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Video
Birds have time-honored traditions, too
SCIENCE DAILY By faithfully copying the most popular songs, swamp sparrows create time-honored song traditions that can be just as long-lasting as human traditions, finds a new study. The results show that creating traditions that pass the test of time... 32 minutes
When you're a sitting duck, you learn to adapt
PHYS.ORG When sitting on a nest to incubate eggs, a bird is physically stuck and most vulnerable to attacks of any kind, so coping without stress and other significant costs is... 4 hours
Dogs understand what's written all over your face
PHYS.ORG Dogs are capable of understanding the emotions behind an expression on a human face. For example, if a dog turns its head to the left, it could be picking up that someone... 2 hours
In praise of the midges pestering footballers in the World Cup
PHYS.ORG England's opening match in World Cup 2018 was a dramatic clash between Gareth Southgate's Young Lions and several million gnats, not to mention Tunisia's wrestling footballers.... 2 hours
Having a meal activates the functioning of human brown fat
SCIENCE DAILY The importance of the human brown adipose tissue (BAT) has become clearer during the past ten years. Using positron emission tomography, PET, it was shown that adult humans... 2 hours
Hearing tests on wild whales
PHYS.ORG Scientists published the first hearing tests on a wild population of healthy marine mammals. The tests on beluga whales in Bristol Bay, AK, revealed that the whales have sensitive hearing abilities and the number of animals that experienced... 3 hours
Dry landscapes can increase disease transmission
PHYS.ORG In water-limited landscapes sick animals can have increased contact with healthy individuals, which can facilitate disease transmission. Scientists from the German Leibniz Institute for Zoo and Wildlife Research (Leibniz-IZW) present these findings in the British Ecological... 2 hours
Climate change to overtake land use as major threat to global biodiversity
SCIENCE DAILY Climate change will have a rapidly increasing effect on the structure of global ecological communities over the next few decades, with amphibians and reptiles... 3 hours
Beluga whales have sensitive hearing, little age-related loss
SCIENCE DAILY Scientists published the first hearing tests on a wild population of healthy marine mammals. The tests on beluga whales in Bristol Bay, AK, revealed that the whales have sensitive hearing abilities and... 2 hours
Mystery 'Dogman' Beast Shot in Montana Was Just a Gray Wolf, DNA Shows
LIVE SCIENCE When the beast was found, its features led to some pretty wild speculation about whether it was a dire wolf, a dog-wolf... 3 hours
South Asian monsoon efficiently purifies the air of pollutants, but also distributes them across the globe
PHYS.ORG The same phenomenon recurs every year. During the dry season, in winter, burning fossil fuels and... 2 hours
Why homosexual behaviour in insects may be a case of mistaken identity
PHYS.ORG Sex is costly for insects. It uses up resources such as water, energy and time. Some species, like bush crickets, can ejaculate as much... 2 hours
Strange sponge-like fossil creature from half a billion years ago
SCIENCE DAILY A discovery of a new species of sponge-like fossil from the Cambrian Period sheds light on early animal evolution. 3 hours
Do bats adapt to gates at abandoned mines?
SCIENCE DAILY Abandoned mines can serve as roost sites for bats, but because the mines pose serious risks to humans, officials often install gates at their entrances. 3 hours
People feeling threatened by vegetarianism care less about animals
PHYS.ORG New research suggests that if people perceive the rise of vegetarianism as a threat to their way of life they are more likely to care less for some animals. 3 hours
Chip upgrade helps bee-size drones navigate
SCIENCE DAILY The same researchers, who last year designed a tiny computer chip tailored to help honeybee-sized drones navigate, have now shrunk their chip design even further, in both size and power consumption. 3 hours
Light pollution a reason for insect decline
PHYS.ORG Climate change, pesticides and land use changes alone cannot fully explain the decline in insect populations in Germany. Scientists from the Leibniz-Institute of Freshwater Ecology and Inland Fisheries (IGB) have now discovered that regions... 6 hours
Fossil fish with platypus-like snout shows that coral reefs have long been evolution hotspots
PHYS.ORG Coral reefs are well known today for their incredibly diverse and abundant marine life, including fish species ranging from delicate butterflyfish to... 6 hours
Ancient, Mustached Sea Creature Used Spiny Limbs to Disembody Prey
LIVE SCIENCE It took more than 100 years, but researchers have finally come up with a scientific description for a weird, thumb-size sea creature with large eyes, a "mustache" and... 6 hours
Photos: Ancient Shrimp-Like Critter Was Tiny But Fierce
LIVE SCIENCE About 508 million years ago, a fierce water beastie with paddles and a shrimp-like tail sped through the water, hunting for prey. 6 hours
Electron sandwich doubles thermoelectric performance
PHYS.ORG Researchers more than doubled the ability of a material to convert heat into electricity, which could help reduce the amount of wasted heat, and thus wasted fossil fuel, in daily activities and industries. 6 hours
Oxygen consumption in human BAT increases after a meal, shows research
NEWS MEDICAL The importance of the human brown adipose tissue has become clearer during the past ten years. Using functional imaging, positron emission tomography, PET, it was possible... 8 hours
Birds have time-honored traditions, too
PHYS.ORG What makes human cultural traditions unique? One common answer is that we are better copycats than other species, which allows us to pass our habits and ways of life down through the generations without losing or forgetting them. 8 hours
Innovative autonomous system for identifying schools of fish
PHYS.ORG The University of Haifa (Israel) and two teams from the IMDEA Networks Institute have developed an innovative autonomous system, SYMBIOSIS, to monitor real-time schools of fish. This system, which combines optical and... 10 hours
Do bats adapt to gates at abandoned mines?
