Animals
Dog food delivered to western Alaska amid virus concerns  ABC NEWS · 1 day
Two animal welfare groups combined to have 8,000 pounds of dog food delivered to southwest Alaska more
Symmetry breaking in hydrodynamic forces drives meiotic spindle rotation in mammalian oocytes  Science Magazine · 1 day
Patterned cell divisions require a precisely oriented spindle that segregates chromosomes and determines the cytokinetic plane. In this study, we investigated how the meiotic... more
Genome elimination mediated by gene expression from a selfish chromosome  Science Magazine · 1 day
Numerous plants and animals harbor selfish B chromosomes that "drive" or transmit themselves at super-Mendelian frequencies, despite long-term fitness costs to the organism. Currently, it is unknown how... more
New temperature sensing mechanism in plants  SCIENCE DAILY · 1 day
Cell biologists reveal the phytochrome B molecule has unexpected dynamics activated by temperature, and behaves differently depending on the temperature and type of light. As climate change warms the world, crop growth patterns and flowering times... more
Homo erectus Existed 200,000 Years Earlier than Previously Thought  SCI-NEWS.COM · 1 day
An international team of paleoanthropologists has unearthed a 2-million-year-old skull of Homo erectus, the first of our ancestors... more
BioTek launches new Cell Count & Viability Starter Kit  NEWS MEDICAL · 2 days
BioTek Instruments today introduced a new kit that can help researchers quickly obtain high-quality cell count results by automating the often tedious and error-prone process of mammalian cell counting. more
First SARS-CoV-2 genomes in Austria openly available  PHYS.ORG · 2 days
The COVID-19 outbreak caused by the coronavirus SARS-CoV-2 was declared a pandemic by the World Health Organization (WHO) on 12 March 2020. It is thought to have been transmitted from wild animals to humans... more
Do urban fish exhibit impaired sleep?  PHYS.ORG · 2 days
Melatonin controls the body clock—high melatonin levels make us feel tired in the evening. However, the hormone also plays an important role in animals' biological rhythms. Artificial light at night—light pollution—can suppress the production of melatonin... more
Endangered wild dogs snapped in South Sudan  PHYS.ORG · 2 days
We promised you further fascinating footage from one of Africa's most neglected wildlife hotspots, and here it is. One of the continent's rarest and most elusive carnivores has been captured on camera in South... more
Do urban fish exhibit impaired sleep?  SCIENCE DAILY · 2 days
Melatonin controls the body clock -- high melatonin levels make us feel tired in the evening. However, the hormone also plays an important role in animals' biological rhythms. Artificial light at night -- light pollution --... more
Scientists develop 'backpack' computers to track wild animals in hard-to-reach habitats  SCIENCE DAILY · 2 days
To truly understand an animal species is to observe its behavior and social networks in the wild. With new technology, researchers are able to track tiny... more
Tooth be told: Earless seals existed in ancient Australia  PHYS.ORG · 2 days
A fossilised seal tooth found on a Victorian beach could hold the key to uncovering the history and geography of earless seals that graced Australia's shores three million years ago. more
When three species of human ancestor walked the Earth  SCIENCE DAILY · 2 days
Scientists share details of the most ancient fossil of Homo erectus known and discuss how these new findings are forcing us to rewrite a part of our species' evolutionary history. more
Lucy had an ape-like brain  SCIENCE DAILY · 2 days
A new study led by paleoanthropologists reveals that Lucy's species Australopithecus afarensis had an ape-like brain. However, the protracted brain growth suggests that -- as is the case in humans -- infants may have had a long dependence... more
90-Million-Year-Old Fossilized Rainforest Discovered in Antarctica  SCI-NEWS.COM · 2 days
An international team of paleontologists and geologists has uncovered well-preserved fossilized roots, pollen and spores of 90-million-year-old (mid-Cretaceous period) rainforest trees in West Antarctica.... more
41 million-year-old insect sex romp preserved in amber  LIVE SCIENCE · 2 days
