Science news 24/7
A wave of monocytes is recruited to replenish the long-term Langerhans cell network after immune injury  Science Magazine · 21 minutes
A dense population of embryo-derived Langerhans cells (eLCs) is maintained within the sealed epidermis without contribution... more
AsiaSat shareholders accept privatization offer  SPACE NEWS · 2 hours
Shareholders of Hong Kong satellite operator AsiaSat voted overwhelmingly in favor of privatization, setting the company on a course to delist from the Hong Kong stock... more
Physicists Determine Maximum Possible Mass for Lightest Neutrino  SCI-NEWS.COM · 2 hours
Using data from the large scale structure of galaxies, the Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB), Type Ia supernovae, and Big Bang... more
Illinois patient's death may be first in US tied to vaping  ABC NEWS · 2 hours
Illinois health officials are reporting what could be United States' first death tied to vaping more
For Democrats, a shift toward the middle on health care  ABC NEWS · 2 hours
Democratic voters shift to the middle on health care as 'Medicare for All' loses some of its support more
Breath! Respiring microbes generate more energy  PHYS.ORG · 2 hours
How do cells generate and use energy? This question might seem simple, but the answer is far from simple. Furthermore, knowing how microbial cell factories consume energy and how proteins are allocated to do so is... more
Bioprinting complex living tissue in just a few seconds  PHYS.ORG · 1 hour
Tissue engineers create artificial organs and tissues that can be used to develop and test new drugs, repair damaged tissue and even replace entire organs in the human body. However,... more
Scientists use a new method to track pollution from cooking  PHYS.ORG · 2 hours
Cooking organic aerosol (COA) is one of the most important primary sources of pollution in urban environments. There is growing evidence that exposure to cooking oil fumes is... more
The West is trading water for cash. The water is running out  PHYS.ORG · 1 hour
When it comes to global warming's one-two punch of inundation and drought, the presence of too much water has had the most impact on... more
This rat is foiling developers' plans to capitalize on a weaker Endangered Species Act  PHYS.ORG · 1 hour
Southern California developers have long sought relief from regulations protecting wildlife, and earlier this month the Trump administration obliged, formally... more
Laser-produced uranium plasma evolves into more complex species  PHYS.ORG · 2 hours
When energy is added to uranium under pressure, it creates a shock wave, and even a tiny sample will be vaporized like a small explosion. By using smaller, controlled explosions, physicists can... more
Keeping monkeys as pets is extraordinarily cruel–a ban is long overdue  PHYS.ORG · 2 hours
Most people will have seen at least one headline over the last couple of years describing animal attacks on humans. This needn't include the elephant from... more
This is ESA  ESA · 4 hours
How much do you know about ESA? There's always more to discover... more
Scurrying roaches help researchers steady staggering robots  SCIENCE DAILY · 3 hours
To walk or run with finesse, roaches and robots coordinate leg movements via signals sent through centralized systems. Though their moving parts are utterly divergent, researchers have devised handy principles and equations to assess... more
Why cursive handwriting needs to make a schoolcomeback  PHYS.ORG · 5 hours
Teaching connected-style handwriting, otherwise known as cursive handwriting, has fallen out of fashion on many school curricula. Older generations have sometimes been shocked that some younger people today can't sign their names... more
Larval Bees are Omnivores, Shows New Study  SCI-NEWS.COM · 4 hours
Pollen-borne microbes represent an important protein source for larval bees, according to new research. Of the more than 20,000 species of bees... more
Malaria control success in Africa at risk from spread of multi-drug resistance  SCIENCE DAILY · 4 hours
In the first continent-wide genomic study of malaria parasites in Africa, scientists have uncovered the genetic features of Plasmodium falciparum parasites that inhabit different... more
In a quantum future, which starship destroys the other?  SCIENCE DAILY · 4 hours
Quantum mechanics boasts all sorts of strange features, one being quantum superposition -- the peculiar circumstance in which particles seem to be in two or more places or states at... more
The case for retreat in the battle against climate change  SCIENCE DAILY · 4 hours
With sea level rise and extreme weather threatening coastal communities, it's no longer a question of whether they are going to retreat; it's where, when and how. In... more
Plants are going extinct up to 350 times faster than the historical norm  PHYS.ORG · 5 hours
Earth is seeing an unprecedented loss of species, which some ecologists are calling a sixth mass extinction. In May, a United Nations... more
250,000 Melbourne residents losing water due to logging  PHYS.ORG · 5 hours