PHYS.ORG Abandoned mines can serve as roost sites for bats, but because the mines pose serious risks to humans, officials often install gates at their entrances. With more than 80,000 abandoned mines in... 13 hours
Climate change to overtake land use as major threat to global biodiversity
PHYS.ORG Climate change will have a rapidly increasing effect on the structure of global ecological communities over the next few decades, with amphibians and reptiles... 18 hours
Strange 'nude' fossil creature from half a billion years ago
PHYS.ORG Scientists have discovered the fossil of an unusual large-bodied 'nude' sea-creature from half a billion years ago. 18 hours
Idaho family sues US after child sprayed by cyanide trap
ABC NEWS An Idaho couple who says their son was sprayed with cyanide by a predator-killing trap that federal workers mistakenly placed on U.S. land near their home has sued... 18 hours
There Are More 'Pet' Tigers Than There Are in the Wild. How Did That Happen?
LIVE SCIENCE How did we get into this situation? 18 hours
Lion conservation research can be bolstered by input from a wide-range of professionals
SCIENCE DAILY To tackle the sharp decline in lion numbers, conservation research should consider wild prey, livestock and the environment, not just human-lion interaction,... 18 hours
Insight into infant handling by young bonobos
SCIENCE DAILY Drawn to a behavior she didn't understand, a researcher watching bonobos in a zoo has revealed how young female bonobos prepare for motherhood. 20 hours
Light pollution a reason for insect decline
SCIENCE DAILY Climate change, pesticides and land use changes alone cannot fully explain the decline in insect populations in Germany. Scientists have now discovered that regions that have experienced a sharp decline in flying insects also... 22 hours
Bees love blue fluorescent light, and not just any wavelength will do
SCIENCE DAILY Researchers have learned that a specific wavelength range of blue fluorescent light set bees abuzz. 23 hours
Four new mountain lions kittens found in California mountains
PHYS.ORG Four new mountain lion kittens have been found by researchers studying the wild cats living in Southern California's Santa Monica Mountains, wildlife officials announced in video posts Tuesday showing the... 24 hours
Bees love blue fluorescent light, and not just any wavelength will do
PHYS.ORG Researchers at Oregon State University have learned that a specific wavelength range of blue fluorescent light set bees abuzz. 1 day
Lion conservation research can be bolstered by input from a wide-range of professionals
PHYS.ORG The conservation of lions, while maintaining the well-being of people that live around them, is a complex problem that should be addressed... 1 day
Madagascar’s predators are probably vulnerable to toxic toads
SCIENCE-NEWS The Asian common toad, an invasive species in Madagascar, produces a toxin in its skin that’s probably toxic to most of the island’s predators. 1 day
Study of bonobos finds that day care pays off for the babysitters
PHYS.ORG Drawn to a behavior she didn't understand, a UO researcher watching bonobos in a zoo has revealed how young female bonobos prepare for motherhood. 1 day
Tiny jumping roundworm undergoes unusual sexual development
PHYS.ORG Nematodes may be among the simplest animals, but scientists can't get enough of the microscopic roundworms. They have mapped the entire genome ofC. elegans, the "lab rat" of nematodes, and have characterized nearly every... 1 day
Researchers discover pesticide-free way to limit mosquitoes and reduce spread of West Nile virus
NEWS MEDICAL Researchers at the University of Waterloo may have discovered a new, pesticide-free way to limit mosquito populations in some area... 1 day
Sister species of birds reveal clues to how biodiversity evolves
PHYS.ORG Extensive new datasets about the world's birds are helping to solve the riddle of how life on Earth diversified. 1 day
Love inspires new species name
PHYS.ORG Love is in the air at The University of Queensland with entomologist Dr Errol Hassan naming a new species of wasp after his wife to celebrate more than 50 years of marriage. 1 day
World's oldest Sumatran orangutan dies aged 62
PHYS.ORG The world's oldest Sumatran orangutan, which had 11 children and 54 descendants spread across the globe, has died aged 62, Australian zoo officials said Tuesday. 1 day
Factor important for ZIKA Virus host species restriction
SCIENCE DAILY In 2013 and 2015, devastating outbreaks of ZIKA captured world attention. The virus is often transmitted from wild animals -- probably non-human primates -- via mosquitos to humans. This is the first... 2 days
Are smarter animals bigger troublemakers?