Amber from Australia holds some of the continent's oldest known specimens of preserved plants and animals, and includes a pair of flies trapped while mating. more
Can cats and dogs catch or spread COVID-19?  NEWS MEDICAL · 2 days
A recent report from Hong Kong that two dogs had tested positive for the novel coronavirus SARS-CoV-2 had pet owners in a tizzy. This was compounded by news that a cat owned... more
Scientists develop 'backpack' computers to track wild animals in hard-to-reach habitats  PHYS.ORG · 2 days
To truly understand an animal species is to observe its behavior and social networks in the wild. With new technology described today (April 2) in PLOS... more
Contemporaneity of Australopithecus, Paranthropus, and early Homo erectus in South Africa  Science Magazine · 2 days
Understanding the extinction of Australopithecus and origins of Paranthropus and Homo in South Africa has been hampered by the perceived complex geological context of hominin fossils,... more
Whooping cranes form larger flocks as wetlands are lost—and it may put them at risk  PHYS.ORG · 3 days
Over the past few decades, the critically endangered whooping crane (Grus Americana) has experienced considerable recovery. However, in... more
Six million-year-old bird skeleton points to arid past of Tibetan plateau  PHYS.ORG · 3 days
Researchers from the Institute of Vertebrate Paleontology and Paleoanthropology (IVPP) of the Chinese Academy of Sciences have found a new species of sandgrouse in six to... more
Australopithecus afarensis Had Ape-Like Brain Organization, But Prolonged Brain Growth Like Humans  SCI-NEWS.COM · 3 days
Human brains are three times larger, are organized differently, and mature for a longer period of time than those of our closest living relatives,... more
Fossil trove sheds light on ancient antipodean ecology  PHYS.ORG · 3 days
The oldest known animals and plants preserved in amber from Southern Gondwana are reported in Scientific Reports this week. Gondwana, the supercontinent made up of South America, Africa, Madagascar, India, Antarctica and... more
Regulatory pathway modulates infection-related morphogenesis and pathogenicity in insecticidal fungus  PHYS.ORG · 3 days
Prof. WAMG Sibao from Center for Excellence in Molecular Plant Sciences of the Chinese Academy of Sciences (CAS), and Prof. Wei Gang from CAS-MPG Partner Institute for Computational... more
Baby steps: Ancient skull helps trace path to modern childhood  PHYS.ORG · 3 days
Within our extended primate family consisting of lemurs, monkeys, and apes, humans have the largest brains. Our closest living relatives, chimpanzees, weigh about two-thirds as much as us,... more
As ships move north with climate change, their noise scares Arctic cod away  PHYS.ORG · 3 days
When people who haven't been to the Arctic think of this remote and cold region, they may picture animals, such as polar... more
Routine and learning games: How to make sure your dog doesn't get canine cabin fever  PHYS.ORG · 3 days
As coronavirus forces us to isolate, some news outlets are suggesting now is the ideal time to bring... more
Calusa People Stored Live Fish in Watercourts  SCI-NEWS.COM · 3 days
In the 16th century, the Calusa, a fisher-gatherer-hunter society, were the most politically complex polity in Florida, and Mound Key, an island... more
Fossil skull casts doubt over modern human ancestry  PHYS.ORG · 3 days
Griffith University scientists have led an international team to date the skull of an early human found in Africa, potentially upending human evolution knowledge with their discovery. more
Rodents and a rocket carried these researchers' dreams to space  PHYS.ORG · 3 days
The human body evolved within the constant force of Earth's gravity. To prevent bone and muscle atrophy during their stays in space, astronauts must exercise every day. For... more
Study finds fish have diverse, distinct gut microbiomes  PHYS.ORG · 3 days
The rich biodiversity of coral reefs even extends to microbial communities within fish, according to new research. The study in Proceedings of the Royal Society: Biological Sciences reports that several important grazing... more
A next-generation sensor network for tracking small animals  PHYS.ORG · 3 days
A newly developed wireless biologging network (WBN) enables high-resolution tracking of small animals, according to a study published April 2 in the open-access journal PLOS Biology by Simon Ripperger of the Leibniz... more