Logging in Melbourne's largest water catchment has led to a loss of water equivalent to the amount used by 250,000 people each year, new research from The Australian National University (ANU) shows. more
Save time using maths: Analytical tool designs corkscrew-shaped nano-antennae  PHYS.ORG · 3 hours
The nanostructures from Katja Höflich's HZB team are shaped like corkscrews and made of silver. Mathematically, such a nano antenna can be regarded as an one-dimensional line that forms a... more
Researcher works to understand how gonorrhea develops resistance to antibiotics  PHYS.ORG · 3 hours
Steadily and relentlessly, the bacterium that causes gonorrhea has slipped past medicine's defenses, acquiring resistance to once-reliable drugs, including penicillin, tetracycline, and ciprofloxacin. These former stalwarts are no... more
Experiments illuminate key component of plants' immune systems  SCIENCE DAILY · 4 hours
Biologists have shed new light on a crucial aspect of the plant immune response. Their discovery, revealing how plant resistance proteins trigger localized cell death, could lead to new strategies for engineering... more
Helping NASA spacecraft travel faster and farther with math  SCIENCE DAILY · 4 hours
By combining cutting-edge machine learning with 19th-century mathematics, a mathematician is working to make NASA spacecraft lighter and more damage tolerant by developing methods to detect imperfections in carbon nanomaterials... more
Your heart's best friend: Dog ownership associated with better cardiovascular health  SCIENCE DAILY · 4 hours
Owning a pet may help maintain a healthy heart, especially if that pet is a dog, according to a new analysis. The study examines the association... more
Biomaterials smarten up with CRISPR  SCIENCE DAILY · 4 hours
The CRISPR-Cas system has become the go-to tool for researchers who study genes in an ever-growing list of organisms, and is being used to develop new gene therapies that potentially can correct a defect at a single nucleotide... more
How red-eared invaders are hurting California's native turtles  SCIENCE DAILY · 4 hours
Western pond turtles got fatter and healthier after scientists removed nearly 200 invasive red-eared slider turtles from the UC Davis Arboretum, reports a new study. The study is the first to quantify... more
Do single people suffer more?  SCIENCE DAILY · 5 hours
Researchers have confirmed the analgesic effects of social support - even without verbal or physical contact. more
Researchers observe spontaneous occurrence of skyrmions in atomically thin cobalt films  PHYS.ORG · 5 hours
Since their experimental discovery, magnetic skyrmions—tiny magnetic knots—have moved into the focus of research. Scientists from Hamburg and Kiel have now been able to show that... more
Image: Amazonian fires continue shrouding South America in smoke  PHYS.ORG · 5 hours
NOAA/NASA's Suomi NPP satellite collected this natural-color image using the VIIRS (Visible Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite) instrument on August 21, 2019. Smoke from the fires raging in in the Amazon... more
The Amazon is on fire: Here are 5 things you need to know  PHYS.ORG · 5 hours
Record fires are raging in Brazil's Amazon rainforest, with more than 2,500 fires currently burning. They are collectively emitting huge amounts of... more
Birds balance sexiness and predator avoidance by changing color  PHYS.ORG · 5 hours
Most birds remain the same color year-round, replacing their feathers only once a year. more
How to make influence from people in our networks a force for good  PHYS.ORG · 5 hours
As the social and economic divides between groups grow ever wider, and social mobility declines, the bonds that tie people together, within... more
Frying oil consumption worsened colon cancer and colitis in mice, study shows  SCIENCE DAILY · 3 hours
Food scientists have shown that feeding frying oil to mice exaggerated colonic inflammation, enhanced tumor growth and worsened gut leakage, spreading bacteria or toxic... more
SCIENCE VIDEO
Scurrying roaches help researchers steady staggering robots
SCIENCE DAILY
Bioprinting complex living tissue in just a few seconds
SCIENCE DAILY
This is ESA
ESA
Why cursive handwriting needs to make a schoolcomeback
PHYS.ORG
To ban or not to ban genetically modified crops? That's not the question
PHYS.ORG
Q&A: Scientist models exoplanet's atmosphere
PHYS.ORG
After using tools, crows behave more optimistically, study suggests
PHYS.ORG
Dialysis industry spends big to protect profits
NEWS MEDICAL
New study reveals mechanism of ultraviolet-induced skin breakdown
NEWS MEDICAL
Where are new stars born? NASA's Webb Telescope will investigate
PHYS.ORG
Complete Orion starts tests for shipping to Plum Brook
ESA
How to become a great impostor
PHYS.ORG
Ethiopia's future is tied to water— a vital yet threatened resource in a changing climate
PHYS.ORG
Video: Five things you might not want to mix with birth control
PHYS.ORG
Modal time theory: Understanding human existence through time travel and music
PHYS.ORG
Modal time theory: Understanding human existence through time travel and music
PHYS.ORG
Research explains why many psychiatric drugs that work in the lab don’t work in people
NEWS MEDICAL
FRESH SCIENCE