SCIENCE DAILY A new paper examines whether smarter animals might be better at learning to live in cities -- but, at the same time, also may come into more conflict with humans. 2 days
Two new creatures discovered from dawn of animal life
SCIENCE DAILY Earth's first complex animals were an eclectic bunch that lived in the shallow oceans between 580-540 million years ago. 2 days
The Oldest DNA from Giant Pandas Was Just Discovered in a Cave in China
LIVE SCIENCE Scientists analyzed mitochondrial DNA to prove that a fossil belonged to an unknown, ancient cousin of modern pandas. 2 days
Local interventions boost coral's resilience to bleaching
PHYS.ORG Local conservation actions, like rounding up predatory snails, can significantly boost the resilience of corals to climate-induced bleaching, according to a study led by Duke University researchers. 2 days
Two new creatures discovered from dawn of animal life
PHYS.ORG Earth's first complex animals were an eclectic bunch that lived in the shallow oceans between 580-540 million years ago. 2 days
The Oldest DNA from Giant Pandas Was Just Discovered in a China Cave
LIVE SCIENCE Scientists analyzed mitochondrial DNA to prove that a fossil belong to an unknown, ancient cousin of modern pandas. 2 days
Are smarter animals are bigger troublemakers?
SCIENCE DAILY A new paper examines whether smarter animals might be better at learning to live in cities -- but, at the same time, also may come into more conflict with humans. 2 days
Pancreatic cell size linked to mammalian lifespan, finds zoo animal analysis
PHYS.ORG More than two thousand years ago, Greek philosopher Aristotle observed that larger animals tend to live longer than smaller ones. On June 18 in the journal... 2 days
Researchers explore whether smarter animals are bigger troublemakers
PHYS.ORG You have probably encountered a raccoon raiding the trash in your neighborhood, seen a rat scurrying through the subway or tried to shoo away birds from your picnic. But have you ever... 2 days
Researchers discover new defense mechanism against oxygen radicals
NEWS MEDICAL Oxygen radicals occur as a by-product when living beings burn carbohydrates or fat. They are suspected of accelerating the ageing process in humans and animals, and to be partly responsible for severe... 2 days
Pesticide-free way to combat mosquitoes and West Nile
SCIENCE DAILY Researchers may have discovered a new, pesticide-free way to limit mosquito populations in some area and reduce the spread of the West Nile virus. 2 days
'Uber for lawn care' launches in Kansas City, connects homeowners and landscapers
PHYS.ORG Need a ride at the drop of a hat or a late-night bite? Uber's got you. Wag! can walk your dog. 2 days
In the gaping mouth of ancient crocodiles
PHYS.ORG The mouth of today's crocodilians inspires fear and awe, with their wide gape and the greatest known bite force in the vertebrate animal kingdom. However, this apex predator of today and its modus of... 2 days
Why reducing antibiotics in farm animals isn't as easy as it seems
PHYS.ORG The use of antibiotics in meat production is a rapidly emerging issue in food discourse. The conversation around meat, eggs and dairy has focused... 2 days
Bees get stressed at work too (and it might be causing colony collapse)
PHYS.ORG Ever been overworked, tired and felt muddle-headed? Research now shows honey bees suffer from the same thing – and we understand why. 2 days
The privacy problem with camera traps: you don't know who else could be watching
PHYS.ORG We use remotely activated cameras – known as camera traps – to study the ecology and population responses of wildlife... 2 days
Volgograd—how a dam on the mighty Volga almost killed off the caviar fish
PHYS.ORG The floodlights will soon be turned on at the newly built Volgograd Arena for the first World Cup match to be held... 2 days
Study unravels 'blood stem cell niche' puzzle
NEWS MEDICAL VIDEO In humans and other mammals, the stem cells that give rise to all blood cells are located in the bone. But in fish, blood stem cells are found in the kidney. Since the late... 2 days
AP Was There: The age of climate change begins
PHYS.ORG On June 23, 1988, a top NASA scientist told Congress and the world that global warming had arrived. NASA scientist James Hansen predicted that 1988 would be the world's hottest... 2 days
In South Africa, plans for a refuge for pangolins in peril
PHYS.ORG Monitored by a conservationist, a young pangolin slurped ants with a long tongue near a veterinary hospital that became a temporary home after the animal was... 4 days