The Latest: Shenzhen bans breeding and eating wild animals  ABC NEWS · 3 days
China's southern technology powerhouse of Shenzhen has issued the most sweeping ban yet on the breeding and consumption of wild animals  in an effort to prevent a future outbreak such... more
Study shows six decades of change in plankton communities  PHYS.ORG · 3 days
The UK's plankton population—microscopic algae and animals which support the entire marine food web—has undergone sweeping changes in the past six decades, according to new research published in Global Change... more
Rootin’, poopin’ African elephants help keep soil fertile  Science Magazine · 3 days
By toppling trees and spreading dung, elephants can enrich soil depleted by cattle more
Climate change may be making migration harder by shortening nightingales' wings  SCIENCE DAILY · 3 days
The Common Nightingale, known for its beautiful song, breeds in Europe and parts of Asia and migrates to sub-Saharan Africa every winter. A new study suggests... more
American robins now migrate 12 days earlier than in 1994  PHYS.ORG · 3 days
Every spring, American robins migrate north from all over the U.S. and Mexico, flying up to 250 miles a day to reach their breeding grounds in Canada and... more
'Starry Night' replica found on peacock spider's butt  LIVE SCIENCE · 3 days
Seven new species of peacock spider have been discovered in Australia, one of which was named for Vincent Van Gogh's Starry Night more
The COVID-19 pandemic has introduced us to a new word: Zoonosis (Op-Ed)  LIVE SCIENCE · 3 days
The recent eruption of COVID-19 near a "wet market" in Wuhan, China, calls our attention to a phenomenon captured by a word increasingly becoming... more
Skull scans reveal evolutionary secrets of fossil brains  PHYS.ORG · 3 days
Scientists have long been able to measure and analyze the fossil skulls of our ancient ancestors to estimate brain volume and growth. The question of how these ancient brains compare to modern... more
Australopithecus afarensis endocasts suggest ape-like brain organization and prolonged brain growth  Science Magazine · 3 days
Human brains are three times larger, are organized differently, and mature for a longer period of time than those of our closest living relatives, the chimpanzees.... more
Elephant welfare can be assessed using two indicators  SCIENCE DAILY · 3 days
In two new studies, scientists have investigated how to measure stress in semi-captive working elephants. The studies suggest that both physiological and behavioral approaches can be used to reliably assess the well-being... more
About the distribution of biodiversity on our planet  SCIENCE DAILY · 3 days
Large open-water fish predators such as tunas or sharks hunt for prey more intensively in the temperate zone than near the equator. With this result, a study is challenging a long-standing explanation... more
Surprising hearing talents in cormorants  SCIENCE DAILY · 3 days
The great cormorant has more sensitive hearing under water than in air. This new knowledge may help protect vulnerable bird species. more
Fish have diverse, distinct gut microbiomes  SCIENCE DAILY · 3 days
The rich biodiversity of coral reefs even extends to microbial communities within fish, according to new research. The study reports that several important grazing fish on Caribbean coral reefs each harbor a distinct microbial community within... more
Oldest ever human genetic evidence clarifies dispute over our ancestors  SCIENCE DAILY · 3 days
Genetic information from an 800,000-year-old human fossil has been retrieved for the first time. The results shed light on one of the branching points in the human family... more
Tiny fly from Los Angeles has a taste for crushed invasive snails  PHYS.ORG · 4 days
As part of their project BioSCAN - devoted to the exploration of the unknown insect diversity in and around the city of Los Angeles—the... more
Surprising hearing talents in cormorants  PHYS.ORG · 4 days
Many aquatic animals like frogs and turtles spend a big part of their lives under water and have adapted to this condition in various ways, one being that they have excellent hearing under water. more
Elephant welfare can be assessed using two indicators  PHYS.ORG · 4 days
