SCIENCE DAILY Peering for the first time into the workings of tiny chemical catalysts, scientists observed that the 'defective' structure on their edges enhances their reactivity and effectiveness. This finding that could lead to the design of improved catalysts that make industrial chemical processes greener, by decreasing the amount of energy needed for chemical reactions, and preventing the formation of unwanted and potentially hazardous products. 5 months
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How gold can recycle biofuel waste into useful additive
PHYS.ORG Gold nanoparticles serve as catalysts for obtaining valuable chemical products based on glycerol. Scientists from Tomsk Polytechnic University and their international colleagues are developing gold catalysts to recycle one of... 4 days
Neutrons provide the first nanoscale look at a living cell membrane
PHYS.ORG VIDEO A research team from the Department of Energy's Oak Ridge National Laboratory has performed the first-ever direct nanoscale examination of a living cell membrane. In doing... 3 days
Researchers break down plastic waste
PHYS.ORG What to do proteins and Kevlar have in common? Both feature long chain molecules that are strung together by amide bonds. These strong chemical bonds are also common to many other naturally occurring molecules as well as man-made... 20 hours
CRKL in 22q11.2; a key gene that contributes to common birth defects
SCIENCE DAILY The research findings imply that patients with genitourinary birth defects due to 22q11.2 changes in gene dosage should also be evaluated for other potential... 12 hours
Jupiter's Rings from the Inside! First-Ever View Captured by Juno
SPACE.COM During its initial data-collecting dive over Jupiter's poles on Aug. 27, 2016, Juno captured the first-ever photo of the giant planet's faint ring system from the inside, mission... 20 hours
Scientists identify key gene in 22q11.2 that contributes to genitourinary birth defects
NEWS MEDICAL The 22q11.2 region of human chromosome 22 is a hotspot for a variety of birth defects. Scientists learned about this region because it is... 2 days
researchers help provide first glimpse of organelles in action inside living cells Researchers help provide first glimpse of organelles in action inside living cells
PHYS.ORG VIDEO Researchers at Howard Hughes Medical Institute and the Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute for Child Health and Human Development are getting a first glimpse... 2 days
Scientists make vanadium into a useful catalyst for hydrogenation
PHYS.ORG Just as Cinderella turned from a poor teenager into a magnificent princess with the aid of a little magic, scientists at the U.S. Department of Energy's Argonne National Laboratory have... 21 hours
Why Bad Moods Are Good For You
LIVE SCIENCE Bad moods and sadness are a normal, and even a useful and adaptive part of being human, helping us cope with many everyday situations and challenges. 4 days
Toward mass-producible quantum computers
PHYS.ORG Quantum computers are experimental devices that offer large speedups on some computational problems. One promising approach to building them involves harnessing nanometer-scale atomic defects in diamond materials. 22 hours
Study takes step toward mass-producible quantum computers
PHYS.ORG Quantum computers are experimental devices that offer large speedups on some computational problems. One promising approach to building them involves harnessing nanometer-scale atomic defects in diamond materials. 23 hours
Nonlocally sensing the magnetic states of nanoscale antiferromagnets with an atomic spin sensor
Science Magazine The ability to sense the magnetic state of individual magnetic nano-objects is a key capability for powerful applications ranging from readout of... 14 hours
A fresh look inside the protein nano-machines
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Water is surprisingly ordered on the nanoscale
SCIENCE DAILY The surface of minuscule water drops with a 100 nm size is surprisingly ordered, new research shows. At room temperature, the surface water molecules of these droplets have much stronger interactions than a normal... 2 days
Researchers find first compelling evidence of new property known as 'ferroelasticity' in perovskites
PHYS.ORG Crystalline materials known as perovskites could become the next superstars of solar cells. Over the past few years, researchers have demonstrated that... 4 days
Special X-ray technique allows scientists to see 3-D deformations
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A fresh look inside the protein nano-machines
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Submillihertz magnetic spectroscopy performed with a nanoscale quantum sensor
Science Magazine Precise timekeeping is critical to metrology, forming the basis by which standards of time, length, and fundamental constants are determined. Stable clocks are particularly valuable in spectroscopy because they define... 1 day
Total abdominal wall transplantation provides new option for transplant recipients with severe defects
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How whales got so big, sperm in space, and a first look at Jupiter’s poles
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Humanitarian efforts could be aided by AI
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U.S. spacecraft finds cyclones, ammonia river on Jupiter
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French designer shows off DIY robot in public for first time
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New, water-based, recyclable membrane filters all types of nanoparticles
PHYS.ORG Separation technology is at the heart of water purification, sewage treatment and reclaiming materials, as well as numerous basic industrial processes. Membranes are used to separate out the smallest nanoscale... 5 days
Juno spacecraft reveals a more complex Jupiter
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Water is surprisingly ordered on the nanoscale
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New Sunscreen Recommendations for 2017: Here's What to Look For
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Research shows aggressive treatment of sepsis can save lives
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South Sudan wildlife surviving civil war, but poaching and trafficking threats increase
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Graphene on silicon carbide can store energy
PHYS.ORG By introducing defects into the perfect surface of graphene on silicon carbide, researchers at Linköping University in Sweden have increased the capacity of the material to store electrical charge. This result, which has been... 4 days
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Pregnant rays and babies pay a price after 'catch and release' from fishing trawlers
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The mystery of quantum computers
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'As soon as I could walk, I started to collect rocks'
STUDENT SCIENCE
Has Everest's famous Hillary Step really collapsed? Here's the science
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Designing games that change perceptions, opinions and even players' real-life actions
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Tornado spawning Eastern US storms examined by GPM satellite
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Researchers help provide first glimpse of organelles in action inside living cells
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Look at Eva, 4 months old and standing
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The language of 'terror' serves political ends – we owe it to our children to find real answers
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Collapsing star gives birth to a black hole
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Tiny shells indicate big changes to global carbon cycle
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Jupiter’s skies are peppered with electron streams, ammonia plumes, and massive storms
Science Magazine
Neutrons provide the first nanoscale look at a living cell membrane
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