Research shows diet shift of beluga whales in Alaska inlet
PHYS.ORG Beluga whales in Alaska's Cook Inlet may have changed their diet over five decades from saltwater prey to fish and crustaceans influenced by freshwater, according to a study... 4 days
Mammals going nocturnal to avoid humans
SCIENCE DAILY Human activity is causing the planet's mammals to flee daylight for the protection of night, according to a new study. 5 days
3D imaging and computer modeling capture breast duct development
SCIENCE DAILY Working with hundreds of time-lapse videos of mouse tissue, a team of biologists joined up with civil engineers to create what is believed to be the first 3D computer model... 5 days
Flying Spiders Test the Winds Before Sailing on Silk Kites
LIVE SCIENCE How do some spiders fly? 5 days
Hawaii Will Finally Force Companies to Say What Pesticides They’re Spraying
LIVE SCIENCE A new law in Hawaii requires companies to disclose the mystery cocktail of pesticides they spray at secret sites. 5 days
What turns bees into killer bees?
Science Magazine Study reveals the brain biochemistry behind aggressive honeybees 5 days
To avoid humans, more wildlife now work the night shift
PHYS.ORG For their first 100 million years on planet Earth, our mammal ancestors relied on the cover of darkness to escape their dinosaur predators and competitors. Only after the... 5 days
Flatworms found to win most battles with harvestmen
PHYS.ORG A trio of researchers with Universidade de São Paulo has documented evidence of flatworms and harvestmen engaging in battle in the forests of Brazil. In their paper published in the Journal of... 5 days
Flying spiders sense meteorological conditions, use nanoscale fibers to float on the wind
SCIENCE DAILY Spiders take flight on the smallest of breezes by first sensing the wind, and then spinning out dozens of nanoscale fibers up... 5 days
Warming oceans will affect sharks' brains
PHYS.ORG Rising ocean temperatures due to climate change will not only be felt by smaller organisms like coral, but will also impact apex predators, according to new research. 5 days
Fish suffer stage fright?
PHYS.ORG Archerfish, famed for their ability to hunt prey by shooting them down with jets of water, seem to suffer social inhibition, according to new research led by the University of St Andrews. 5 days
eDNA analysis—a key to uncovering rare marine species
PHYS.ORG The days of searching the oceans around the world to find and study rare and endangered marine animals are not over. However, an emerging tool that can be used with just a... 5 days
Researchers study lanternfly's potential to harm grapevines
PHYS.ORG VIDEO The spotted lanternfly is starting to sour the grape and wine industries in southeastern Pennsylvania, and research underway in Penn State's College of Agricultural Sciences aims to spoil the invasive pest's party. 5 days
Biological light sensor filmed in action
PHYS.ORG VIDEO Using X-ray laser technology, a team led by researchers of the Paul Scherrer Institute PSI has recorded one of the fastest processes in biology. In doing so, they produced a molecular movie that reveals how the... 5 days
Strategic strikes by mantis shrimp smash shells selectively
PHYS.ORG For a tiny crustacean, Caribbean rock mantis shrimp (Neogonodactylus bredini) pack a ferocious punch. Bludgeoning the shells of snails and other crustaceans to gain access to the tasty snail within, mantis shrimp... 5 days
Early birds less prone to depression
SCIENCE DAILY A study of 32,000 women found that those with an early chronotype, or sleep-wake preference, were significantly less likely to develop depression. 6 days
DNA 'fossils' in fish, amphibians, and reptiles reveal deep diversity of retroviruses
SCIENCE DAILY Retroviruses, a broad category of viruses that infect humans and other vertebrates, have much greater diversity than previously thought, according to new research. 6 days
Early birds less likely to develop depression
NEWS MEDICAL Middle-to-older aged women who are naturally early to bed and early to rise are significantly less likely to develop depression, according to a new study by researchers at University of Colorado Boulder and the... 6 days
Climate change has fish moving faster than regulations can keep up
SCIENCE DAILY The world's system for allocating fish stocks is being outpaced by the movement of fish species in response to climate change, according to a study undertaken... 6 days