Across the world, animals are kept in captivity for various reasons: in zoos for education and research, in research facilities for testing, on farms for meat and other products, and in people's... more
Landmark skull fossil provides surprising human evolution clues  REUTERS · 4 days
Scientists have solved a longstanding mystery over the age of a landmark skull found in 1921 in Zambia - the... more
Oldest-ever human genetic evidence clarifies dispute over our ancestors  PHYS.ORG · 4 days
Genetic information from an 800,000-year-old human fossil has been retrieved for the first time. The results from the University of Copenhagen shed light on one of the branching points in... more
Urban dogs are more fearful than their cousins from the country  PHYS.ORG · 4 days
Fearfulness is one of the most common behavioural disorders in dogs. As an emotion, fear is a normal and vital reaction that helps individuals survive in... more
Cooperative male dolphins match the tempo of each other's calls  SCIENCE DAILY · 4 days
When it comes to working together, male dolphins coordinate their behavior just like us. New findings provide insight into the importance of physical and vocal coordination in alliance... more
Insight into how insects sense and process pain and other negative stimuli  PHYS.ORG · 4 days
Scientists know that most organisms react to things that cause them pain, but they know more about some species than others. Take the fruit... more
Study shows large ocean predators are more active in temperate regions  PHYS.ORG · 4 days
An international team of researchers has found that large ocean predators such as tuna, marlin and sharks are more active in temperate regions. In their paper... more
Researchers develop new PCR system for detection of SARS-CoV-2 virus  NEWS MEDICAL · 4 days
Michael Traugott and the spin-off company Sinsoma GmbH, together with the Departments of Zoology and Microbiology at the University of Innsbruck, are developing a new PCR system for... more
Climate change may be making migration harder by shortening nightingales' wings  PHYS.ORG · 4 days
The Common Nightingale, known for its beautiful song, breeds in Europe and parts of Asia and migrates to sub-Saharan Africa every winter. A new study published... more
An affordable and fast clinical test that can save human lives and spares at-risk population  PHYS.ORG · 4 days
Horseshoe crabs are remarkable animals, beautiful in their weirdness. These "living fossils" evolved 450 million years ago and... more
New method helps preserve testicular cells, could save endangered feline species  NEWS MEDICAL · 4 days
A research team at the German Leibniz Institute for Zoo and Wildlife Research (Leibniz-IZW) developed a method to isolate and cryopreserve testicular cells. more
GABA is a key regulator to metamorphosis, shows study  NEWS MEDICAL · 4 days
Metamorphosis, or a dramatic change in physical appearance, is a normal part of the life cycle of many animals, carried out to take advantage of different ecological niches. more
Total-body PET provides suitable images of antibodies up to 30 days after injection  NEWS MEDICAL · 4 days
Combining 89Zr-labeled antibodies with total-body positron emission tomography (PET) has extended the utility of novel total-body PET scanners, providing suitable images up... more
COVID-19: Ban on eating wild meat deprives some forest communities  NEWS MEDICAL · 4 days
As efforts to curb the COVID-19 pandemic accelerate around the world, wildlife conservationists have welcomed a move by the Chinese government to outlaw the hunting and consumption of... more
Amyloid plaque formation causes brain tissue loss in animals  NEWS MEDICAL · 4 days
Amyloid plaque formation directly causes brain tissue loss in animals, but a drug called lithium reduces the life-shortening effects of this loss, shows a study published today in eLife. more
Cooperative male dolphins match the tempo of each other's calls  PHYS.ORG · 4 days
When it comes to working together, male dolphins coordinate their behaviour just like us. New findings, published in the Proceedings of the Royal Society B by an international... more
Should pets be tested for coronavirus?  Science Magazine · 4 days
The testing kits are ready, but there are roadblocks to using them more
Newly-Synthesized Peptide Could Disarm SARS-CoV-2 Coronavirus  SCI-NEWS.COM · 5 days
