scientists from Friedrich-Schiller-University Jena (Germany) worked on the study together with... 3 days
The untapped power of fuel cells
PHYS.ORG In recent years, renewable energy has been on the rise in the United States. Still, the overwhelming majority of our energy comes from fossil fuels. And, renewable energy needs to overcome significant limitations and obstacles to... 3 days
China purrs over white tiger triplets
PHYS.ORG Three playful white Bengal tiger cubs are charming visitors as they clamber around their enclosure at a zoo in China. 3 days
New Angry Birds television series being hatched
PHYS.ORG Producers are laying plans for a new "Angry Birds" television series based on the cult video game, its distributors said Saturday. 5 days
Shrimp talent quest finds a winner
SCIENCE DAILY Shrimp help keep fish clean -- and scientists have identified the 'cleaner shrimp' with the most talent for reducing parasites and chemical use in farmed fish. 6 days
Did mosasaurs hunt like killer whales?
SCIENCE DAILY Researchers have examined the youngest-ever specimen of tylosaur ever found. Like orcas, mosasaurs might have used their bony noses to strike prey. 6 days
Classifying microbes differently leads to discovery
SCIENCE DAILY Changing the way microbes are classified can reveal similarities among mammals' gut microbiomes, according to a new study that proposes an alternative method for classifying microbes to provide insight into human and environmental health. 6 days
Smallest ever Tylosaurus fossil sheds light on species
SCIENCE DAILY The smallest Tylosaurus mosasaur fossil ever found has been revealed in a new study, and surprisingly it lacks a trademark feature of the species. 6 days
Studies demonstrate effect of Ketogenic Diet on cognitive health in animals
NEWS MEDICAL We've all experienced a "gut feeling" -- when we know deep down inside that something is true. That phenomenon and others (like "butterflies in the stomach")... 6 days
Quantifying evolutionary impacts of humans on the biosphere is harder than it seems
SCIENCE DAILY Are human disturbances to the environment driving evolutionary changes in animals and plants? A new study finds that, on average, human disturbances... 6 days
Do lizards dream like us?
SCIENCE DAILY Researchers have confirmed that lizards exhibit two sleep states, just like humans, other mammals, and birds. They corroborated the conclusions of a 2016 study on the bearded dragon and conducted the same sleep investigation on another lizard, the... 6 days
Image: South Sudan
PHYS.ORG The Copernicus Sentinel-2B satellite takes us over South Sudan. Having gained independence from Sudan in July 2011, South Sudan is the youngest country in the world. It has an estimated population of 13 million people, more than 80% of whom... 6 days
Mouse pups with same-sex parents born in China using stem cells and gene editing
SCIENCE DAILY Researchers were able to produce healthy mice with two mothers that went on to have normal offspring of their own.... 6 days
Quantifying evolutionary impacts of humans on the biosphere is harder than it seems
PHYS.ORG Are human disturbances to the environment driving evolutionary changes in animals and plants? A new study conducted by McGill researchers finds that,... 6 days
Scientists shine light on protein linked to fat storage
PHYS.ORG In new research that may have implications for strategies fighting obesity and diabetes, UNSW scientists have uncovered the structure of a protein believed to regulate the formation of fat in... 6 days
Two major studies on canine cancers may provide clues on human cancers
NEWS MEDICAL Two studies into deadly cancers in dogs are now underway, offered through the newly formed Clinical Trials Office at Cummings Veterinary Medical Center at... 6 days
Smallest ever Tylosaurus fossil sheds light on species
PHYS.ORG The smallest Tylosaurus mosasaur fossil ever found has been revealed in a new study in the Journal of Vertebrate Paleontology and surprisingly it lacks a trademark feature of the species. 6 days
Puppy-Size Roaches (and Other Bizarre Creatures) Pop Up in 'Beyond the Sixth Extinction'
LIVE SCIENCE In a toxic landscape of the future, what strange animals might evolve? 7 days
Do lizards dream like humans?
PHYS.ORG Researchers from the Sleep Team at the Lyon Neuroscience Research Center (CNRS/INSERM/Claude Bernard Lyon 1 University/Université Jean Monnet), together with a colleague from the MECADEV research laboratory (CNRS/Muséum National d'Histoire Naturelle) have confirmed that lizards exhibit two sleep... 7 days
Homology, neocortex, and the evolution of developmental mechanisms
Science Magazine The six-layered neocortex of the mammalian pallium has no clear homolog in birds or non-avian reptiles. Recent research indicates that although these extant amniotes possess a variety of divergent and nonhomologous pallial... 7 days
Video: What makes tardigrades such great survivors
PHYS.ORG VIDEO Tardigrades are tiny animals that can live in water droplets just about anywhere. When those water droplets dry out, tardigrades undergo an astonishing transformation to survive the lack of water. 7 days
Optical illusion spooks raptors
PHYS.ORG Researchers from the CNRS and Université de Rennes 1, in collaboration with Airbus, have designed a visual pattern that elicits long-term avoidance of high-risk areas by raptors. The work clears the way for further investigation into the visual cognition of... 7 days
France’s decade-old effort to slash pesticide use failed. Will a new attempt succeed?
Science Magazine Advocates hope lessons learned will sow seeds of future success 7 days
New clinical trials seek treatments for canine cancers, may offer clues on human cancers
PHYS.ORG Two studies into deadly cancers in dogs are now underway, offered through the newly formed Clinical Trials Office at Cummings... 7 days
Clues from a Somalian cavefish about modern mammals' dark past
PHYS.ORG After millions of years living in constant darkness, a species of blind cavefish found only in Somalia has lost an ancient system of DNA repair. That DNA repair... 7 days
Clues from a Somalian cavefish about modern mammals' dark past
SCIENCE DAILY After millions of years living in darkness, a species of blind cavefish has lost an ancient system of DNA repair. That DNA repair system, found in organisms including... 7 days
Shrimp talent quest finds a winner
PHYS.ORG Shrimp help keep fish clean—and scientists have identified the 'cleaner shrimp' with the most talent for reducing parasites and chemical use in farmed fish. 7 days
Mouse pups with same-sex parents born in China using stem cells and gene editing
PHYS.ORG Researchers at the Chinese Academy of Sciences were able to produce healthy mice with two mothers that went on to... 7 days
New microscope offers 4-D look at embryonic development in living mice
PHYS.ORG A smart new microscope has given scientists a front-row seat to the drama of mammalian development. 7 days
See these dazzling images of a growing mouse embryo
SCIENCE-NEWS VIDEO A new microscope creates intimate home movies of mice embryos taking shape, and could shed light on the mysterious process of mammalian development. 7 days
Beautiful photos put focus on Australian insects
PHYS.ORG Dramatic photos by Flinders natural sciences researcher James Dorey put a spotlight on an estimated 2000-3000 species of bees in Australia. 7 days
Genetic study provides new information about endangered whales
PHYS.ORG Hope for an alarmingly low number of gray whales in the western Pacific Ocean might rest with their cousins to the east, according to a Purdue University study of the animals' genetic... 7 days
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Are two parents better than one? Yes, but only if you're a burying beetle
PHYS.ORG
Getting to the root of long-term tree swallow declines
PHYS.ORG
See these dazzling images of a growing mouse embryo
SCIENCE-NEWS
Video: What makes tardigrades such great survivors
PHYS.ORG
INTO ORBIT℠ with 2018 FIRST® LEGO® League competition
ESA
Shifting desires for forbidden goods
PHYS.ORG
Does it really matter if one animal goes extinct?
PHYS.ORG
First direct observation of hunting pelican eel reveals a bizarre fish with an inflatable head
Science Magazine