Mammals becoming more nocturnal for fear of humans
NEWS MEDICAL Mammals have always roamed free during day light looking and foraging for food until now when they have shifted their timings to after sunset for fear of encountering humans find researchers. The... 6 days
Engineers create first 3D computer model to show breast duct development
NEWS MEDICAL Working with hundreds of time-lapse videos of mouse tissue, a team of biologists joined up with civil engineers to create what is believed to be the... 6 days
Landmark Mediterranean diet study from 2013 retracted
NEWS MEDICAL Mediterranean diet has been known to be one of the best diets that most nutritionists and diet experts swear by. It includes fruits, vegetables, nuts, oily fish and olive oil and is supposedly the... 6 days
The influence of human disturbance on wildlife nocturnality
Science Magazine Rapid expansion of human activity has driven well-documented shifts in the spatial distribution of wildlife, but the cumulative effect of human disturbance on the temporal dynamics of animals has not been quantified.... 6 days
Many animals are shifting from day to night to avoid people
PHYS.ORG Lions and tigers and bears are increasingly becoming night owls because of us, a new study says. 6 days
Why Is This Tree Covered in a Ghostly Web?
LIVE SCIENCE No, a spider didn't build this web — hundreds or thousands of tiny caterpillars did. 6 days
Medical News Today: Is crab and other seafood safe to eat during pregnancy?
MNT Many women are concerned about the seafood they eat during pregnancy due to the risk of food poisoning and high mercury content.... 6 days
DNA 'fossils' in fish, amphibians, and reptiles reveal deep diversity of retroviruses
PHYS.ORG Retroviruses, a broad category of viruses that infect humans and other vertebrates, have much greater diversity than previously thought, according to new research presented... 6 days
99-Million-Year-Old Hard Tick Wrapped in Spider Silk Found Encased in Amber
SCI-NEWS.COM The oldest example of a tick wrapped in spider silk has been found, preserved... 6 days
Climate change means fish are moving faster than fishing rules, study says
PHYS.ORG Climate change is forcing fish species to shift their habitats faster than the world's system for allocating fish stocks, exacerbating international fisheries conflicts, according... 6 days
Flying spiders sense meteorological conditions, use nanoscale fibers to float on the wind
PHYS.ORG Spiders take flight on the smallest of breezes by first sensing the wind, and then spinning out dozens of nanoscale fibers up... 6 days
Human activity is causing more and more animals to embrace the night
Science Magazine As animals and humans compete for space, animals retreat into the darkness 6 days
Sex reversal following deletion of a single distal enhancer of Sox9
Science Magazine Cell fate decisions require appropriate regulation of key genes. Sox9, a direct target of SRY, is pivotal in mammalian sex determination. In vivo high-throughput chromatin accessibility... 6 days
Key ocean fish can prevail with changes to farmed fish, livestock diets
PHYS.ORG Anchovies, herring, sardines and other forage fish play an essential role in the food web as prey for seabirds, marine mammals and larger fish... 6 days
Agency considers dropping wolf protections
PHYS.ORG The federal government is considering another attempt to drop legal protections for gray wolves across the lower 48 states, reopening a lengthy battle over the predator species. 6 days
Amber fossils provide oldest evidence of frogs in wet, tropical forests
PHYS.ORG About 99 million years ago, a tiny juvenile frog in present-day Myanmar was suddenly trapped in sap with a beetle, perhaps its intended next meal. 6 days
BiologyA  CatsA  DogsA  
Study unravels 'blood stem cell niche' puzzle
NEWS MEDICAL
Biological light sensor filmed in action
PHYS.ORG
Researchers study lanternfly's potential to harm grapevines
PHYS.ORG
A bird's eye view of changing glaciers
PHYS.ORG
Scientists discover bees understand the concept of zero
PHYS.ORG
Beaver dams without beavers? Artificial logjams are a popular but controversial restoration tool
Science Magazine
First tetrapods of Africa lived within the Devonian Antarctic Circle
PHYS.ORG
New tools reveal prelude to chaos
PHYS.ORG
Human encouragement might influence how dogs solve problems
PHYS.ORG
Catfish swallows prey almost the same size
Parallel State
Peacock Spider's Mating Dance
Parallel State