Chemists at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) have chemically synthesized a new peptide (a short protein fragment) that can bind to part of... more
Preservation of testicular cells to save endangered feline species  PHYS.ORG · 5 days
A research team at the German Leibniz Institute for Zoo and Wildlife Research (Leibniz-IZW) developed a method to isolate and cryopreserve testicular cells. This will allow the safekeeping and biobanking... more
Scientists Decode Genome of Sterlet Sturgeon  SCI-NEWS.COM · 5 days
An international team of researchers from the United States and Europe has produced the first high-quality genomic sequence for the sterlet (Acipenser ruthenus), a... more
Ocean data portal maps show significant shifts by mid-Atlantic fish species  PHYS.ORG · 5 days
A series of interactive maps published on the Mid-Atlantic Ocean Data Portal illustrates the shifts that have taken place over the last five decades by several... more
Needing a change? Researchers find GABA is the key to metamorphosis  PHYS.ORG · 5 days
Metamorphosis, or a dramatic change in physical appearance, is a normal part of the life cycle of many animals, carried out to take advantage of different... more
When warblers warn of cowbirds, blackbirds get the message  PHYS.ORG · 5 days
This is the story of three bird species and how they interact. The brown-headed cowbird plays the role of outlaw: It lays its eggs in other birds' nests and lets... more
New Trump mileage standards to gut Obama climate effort  PHYS.ORG · 5 days
President Donald Trump is poised to roll back ambitious Obama-era vehicle mileage standards and raise the ceiling on damaging fossil fuel emissions for years to come, gutting one of the... more
Sophisticatedly engineered 'watercourts' stored live fish, fueling Florida's Calusa kingdom  PHYS.ORG · 5 days
The mighty Calusa ruled South Florida for centuries, wielding military power, trading and collecting tribute along routes that sprawled hundreds of miles, creating shell islands, erecting enormous buildings... more
Untangling the social lives of spiders  PHYS.ORG · 5 days
The idea of a complex spider society—in which thousands of spiders live, hunt, and raise their young together in a single colony—is unsettling to many of us. We are perhaps lucky then that this scene is... more
New model offers ways to minimize risk of coronavirus during air travel  NEWS MEDICAL · 5 days
Fair or not, airplanes have a reputation for germs. However, there are ways to minimize the risks. Historic research based on group movements of... more
Temple researchers reverse muscle fibrosis associated with overuse injury in animals  NEWS MEDICAL · 5 days
Overuse injuries - think muscle strains, tennis elbow, and rotator cuff tears - are a considerable problem in the United States, especially among young athletes. more
Higher serum EPA levels from prescription fish oil associated with lower cardiovascular events  NEWS MEDICAL · 5 days
Higher levels of the omega-3 fatty acid eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) found in the blood—and not a decrease in triglyceride levels as originally... more
How social media makes it difficult to identify real news  SCIENCE DAILY · 5 days
There's a price to pay when you get your news and political information from the same place you find funny memes and cat pictures, new research suggests. The... more
Ecosystem services are not constrained by borders  PHYS.ORG · 6 days
What do chocolate, migratory birds, flood control and pandas have in common? Many countries benefit from ecosystem services provided outside their nations. This can happen through economic relationships, biological and geographical conditions, but we... more
How animals understand numbers influences their chance of survival  SCIENCE DAILY · 6 days
While they can't pick out precise numbers, animals can comprehend that more is, well, more. A neurobiologist explored the current literature on how different animal species comprehend numbers and the... more
Sturgeon genome sequenced  PHYS.ORG · 6 days
Sometimes referred to as the "the Methuselah of freshwater fish," sturgeons and their close relatives are very old from an evolutionary point of view. Fossils indicate that sturgeons date back 250 million years and have changed very little during this... more
Team develops new wastewater treatment process  PHYS.ORG · 6 days
Globally, there is a growing concern regarding the presence of trace emerging contaminants such as retinoids and oestrogenic endocrine disrupting chemicals (EDCs) in aquatic environments. Retinoids such as retinoic acids and their metabolites, which are the... more
Studying the mechanism for avian magnetic orientation  PHYS.ORG · 6 days
Ornithologists and physicists from St Petersburg University have conducted an interdisciplinary study together with colleagues from Sechenov Institute of Evolutionary Physiology and Biochemistry of the Russian Academy of Sciences and the Biological Station Rybachy... more
How social media makes it difficult to identify real news  PHYS.ORG · 6 days
There's a price to pay when you get your news and political information from the same place you find funny memes and cat pictures, new research suggests. more
How animals understand numbers influences their chance of survival  PHYS.ORG · 6 days
While they can't pick out precise numbers, animals can comprehend that more is, well, more. From birds to bees and wolves to frogs, animals use numbers to hunt, find a... more
Scientists propose new strategy for carbon dioxide electrochemical reduction  PHYS.ORG · 6 days
Carbon dioxide (CO2) emission has become a global problem. Efficient conversion of CO2 into value-added liquid fuels is one method to fix CO2, and it can alleviate the growing shortage... more
Are animals vulnerable to COVID-19?  PHYS.ORG · 6 days
While there's no evidence so far that pets, livestock, or their owners can infect each other with COVID-19, there is also very little research about a potential crossover. more
Runny honey, furry spinach and shiny apples: Surprising facts about your food  PHYS.ORG · 6 days
Spending a lot more time in your house doesn't have to make you any less curious about the world around you. Just look inside... more
Novel and fully automated technique can speed up detection of stroke  NEWS MEDICAL · 6 days
Human emotion system laboratory team at the University of Turku and Turku PET Centre, Finland, introduces a fully automated method for acute ischemic lesion segmentation on... more
Predation risk drives the evolution of the placenta  PHYS.ORG · 6 days
An international team of scientists led by assistant professor Bart Pollux from Wageningen University & Research has showed that predators are driving the evolution of more complex placentas. They studied populations of... more
Pablo Escobar's 'cocaine hippos' may be helping river ecosystems in Colombia  LIVE SCIENCE · 6 days
Hippos that once resided in Pablo Escobar's private zoo are now thriving and multiplying in the wild, performing an ecological role that has been vacant for... more
Where lions roam: West African big cats show no preference between national parks, hunting zones  PHYS.ORG · 6 days
West African lions are a critically endangered subpopulation, with an estimated 400 remaining and strong evidence of ongoing... more
Nature takes back world's empty city streets  PHYS.ORG · 6 days
As humans retreat into their homes as more and more countries go under coronavirus lockdown, wild animals are slipping cover to explore the empty streets of some of our biggest cities. more
Cat infected with COVID-19 from owner in Belgium  LIVE SCIENCE · 7 days
A domestic cat in Belgium was confirmed to have COVID-19, the disease caused by the new coronavirus that's spreading across the globe. more
The Latest: Dog-walking ban to fight virus causes outrage  ABC NEWS · 7 days
Pet owners in Serbia are furious over the populist government’s decision to ban even a brief walk for people with dogs during an evening curfew to contain the spread of... more
Whales face more fatal ship collisions as waters warm  PHYS.ORG · 7 days
Climate change is imperiling the world's largest animals by increasing the likelihood of fatal collisions between whales and big ships that ply the same waters. more
Heart size of dogs affects both vortex flow and pressure difference  NEWS MEDICAL · 1 week
An international collaboration led by veterinary scientists at Tokyo University of Agriculture and Technology, Japan, has found that size of a dog heart affects both vortex... more
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